Date   

Re: Describing your hobby

Paul Doggett
 

I don’t even try they accept me as a biker and railroad modeller or they can lump it other people’s opinions don’t bother me they take me as they find me or they go and take a run.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿

On 11 May 2019, at 17:00, Nolan Hinshaw via Groups.Io <cearnog=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

On May 11, 2019, at 07:53, Tom Madden via Groups.Io <pullmanboss=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I try to avoid using the word "trains" in a first reply.
I de-emphasize the trains, stating that I simulate historical transportation systems. Drilling deeper to railroads, I state that the trains are merely actors on the stages I mess with.

^<@<.@*
}"_# |
-@$&/_%
!( @|=>
;`+$?^?
,#"~|)^G







Re: Describing your hobby

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On May 11, 2019, at 07:53, Tom Madden via Groups.Io <pullmanboss=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I try to avoid using the word "trains" in a first reply.
I de-emphasize the trains, stating that I simulate historical transportation systems. Drilling deeper to railroads, I state that the trains are merely actors on the stages I mess with.

^<@<.@*
}"_# |
-@$&/_%
!( @|=>
;`+$?^?
,#"~|)^G


Re: Tangent Tank Car Additions

 

Group,

Forgot to mention, dowels fully protect axle socket from grit blasting. Taper is a little less than
shape of socket.

Dan Smith


Re: Tangent Tank Car Additions

 

Hi Jerry,

I think you might mean me. I have , I hope, put in a photo to show what you said.
Dowels and a Tichy USRA truck as it would come out of blaster.

Dan Smith


Re: Tangent Tank Car Additions

Tim O'Connor
 

Jerry

That's also a good idea - I think I will just pull the wheels off of some Athearn plastic wheelsets
and use the AXLES ! This may keep grit and paint out of the inside of the journal bearings. :-)

Tim O'

On 5/11/2019 3:49 AM, jerryglow2 wrote:
Back when I was in SoCal and ran a model paint shop, one friend sharpened dowls to use in place of wheelsets when we media blasted trucks.
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Describing your hobby

BillM
 

Peter

What is the link to your website? I apologize if it was posted and I missed it.

Blessings

Bill Michael

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Peter Ness
Sent: Saturday, May 11, 2019 7:40 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Describing your hobby

 

Over the years of responding, for me, the most suitable response is; "I play with trains".  As others have commented usual responses range from knowing someone in the family that also plays with or used to play with trains, to an admission the querent used to play with trains.  VERY rarely, but sometimes, they respond they also play with trains or their spouse plays with (or collects) trains. I can't say I've met many nasty folks - whatever the definition is - but the worst I get is a grunt to which I respond; "Hey! In some ways I guess I never grew up!" If there is any follow-up conversation I say my interests have changed over the years and I model a specific railroad in New England and tell them they can take a look at my website if they are curious.  Sometimes mentioning New England changes the course of the conversation to visits they have made or family that live there, etc. If the initial response is either fish eyes on ice or deer in the headlights I go straight to the "never grew up line", chuckle and move the conversation along.

One thing I've also noticed over the years; in many - but not all - cases the hobby question is asked of me AFTER the person has already told me their hobby.  If they have already told me of their hobby, I pattern my response along the lines of theirs; if it was a brief "I collect guns" I reply; "I collect trains", if they have waxed eloquent over the fascinating and creative world of scrapbooking I counter with the joys of modeling the New Haven Railroad in 1959. If this is not what prompted their question, it is usually my follow-up.  Heck, of someone wants to take the chance to ask of my hobby, lets put them on the spot as well.

I've had the question asked on job interviews and give exactly the same response.  Over years I've learned from the HR POV this can be a checkbox question.  It is better to have a hobby than not. And it is better to have a hobby that is NOT surfing the interwebs or playing video games. In interviews with hiring managers I have learned that having a hobby that involves use of hands is a strong plus, indicating a "hands on" approach to problem solving - a very desirable trait in any field. Little do they know...but still, I like to think there is some merit to their line of thinking. I have a link to my website on my resume and LinkedIn.  In (hopefully) my most recent hire (back to my home in New Hampshire, last planned job before retirement), my hiring manager posted a complete sentence that my hobby is model railroading in the org announcement. To date at work, no one has contacted me about model trains, but 4-5 guys have come to introduce themselves because I drive a Trans Am and they also drive a muscle car.  Oh well.... 

Peter Ness

 


Re: Describing your hobby

Tom Madden
 

I try to avoid using the word "trains" in a first reply. I say "I'm a railroad historian" and see where that leads. If pressed, I'll say i do research which gives me the opportunity to travel and give presentations. If you've ever gone to an RPM meet, even if you've not given a clinic, some variation of this approach get's you out of the "playing with trains" arena. If someone wants to go deeper, I try to work 3D printing into the conversation. Even if you're not involved in it, mentioning the application of 3D printing or other advanced technologies to our hobby will give you the conversational upper hand and, often, pique someone's interest and lead to a really rewarding conversation. Which is the point, right?

Tom Madden


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] BLI Tank Cars - Other prototypes?

Randy Hammill
 

While the paint schemes are accurate for the most part (I haven’t been able to verify UTLX), they have started to use some road numbers I couldn’t verify. I only have a few photos and some as-built information, though. I can tell you for ones I’ve confirmed as-built aren’t always in the ‘47 or later ORER, but this doesn’t surprise me since it seems tank cars changed lessees fairly frequently.

Your best bet is to use the Hendrickson article for the Trix cars, combined with the ORER for your era to narrow down a few to get. You can send me a direct message on specific cars you’re looking for and I can see if I can help.

Randy 
--
Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954

--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] BLI Tank Cars - Other prototypes?

Steve and Barb Hile
 

See message 161525 and following from this past January.  I didn't include enough key words in my message to make it easy to find with the group's search function, which actually works quite well.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of devansprr
Sent: Saturday, May 11, 2019 12:16 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] BLI Tank Cars - Other prototypes?

Gentlemen,

Back in March 2017 on the old list, some discussion of the first run of these cars suggested that the paint schemes were likely authentic due to use of photographs and ACF paint records from the Barriger collection.

For the UTLX tanks now offered, the car numbers do not appear to match the ORER for either 1943 or 1945. (ORER lists numbers in this range as car type LT - rated at 100,000 pounds capacity.)

Is BLI taking accurate paint schemes for various tank cars but applying them to models that may be off considerably from the prototype car? Or is the UTLX model an outlier, or am I misinterpreting the ORER?

I tried searching the archives here but did not find many 2019 posts about the latest BLI run.

Thanks-in-advance,
Dave Evans


Re: Describing your hobby

Peter Ness
 

Over the years of responding, for me, the most suitable response is; "I play with trains".  As others have commented usual responses range from knowing someone in the family that also plays with or used to play with trains, to an admission the querent used to play with trains.  VERY rarely, but sometimes, they respond they also play with trains or their spouse plays with (or collects) trains. I can't say I've met many nasty folks - whatever the definition is - but the worst I get is a grunt to which I respond; "Hey! In some ways I guess I never grew up!" If there is any follow-up conversation I say my interests have changed over the years and I model a specific railroad in New England and tell them they can take a look at my website if they are curious.  Sometimes mentioning New England changes the course of the conversation to visits they have made or family that live there, etc. If the initial response is either fish eyes on ice or deer in the headlights I go straight to the "never grew up line", chuckle and move the conversation along.

One thing I've also noticed over the years; in many - but not all - cases the hobby question is asked of me AFTER the person has already told me their hobby.  If they have already told me of their hobby, I pattern my response along the lines of theirs; if it was a brief "I collect guns" I reply; "I collect trains", if they have waxed eloquent over the fascinating and creative world of scrapbooking I counter with the joys of modeling the New Haven Railroad in 1959. If this is not what prompted their question, it is usually my follow-up.  Heck, of someone wants to take the chance to ask of my hobby, lets put them on the spot as well.

I've had the question asked on job interviews and give exactly the same response.  Over years I've learned from the HR POV this can be a checkbox question.  It is better to have a hobby than not. And it is better to have a hobby that is NOT surfing the interwebs or playing video games. In interviews with hiring managers I have learned that having a hobby that involves use of hands is a strong plus, indicating a "hands on" approach to problem solving - a very desirable trait in any field. Little do they know...but still, I like to think there is some merit to their line of thinking. I have a link to my website on my resume and LinkedIn.  In (hopefully) my most recent hire (back to my home in New Hampshire, last planned job before retirement), my hiring manager posted a complete sentence that my hobby is model railroading in the org announcement. To date at work, no one has contacted me about model trains, but 4-5 guys have come to introduce themselves because I drive a Trans Am and they also drive a muscle car.  Oh well.... 

Peter Ness


Re: Tangent Tank Car Additions

jerryglow2
 

Back when I was in SoCal and ran a model paint shop, one friend sharpened dowls to use in place of wheelsets when we media blasted trucks.


Re: Describing your hobby

np328
 

  John, 
     I explain that I am into railroad research and "yeah, I play with trains also". And I look straight into their eyes when I say this.
           If we at my house I'll offer them a copy of my railroad societies historical magazine with an article that I've had published. After looking at the article for a moment, most people give an appreciative grunt.  Most professional people acknowledge the work that takes. 

      Now with others, (it depends on the read you get off them or if they are  - the nasty ones - as described by Roger above.) I'll answer that "I do historical research, mostly about railroads. And before you ask, do I play with trains? Yup, just like Reverend Lovejoy on the Simpsons ! "  I've found that to generate anything from a smile to more often laughter. For most of those nasty types, the humor completely deflects any follow up they might have. Other people, it seems to put them at ease. Matt Groening always has wrote Reverend Lovejoy's model railroading experiences as never going too well. A useful foil.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Jim Dick - St. Paul   


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] BLI Tank Cars - Other prototypes?

devansprr
 

Gentlemen,

Back in March 2017 on the old list, some discussion of the first run of these cars suggested that the paint schemes were likely authentic due to use of photographs and ACF paint records from the Barriger collection.

For the UTLX tanks now offered, the car numbers do not appear to match the ORER for either 1943 or 1945. (ORER lists numbers in this range as car type LT - rated at 100,000 pounds capacity.)

Is BLI taking accurate paint schemes for various tank cars but applying them to models that may be off considerably from the prototype car? Or is the UTLX model an outlier, or am I misinterpreting the ORER?

I tried searching the archives here but did not find many 2019 posts about the latest BLI run.

Thanks-in-advance,
Dave Evans


Re: PRR 2D-F1 HO trucks, was Describing your hobby

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Dave,
 
Thanks.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Dave Parker via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, May 10, 2019 11:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR 2D-F1 HO trucks, was Describing your hobby
 
Ralph, AFAIK the Bowser arch-bar (74326, 74325) is based on the 2D-F1.  And their Crown truck on the 2E-F2.

Dave Parker
Riverside CA


Describing my Hobby

Paul Catapano
 

I tell them that what I do in my hobby is on the lunatic fringe of the lunatic fringe.

Paul Catapano
Winchester, Va.


Re: PRR 2D-F1 HO trucks, was Describing your hobby

Dave Parker
 

Ralph, AFAIK the Bowser arch-bar (74326, 74325) is based on the 2D-F1.  And their Crown truck on the 2E-F2.

Dave Parker
Riverside CA


PRR 2D-F1 HO trucks, was Describing your hobby

Ralph W. Brown
 

Alas, it seems we’re a much misunderstood lot, but most of the uninitiated have no clue what they’re missing!
 
Speaking describing the hobby or things pertaining to the hobby, however, does any know of an available HO scale model of an arch bar truck with a 5’6” wheelbase that would work for a PRR 2D-F1?
 
Pax,
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: mopacfirst
Sent: Friday, May 10, 2019 10:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Describing your hobby
 
The classic conversation:

"You're what?  Oh, trains.  How many sets do you have?"

When I say "None", they're usually totally non-plussed.  Explaining about building freight cars sometimes lasts a few sentences, long enough for the other party to recall that Uncle whatever, or Grandpa, used to have some Lionel and how it's either still in the attic or "How much do you think it's worth and can I sell it on eBay?"

Ron Merrick


Re: Describing your hobby

Jim Hayes
 

My wife would say I build museum quality models.

JimH


Re: Describing your hobby

Tim O'Connor
 

"model trains" - I might get a weird look, but there's rarely any follow up. which is fine with me.

"surfing the web" seems to be the most popular leisure activity in the entire world now :-(

On 5/10/2019 10:46 PM, mopacfirst wrote:
The classic conversation:

"You're what?  Oh, trains.  How many sets do you have?"

When I say "None", they're usually totally non-plussed. Explaining about building freight cars sometimes lasts a few sentences, long enough for the other party to recall that Uncle whatever, or Grandpa, used to have some Lionel and how it's either still in the attic or "How much do you think it's worth and can I sell it on eBay?"

Ron Merrick
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Describing your hobby

mopacfirst
 

The classic conversation:

"You're what?  Oh, trains.  How many sets do you have?"

When I say "None", they're usually totally non-plussed.  Explaining about building freight cars sometimes lasts a few sentences, long enough for the other party to recall that Uncle whatever, or Grandpa, used to have some Lionel and how it's either still in the attic or "How much do you think it's worth and can I sell it on eBay?"

Ron Merrick

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