Date   
Re: Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Nelson,

The Ghost White is a cartridge that replaces the black. I can switch.  I gave a clinic at the Greensberg, PA RPM on the Ghost White. I plan to give it at Winston-Salem’s Carolina RPM too.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

--
____________________________
David Bott, modeling the A&Y in '34

Re: Clover House Chalk Marks

Paul Doggett
 

I have found when using British dry print transfers that have dried out methylated spirit helps them to adhere to any matt or gloss surface.

Paul 


On 26 May 2019, at 17:52, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:

In my experience, CDS dry transfers seem to have problems with applications over gloss (Such as  Accu-Paint). Dull coat makes it workable. I agree that a slight warming helps the transfer material leave better.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





Ok if you say so. I can't think of a single reason not to apply them over gloss.

Tim O


Peter is using dry transfers, not decals 😉   In my experience, dry transfers work equally well over both gloss or flat.


Regards,

Bruce Smith



Re: Doors with inside detail

O Fenton Wells
 

Looking good Tim, nicely done.
Fenton

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 12:38 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

well done!


On 5/26/2019 12:28 PM, StephenK wrote:
After potting around with this for a few weeks, I finally got a good result.   I tried several ways of pressing aluminum foil on the outside of the door, but nothing would get the detail to show properly.   An attempt at using strip styrene was more trouble than it was worth.  In addition, I realized that the kit door had latch detail molded in which would show on the inside.  I ended up making a simple casting.   I used a similar door out of my stash and carved off the latches, etc.   I attached the door to a sheet of plastic and poured Elmer's School Glue over the door.   I poked around in it to remove the bubbles and let it dry overnight.   The next day the glue was mostly dry and peeled off easily.  I ACC's it to the kit door, trimmed the excess and painted it Floquil Old Silver.   A little rust powder, and the door was done.   

A few other notes:  The wood interior walls had to be trimmed a bit to clear the kit roof.   I chose not to use the wood floor from the interior kit because it added a layer to the car that I though looked wrong--I painted the plastic kit floor instead.    I built bulkheads at each end of the car and filled the space with BBs for weight--a normal interior weight would add to the floor height and again I didn't want that.   I have left the car unweathered and the roof unattached until I decide what the load should be and get it built and installed (a car carrying bags of flour will have different weathering than a car carrying boxes of  merchandise).  In any case, the kit went together well and I am happy with the result.  

Attachments:



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

Clover House Chalk Marks

Andy Carlson
 

In my experience, CDS dry transfers seem to have problems with applications over gloss (Such as  Accu-Paint). Dull coat makes it workable. I agree that a slight warming helps the transfer material leave better.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





Ok if you say so. I can't think of a single reason not to apply them over gloss.

Tim O


Peter is using dry transfers, not decals 😉   In my experience, dry transfers work equally well over both gloss or flat.


Regards,

Bruce Smith



Re: Clover House Chalk Marks

Tim O'Connor
 


Ok if you say so. I can't think of a single reason not to apply them over gloss.

Tim O'


On 5/26/2019 12:34 PM, Bruce Smith wrote:

Tim,


Peter is using dry transfers, not decals 😉   In my experience, dry transfers work equally well over both gloss or flat.


Regards,

Bruce Smith




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Doors with inside detail

Tim O'Connor
 


well done!


On 5/26/2019 12:28 PM, StephenK wrote:
After potting around with this for a few weeks, I finally got a good result.   I tried several ways of pressing aluminum foil on the outside of the door, but nothing would get the detail to show properly.   An attempt at using strip styrene was more trouble than it was worth.  In addition, I realized that the kit door had latch detail molded in which would show on the inside.  I ended up making a simple casting.   I used a similar door out of my stash and carved off the latches, etc.   I attached the door to a sheet of plastic and poured Elmer's School Glue over the door.   I poked around in it to remove the bubbles and let it dry overnight.   The next day the glue was mostly dry and peeled off easily.  I ACC's it to the kit door, trimmed the excess and painted it Floquil Old Silver.   A little rust powder, and the door was done.   

A few other notes:  The wood interior walls had to be trimmed a bit to clear the kit roof.   I chose not to use the wood floor from the interior kit because it added a layer to the car that I though looked wrong--I painted the plastic kit floor instead.    I built bulkheads at each end of the car and filled the space with BBs for weight--a normal interior weight would add to the floor height and again I didn't want that.   I have left the car unweathered and the roof unattached until I decide what the load should be and get it built and installed (a car carrying bags of flour will have different weathering than a car carrying boxes of  merchandise).  In any case, the kit went together well and I am happy with the result.  

Attachments:

_._,_._,_


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Clover House Chalk Marks

Tim O'Connor
 


Obviously must depend on storage conditions. I've used transfers 25+ years old with very
few problems. But one thing I always do is to transfer the SMALL stuff to decal paper first,
and brush over Microscale Liquid Decal Film. I started doing it just to make it easier to place
them exactly right. Regular decals dry out too, if they are stored improperly.

Tim O'Connor



On 5/26/2019 11:37 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 07:43 AM, peteraue wrote:
My dry transfer sheets are a few years old. What am I doing wrong?
Dry transfers eventually go bad. They are sticky ink printed on wax paper; pressing them against another surface causes the ink to stick to the surface better than it sticks to the wax, and it transfers. With age the ink drys out and becomes hard and less sticky and it will no longer transfer. I haven't tried this, but for small transfers like chalk marks, you might try gently warming the spot on the sheet over an incandescent light bulb and see if it transfers better warm.

Dennis Storzek


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Clover House Chalk Marks

Bruce Smith
 

Tim,


Peter is using dry transfers, not decals 😉   In my experience, dry transfers work equally well over both gloss or flat.


Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 26, 2019 10:03 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Clover House Chalk Marks
 
Peter

decals should be applied prior to Dullcote

over Dullcote your best bets

     (1) fine artist's pencils (e.g. PrismaColor)
     (2) Gelly Roll fine & medium WHITE ink pens

Tim




On 5/26/2019 10:43 AM, peteraue via Groups.Io wrote:
> I am looking for guidance because I'd much rather use dry transfer
> chalk marks than decals. Though my car sides have a fresh flat
> Dullcote finish I cannot get my Clover House chalk marks to stick to??
> the surface. Besides various hardness pencils, I've tried every
> suitable device in my arsenal with absolutely no luck. Sometimes, a
> part of the chalk mark sticks but then the other part doesn't come off
> the carrier paper. Is there a degradation of the adhesive with age? My
> dry transfer sheets are a few years old. What am I doing wrong?
>
> Peter Aue


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*



Re: Doors with inside detail

Paul Doggett
 

Stephen 

That’s looking really good.

Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 26 May 2019, at 17:28, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:

After potting around with this for a few weeks, I finally got a good result.   I tried several ways of pressing aluminum foil on the outside of the door, but nothing would get the detail to show properly.   An attempt at using strip styrene was more trouble than it was worth.  In addition, I realized that the kit door had latch detail molded in which would show on the inside.  I ended up making a simple casting.   I used a similar door out of my stash and carved off the latches, etc.   I attached the door to a sheet of plastic and poured Elmer's School Glue over the door.   I poked around in it to remove the bubbles and let it dry overnight.   The next day the glue was mostly dry and peeled off easily.  I ACC's it to the kit door, trimmed the excess and painted it Floquil Old Silver.   A little rust powder, and the door was done.   

A few other notes:  The wood interior walls had to be trimmed a bit to clear the kit roof.   I chose not to use the wood floor from the interior kit because it added a layer to the car that I though looked wrong--I painted the plastic kit floor instead.    I built bulkheads at each end of the car and filled the space with BBs for weight--a normal interior weight would add to the floor height and again I didn't want that.   I have left the car unweathered and the roof unattached until I decide what the load should be and get it built and installed (a car carrying bags of flour will have different weathering than a car carrying boxes of  merchandise).  In any case, the kit went together well and I am happy with the result.  

Attachments:

Re: Doors with inside detail

StephenK
 

After potting around with this for a few weeks, I finally got a good result.   I tried several ways of pressing aluminum foil on the outside of the door, but nothing would get the detail to show properly.   An attempt at using strip styrene was more trouble than it was worth.  In addition, I realized that the kit door had latch detail molded in which would show on the inside.  I ended up making a simple casting.   I used a similar door out of my stash and carved off the latches, etc.   I attached the door to a sheet of plastic and poured Elmer's School Glue over the door.   I poked around in it to remove the bubbles and let it dry overnight.   The next day the glue was mostly dry and peeled off easily.  I ACC's it to the kit door, trimmed the excess and painted it Floquil Old Silver.   A little rust powder, and the door was done.   

A few other notes:  The wood interior walls had to be trimmed a bit to clear the kit roof.   I chose not to use the wood floor from the interior kit because it added a layer to the car that I though looked wrong--I painted the plastic kit floor instead.    I built bulkheads at each end of the car and filled the space with BBs for weight--a normal interior weight would add to the floor height and again I didn't want that.   I have left the car unweathered and the roof unattached until I decide what the load should be and get it built and installed (a car carrying bags of flour will have different weathering than a car carrying boxes of  merchandise).  In any case, the kit went together well and I am happy with the result.  

Re: Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, May 25, 2019 at 08:35 PM, A&Y Dave in MD wrote:
So Super Clean degreaser works on Accurail and Kadee lettering!
A word of warning. One of the reasons that Accurail makes no recommendation for a product to selectively remove lettering is over the past thirty years we have used paint from at least a dozen different suppliers. What works on one may not work so well on another, and neither we nor you have any way of telling which paint is under the lettering. I will assume that every other manufacturer has been forced to change paint suppliers for one reason or another. The key here is TEST. Find a hidden spot under or inside the model where you can test the solvent on the paint alone before committing to a highly noticeable spot on the model. Just because a certain solvent worked on one model of a particular brand does not mean it will be safe on all.

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.

Re: Clover House Chalk Marks

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 07:43 AM, peteraue wrote:
My dry transfer sheets are a few years old. What am I doing wrong?
Dry transfers eventually go bad. They are sticky ink printed on wax paper; pressing them against another surface causes the ink to stick to the surface better than it sticks to the wax, and it transfers. With age the ink drys out and becomes hard and less sticky and it will no longer transfer. I haven't tried this, but for small transfers like chalk marks, you might try gently warming the spot on the sheet over an incandescent light bulb and see if it transfers better warm.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Clover House Chalk Marks

Tim O'Connor
 

Peter

decals should be applied prior to Dullcote

over Dullcote your best bets

    (1) fine artist's pencils (e.g. PrismaColor)
    (2) Gelly Roll fine & medium WHITE ink pens

Tim

On 5/26/2019 10:43 AM, peteraue via Groups.Io wrote:
I am looking for guidance because I'd much rather use dry transfer chalk marks than decals. Though my car sides have a fresh flat Dullcote finish I cannot get my Clover House chalk marks to stick to?? the surface. Besides various hardness pencils, I've tried every suitable device in my arsenal with absolutely no luck. Sometimes, a part of the chalk mark sticks but then the other part doesn't come off the carrier paper. Is there a degradation of the adhesive with age? My dry transfer sheets are a few years old. What am I doing wrong?

Peter Aue
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Clover House Chalk Marks

peteraue
 

I am looking for guidance because I'd much rather use dry transfer chalk marks than decals. Though my car sides have a fresh flat Dullcote finish I cannot get my Clover House chalk marks to stick to?? the surface. Besides various hardness pencils, I've tried every suitable device in my arsenal with absolutely no luck. Sometimes, a part of the chalk mark sticks but then the other part doesn't come off the carrier paper. Is there a degradation of the adhesive with age? My dry transfer sheets are a few years old. What am I doing wrong?

Peter Aue

Re: Printing White Decals was Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

Jeff
 

There are several custom decal people out there (it is sort of a
cottage industry, yes). The person I use is Bill Brillinger at
http://pdc.ca

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 7:31 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like a possible cottage industry printing white decals – provide the artwork file and the entrepreneur prints and returns the decals for a reasonable fee. This looks like a great way to print white reweigh and repack dates and locations, road number options, return to stencils, loading instructions, MOW decals, and many other decals not otherwise available. Any interest out there?



Nelson Moyer



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jon Miller
Sent: Sunday, May 26, 2019 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering



On 5/26/2019 6:49 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

I’ve heard about ghost white toner

I also read up on the various white toners. What I read was a dedicated machine. However when I saw the price I quickly dropped the subject!:-D

--

Jon Miller

For me time stopped in 1941

Digitrax Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User

SPROG User

NMRA Life member #2623

Member SFRH&MS



--
Jeff Shultz
http://www.shultzinfosystems.com
A railfan approaches a grade crossing hoping that there will be a train.

Printing White Decals was Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

Nelson Moyer
 

Sounds like a possible cottage industry printing white decals – provide the artwork file and the entrepreneur prints and returns the decals for a reasonable fee. This looks like a great way to print white reweigh and repack dates and locations, road number options, return to stencils, loading instructions, MOW decals, and many other decals not otherwise available. Any interest out there?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jon Miller
Sent: Sunday, May 26, 2019 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

 

On 5/26/2019 6:49 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

I’ve heard about ghost white toner

    I also read up on the various white toners.  What I read was a dedicated machine.  However when I saw the price I quickly dropped the subject!:-D

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

 

Re: Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

Jon Miller
 

On 5/26/2019 6:49 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
I’ve heard about ghost white toner

    I also read up on the various white toners.  What I read was a dedicated machine.  However when I saw the price I quickly dropped the subject!:-D

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

Nelson Moyer
 

Super Clean is a mild alkali with less than 5% by volume sodium hydroxide. It’s has a low vapor pressure so it’s not highly volatile like organic solvents, e.g. acetone, lacquer thinner, etc., and respiratory protection isn’t required. It’s safe to use in an enclosed environment. Skin/eye protection is important. I wear nitrile gloves and my glasses, and that’s sufficient.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Garth Groff
Sent: Sunday, May 26, 2019 3:39 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

 

Friends,

A safety data sheet  on Super Clean Degreaser can be found at https://www.superclean.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/2016-SuperClean-Degreaser-SDS-v2.0.pdf . The product is corrosive to metals, and thus also to skin. Gloves and face/eye protection are recommended. I would use this stuff on the patio to allow quick vapor dispersal. (I do this with acetone/lacquer/nail polish remover which I use in making arrows).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

Re: Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

Nelson Moyer
 

I have to give credit where it’s due. Jerry Hamsmith told me about Super Clean. He uses it to strip paint from Accurail hoppers as the first step in kitbashing them into CB&Q HK-10s. I’ve tried it once. I soaked the car for a couple of hours and the lettering came off when I gently brushed the sides with a soft toothbrush, but the paint remained intact. Since I wanted to strip the paint as well, I soaked it overnight and brushed it again. Nothing happened. After two days of soaking, the paint started to soften a little, and I was able to remove most of it, but not all. Finally after four days of soaking and brushing, I was able to completely remove all of the paint. I had tried soaking in 91% isopropanol for days, but that didn’t touch either the lettering or the paint.

 

 

Cotton swabs are mildly abrasive when you rub the car, so that’s probably why you saw color in the swab. Try soaking for 1-2 hr. and gently brushing, and the lettering should come off easily, leaving the base color untouched. Of course, that only applied when you want to remove all of the lettering. You’ll have to experiment with selective letter removal, Maybe cutting a patch of paper towel to cover the lettering you want to remove and keeping it wet longer before scraping would work better than rubbing with a swab. I’ve cut ends off toothpicks at an angle to make a chisel for scraping small lettering.

 

I’ve heard about ghost white toner, but never tried it. Do you need a dedicated laser printer, or can you switch back and forth between black and white toner in the same printer?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of A&Y Dave in MD
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2019 10:36 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

 



Nelson,

I went to the Dollar Store today and picked up a bottle of this stuff.  Poured a small amount into a cup leftover from Nyquil.  Dipped a cotton swab in the solution to wet the tip without drenching it. Applied the damp tip to the number on a Kadee boxcar (one of the new Southern ones I got yesterday).  Less than two minutes of scrubbing showed the numbering was coming off.  Within five minutes the number was gone.  The paint color could be seen on the swab, so it would remove the paint if you aren't careful.  I used the dry end of the cotton swab to wipe the area clean after the numeral was off.  I'm going to let it dry.  I probably should have washed it with water to ensure no further loosening of the paint.  But with the minimal amount of cleaner on the swab it seemed to evaporate fairly quickly.

It is much harder to remove the numeral on the end, but only because the size is so small and the contours of the end make it difficult to rub a swab.  I'll experiment with a toothpick and/or a microbrush later, once the sides are dried and sealed.

So Super Clean degreaser works on Accurail and Kadee lettering!  And at $1 for a 20 oz. bottle, I have a lifetime supply.  Nice!

I'll use my Ghost White Toner to print the new numerals.  The Kadee car apparently only came in one number so far.  I ordered two cars, hoping for two numbers.  This thread was timed well!   The car is a '48 build, so this will be for the FCSME 1955 era layout instead of my '34 era home layout. The car was well done and even though I have a ton of '55 era cars these were too good to pass up for this "y'all road" modeler.   Maybe I'll use the degreaser to remove the packing year and replace that for '53 or so.  

Thanks Nelson!

Dave Bott

Re: Super Clean Degreaser to remove lettering

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

A safety data sheet  on Super Clean Degreaser can be found at https://www.superclean.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/2016-SuperClean-Degreaser-SDS-v2.0.pdf . The product is corrosive to metals, and thus also to skin. Gloves and face/eye protection are recommended. I would use this stuff on the patio to allow quick vapor dispersal. (I do this with acetone/lacquer/nail polish remover which I use in making arrows).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 5/25/19 11:35 PM, A&Y Dave in MD wrote:


Nelson,

I went to the Dollar Store today and picked up a bottle of this stuff.  Poured a small amount into a cup leftover from Nyquil.  Dipped a cotton swab in the solution to wet the tip without drenching it. Applied the damp tip to the number on a Kadee boxcar (one of the new Southern ones I got yesterday).  Less than two minutes of scrubbing showed the numbering was coming off.  Within five minutes the number was gone.  The paint color could be seen on the swab, so it would remove the paint if you aren't careful.  I used the dry end of the cotton swab to wipe the area clean after the numeral was off.  I'm going to let it dry.  I probably should have washed it with water to ensure no further loosening of the paint.  But with the minimal amount of cleaner on the swab it seemed to evaporate fairly quickly.

It is much harder to remove the numeral on the end, but only because the size is so small and the contours of the end make it difficult to rub a swab.  I'll experiment with a toothpick and/or a microbrush later, once the sides are dried and sealed.

So Super Clean degreaser works on Accurail and Kadee lettering!  And at $1 for a 20 oz. bottle, I have a lifetime supply.  Nice!

I'll use my Ghost White Toner to print the new numerals.  The Kadee car apparently only came in one number so far.  I ordered two cars, hoping for two numbers.  This thread was timed well!   The car is a '48 build, so this will be for the FCSME 1955 era layout instead of my '34 era home layout. The car was well done and even though I have a ton of '55 era cars these were too good to pass up for this "y'all road" modeler.   Maybe I'll use the degreaser to remove the packing year and replace that for '53 or so.  

Thanks Nelson!

Dave Bott

Friday, May 24, 2019, 1:57:18 AM, you wrote:

Super Clean degreaser will lift lettering from Accurail cars in less than two hours without affecting the paint – unless you soak cars for a week and scrub hard with a toothbrush. I haven’t tried to selectively remove lettering or used it on Walthers cars.
 
Nelson Moyer






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--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC
 
--
____________________________
David Bott, modeling the A&Y in '34