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Re: Photo: Delivering A 1957 Chevy

Jon Miller
 

On 5/29/2019 7:22 PM, Jim Hayes wrote:
That is most likely a new American Chevy being unloaded for sale in Canada

    While it was a long time ago I seems to remember don't buy a *** (GM) car in Canada because in the US they were only V8s but the Canadian ones had sixes in them.  What was made where I don't remember but thought Canadian GM cars had different trim!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Photo: Delivering A 1957 Chevy

Jim Hayes
 

That is most likely a new American Chevy being unloaded for sale in Canada. New cars were shipped with their hub caps/wheel covers in the trunk to avoid theft. If it was an Auto Train type publicity photo it certainly would have had wheel covers on it.

JimH


Re: Wanting to buy!

Allan Smith
 

I have three IMWX undec boxcars UNBR03 Square Corner I will sell for $12.00 each plus $8.00 shipping, total $44.00 if interested.

Al Smith
Sonora CA
Smithal9@...

On ‎Friday‎, ‎May‎ ‎24‎, ‎2019‎ ‎12‎:‎18‎:‎23‎ ‎PM‎ ‎PDT, pennsylvania1954 <stevehprr@...> wrote:


Pierre--Red Caboose ATSF but it is a kit. Currently on Ebay, 303156857803.
--
Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Photo: Delivering A 1957 Chevy

Tim O'Connor
 


"Auto train" is the correct analogy. They were not "freight cars" per se - not even listed in the ORER.

If you wanted to stage a publicity photo, would you try to find a beat up automobile to entice customers,
or show that a new automobile emerges unscathed from its trip?

Tim O'



On 5/29/2019 9:52 PM, Schleigh Mike via Groups.Io wrote:
The Model Railroader article did not relate just how the CN used these cars.  However, I always believed that they were used in much the way AutoTrain did.  That is, passengers on their long haul trains brought along their personal autos.  My wife's family likely used this service when they moved back east from Vancouver, BC in the mid-1960s as they brought home their car after a one-year assignment there.  My October 1958 ORER shows these cars not in interchange.  Perhaps one or more of those in the frozen north can comment.

However, that is clearly a NEW 1957 Chevy in that publicity photo.  There were only 25 cars in the fleet so they could have been used for delivering new cars in some limited or perhaps burgeoning new service offering.

Regards---Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.

On Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 9:19:17 PM EDT, rwitt_2000 via Groups.Io <rwitt_2000@...> wrote:


Question: Why a Canadian car? Were some cars built in Canada as early as 1957 or was there some sort of "car pool" in operation.

Bob Witt


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Delivering A 1957 Chevy

Schleigh Mike
 

The Model Railroader article did not relate just how the CN used these cars.  However, I always believed that they were used in much the way AutoTrain did.  That is, passengers on their long haul trains brought along their personal autos.  My wife's family likely used this service when they moved back east from Vancouver, BC in the mid-1960s as they brought home their car after a one-year assignment there.  My October 1958 ORER shows these cars not in interchange.  Perhaps one or more of those in the frozen north can comment.

However, that is clearly a NEW 1957 Chevy in that publicity photo.  There were only 25 cars in the fleet so they could have been used for delivering new cars in some limited or perhaps burgeoning new service offering.

Regards---Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.

On Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 9:19:17 PM EDT, rwitt_2000 via Groups.Io <rwitt_2000@...> wrote:


Question: Why a Canadian car? Were some cars built in Canada as early as 1957 or was there some sort of "car pool" in operation.

Bob Witt


Re: Photo: Delivering A 1957 Chevy

rwitt_2000
 

Question: Why a Canadian car? Were some cars built in Canada as early as 1957 or was there some sort of "car pool" in operation.

Bob Witt


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

Eric Hansmann
 

This might be the other photo in question. The Lackawanna boxcar is off to the right distance beside the locomotive. The brick storehouse is adjacent. I like the high walkway PTX tank car.

http://lists.railfan.net/erielack-photo/erielack-05-26-19/X6994.jpg



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN



On May 29, 2019 at 4:07 PM Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:

On Wed, May 29, 2019 at 08:45 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
Actually, there is at least one other photo of a completely different scene
I don't know what photo you think is different, but it appears that all photos in this set are views of the same group of buildings, in back of the roundhouse. Identifiable buildings appear in multiple pictures.
Jack Mullen


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

Jack Mullen
 

On Wed, May 29, 2019 at 08:45 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
Actually, there is at least one other photo of a completely different scene
I don't know what photo you think is different, but it appears that all photos in this set are views of the same group of buildings, in back of the roundhouse. Identifiable buildings appear in multiple pictures.
Jack Mullen


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, May 29, 2019 at 10:15 AM, Donald B. Valentine wrote:
From a second look I think you are right about only two truss rods on the DL&W boxcar,
I disagree, I think iy is a four truss rod car, and we can only see the near side rods. The inner rods are quite close to the center sills, as evidenced by the placement of their terminating nuts on the striker casting, and therefore are quite far from the outer rods. If uou look carefully under the car you can see the brake cylinder on the near side of the center sills, and the queenpost on the inner truss rod is quite close behind the brake rod that that runs to the lever on the near end of the brake cylinder. We can only see halfway under the car.

I also don't think the car has a steel centersill. If the car had been improved with steel sills, they would have included the draft sills, indeed one common improvement before the advent of steel center sills was steel replacement draft sills, as the draft sills tended to be the weakest part of the underframe. The construction visible at the end of the car still clearly has wood sills; the ends show, bolted below that cast striker, with the drawbar carry iron bolted to the bottom of the sills.

That end is a proprietary item, shown in the 1922 CBC. Given that there is no initials above the number, I bet the CBC illustration of of a DL&W car.


Dennis Storzek


Re: WAG CARS [WAS GATC Type 17]

Schleigh Mike
 

B&O O-41 No. 350370 is restored at the West Virginia Railroad Museum at Elkins.  Work was completed about 9.5 years ago.

Regards----Mike Schleigh at Grove City, Penna.

On Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 2:36:34 PM EDT, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend@...> wrote:


Do you happen to know which railroad museum in WVA it is?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Re: WAG CARS [WAS GATC Type 17]

Richard Townsend
 

Do you happen to know which railroad museum in WVA it is?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Re: WAG CARS [WAS GATC Type 17]

Schleigh Mike
 

O-41 gondolas B&O series 350000-350999 were built in the period 1931 to 1935.  I do not know the builder(s) but that is surely available from the usual sources.  One car exists, restored, in a museum down in West Virginia.  It is a model the hobby has not seen.

Mike Schleigh  Grove City, Penna.

On Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 2:01:26 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Any ideas of who built the 3202? The series 3200-3206 cars had 12 ribs, and 50-6 interior length.

Tim O'Connor





Friends,

I can't say when tank cars 200-202 came to the WAG, but they are listed in my 1958 ORER.  The WAG began operations in either 1954 or 1956 (confusingly Wikipedia offers both dates), so this is a pretty tight window for us.


A single 52' mill gondola is listed as 3000, a 140,000 lb car at 1745 cu ft and with an overall length of 55' 7" (Duryea underframe), which matches two series of ex-B&O cars (259000-260449, previously covered by Tangent, and 260500-263229, their current offering). Henry Maywald's CLASSIC FREIGHT CARS V. 6 has a photo of 3005 on page 48, which gives a build date of 1937. The new Tangent cars are very nice, but in WAG lettering are apparently too late for our period of interest without a number change to 3000.
Also listed is 3100, a 100,000 lb 50' car at 1523 cu ft with a more common overall length of 52' 7'.

Also present are "steel underframe" boxcars 4100-4103, followed 5001-5074 marked as a new addition in my book.

Here is my one souvenir of the WAG, a car I shot in Roseville around 1968. The 60XX series is not shown in my ORER.


Yours Aye,

Garth Groff

Partial shot of WAG 200
https://www.ebay.com/itm/RR-Print-Wellsville-Addison-amp-Galeton-WAG-5009-at-Galeton-Pa-6-4-1960-/123759474555?hash=item1cd0a3b77b%3Ag%3AFPQAAOSw94hc0aWp&nma=true&si=jM4eChH7Do6CPgEAYYSAj931zhg%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

Dan Smith


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

Dave Parker
 

If I were at home, I could look at my December, 1935, ORER and tell you which of the DL&W truss-rod shorties survived the 1934 purge of WUF cars.  For example, none of the B&M cars survived, but some roads did invest in UF reinforcements to extend car life.

I think consulting a later Register, say 1945 or so, yields an ambiguous answer, as shorties in general were scrapped in such large numbers in and around the WWII years.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: WAG CARS [WAS GATC Type 17]

Tim O'Connor
 


Any ideas of who built the 3202? The series 3200-3206 cars had 12 ribs, and 50-6 interior length.

Tim O'Connor





Friends,

I can't say when tank cars 200-202 came to the WAG, but they are listed in my 1958 ORER.  The WAG began operations in either 1954 or 1956 (confusingly Wikipedia offers both dates), so this is a pretty tight window for us.


A single 52' mill gondola is listed as 3000, a 140,000 lb car at 1745 cu ft and with an overall length of 55' 7" (Duryea underframe), which matches two series of ex-B&O cars (259000-260449, previously covered by Tangent, and 260500-263229, their current offering). Henry Maywald's CLASSIC FREIGHT CARS V. 6 has a photo of 3005 on page 48, which gives a build date of 1937. The new Tangent cars are very nice, but in WAG lettering are apparently too late for our period of interest without a number change to 3000.
Also listed is 3100, a 100,000 lb 50' car at 1523 cu ft with a more common overall length of 52' 7'.

Also present are "steel underframe" boxcars 4100-4103, followed 5001-5074 marked as a new addition in my book.

Here is my one souvenir of the WAG, a car I shot in Roseville around 1968. The 60XX series is not shown in my ORER.


Yours Aye,

Garth Groff

Partial shot of WAG 200
https://www.ebay.com/itm/RR-Print-Wellsville-Addison-amp-Galeton-WAG-5009-at-Galeton-Pa-6-4-1960-/123759474555?hash=item1cd0a3b77b%3Ag%3AFPQAAOSw94hc0aWp&nma=true&si=jM4eChH7Do6CPgEAYYSAj931zhg%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

Dan Smith


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: GATC Type 17

Tim O'Connor
 

The 5009 later received full lettering, wiping out the B&M's lettering.

On 5/28/2019 11:03 PM, Dan Smith wrote:
In response to Mike Schleigh,

Partial shot of WAG 200
https://www.ebay.com/itm/RR-Print-Wellsville-Addison-amp-Galeton-WAG-5009-at-Galeton-Pa-6-4-1960-/123759474555?hash=item1cd0a3b77b%3Ag%3AFPQAAOSw94hc0aWp&;nma=true&si=jM4eChH7Do6CPgEAYYSAj931zhg%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

Dan Smith
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

     From a second look I think you are right about only two truss rods on the DL&W boxcar, Eric.
Your version of the photo shows the underbody details a bit better and tells me that part of what I
Thought earlier was the continuation of the board "locking" the turnbuckles in place was actually the
closer part of the further truss rod after the board has passed through it's turnbuckle. But you suggest
the possibility of the car not having a steel underframe. If that is the case could it be that two more rods
of the same size were simply run the length of the car just to hold it together longitudaly? Look at the
casting that forms the upper part of the coupler pocket, please. The two nuts at its outer extremities
appear to be the same size as those on the truss rod ends. What else could they be doing if not holding
the entire length of the car together? A neat car, anyway you view it!

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

Tim O'Connor
 


The dock to the RIGHT in the photo is clearly a ramp going off to the right - you can see the
horizontal floor lines do not line up. The area in front of the car is slightly sloped rather than flat.
A slope is a easier for loading cars and it also sheds spilled liquids and water onto the tracks.

Tim O'


On 5/28/2019 7:08 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

I noticed the loading dock in this photo (which does feature a freight car) has a pronounced slant:

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-05-26-19/X6991.jpg

This is the first slanted loading dock I've seen. Is such a design highly unusual or just not so common?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Delivering A 1957 Chevy

Tim O'Connor
 


1971 photo but still in original paint


On 5/28/2019 4:19 PM, Schleigh Mike via Groups.Io wrote:
Model Railroader, in their September 1958 issue, presented an article on scratch building these unique cars.

Regards from Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna., in the middle of heavy weather.

On Monday, May 27, 2019, 9:50:13 PM EDT, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Photo: Delivering A 1957 Chevy
End door boxcar:
https://66.media.tumblr.com/c3b25a8a106e913adac4a0061d1acb77/tumblr_n7jd1n0aG81qcdxvpo1_1280.jpg 

Actually enclosed bi-level auto racks. These cars lacked side doors.  Sylvan once offered resin models of these early CN cars in HO scale.  CN later lengthened the design to 75 ft, and these cars were acquired by Auto-Train Corporation, later going to Amtrak.


Ben Hom
_._,_._,_

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

Bob Chaparro
 

On Wed, May 29, 2019 at 07:15 AM, Eric Hansmann wrote:
...the negative is markedthe negative is marked "Site of inspection shed DL&W electrification at Hoboken."

Actually, there is at least one other photo of a completely different scene that is marked the negative is marked "Site of inspection shed DL&W electrification at Hoboken." Maybe it's a company facility, maybe not.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: (Not A Freight Car) Slanted Loading Dock

prgm_mgr
 

Almost looks like a shed that was converted to a dock. 
Interesting details on car end and trucks too.
Mark Kraus

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