Date   
Re: Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

Eric Hansmann
 

Chuck,

I've been using cuticle scissors to cut etched parts off of the fret. I can't recall where I bought them but they look like these.

http://www.zamberg.com/zb/cuticle-scissors-inox-stainless-steel-7058i.ashx?k=GOOGLE_BASE_LIST&gclid=CKvspuO43OICFa324wcdqmwKyA


You could try using a pair of these at the very end of the running board to see if they trim the parts to your liking.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On June 8, 2019 at 6:09 PM Chuck Cover <chuck.cover@...> wrote:

I am upgrading a few models by adding Plano metal roof walks and need to shorten a few of them to fit the cars.  Has anyone had experience in cutting these metal roof walks?  What is the best way, without damaging or bending the cut end?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM

Re: Great Freight Car Combinations

gary laakso
 

Schuyler, the device is an Elesco coil type feedwater heater, a favorite of the Central of Georgia. 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 8:00 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Great Freight Car Combinations

 

Gary, here’s another look at the ERIE car, and in this view you can see both ends of the car, plus the other side of the near end.  It’s pretty clear that the steps ARE bent inwards from the usual plane of the car side.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-xxqfnfK/A

 

Schuyler

 

Interesting collection of photos to wander through.  I have another question: several of the locomotives have an oval-in-plan device at the top of the smokebox in front of the stack.  What’s that?  Some less common form of a feedwater heater?

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2019 10:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Great Freight Car Combinations

 

The nearest track features a PRR X31 boxcar and two types of flat cars and the adjoining track has what appears to be a pulp wood car, CB&Q double sheathed boxcar, a pickle car, and a 1937 GN boxcar.  Is the stirrup on the Erie boxcar bent towards the truck or is it the camera playing tricks?

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-FX2N8GC/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

Re: Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

 

I'm out of town presently but check with Plano direct. I was in the same quandary and he recommended a set of cutters that Amazon sells, that do an excellent job cutting the metal parts.

Dave Strahlendorf
Erlanger, Ky.

Re: Steel casting colors

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Townsend wrote:

Tony Thompson address’s this recently in his blog.

   Richard probably refers to a post last March, about structural steel, a material which is mostly hot rolled and maybe cold straightened. That post is here:


but a more general commentary on rust colors, and what they may or may not represent, might be this post, if you're interested:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Steel casting colors

Tony Thompson
 

Ron Merrick wrote:

For castings (or forgings) that have been outside for a few months, the color ends up being about the same for ductile iron and for carbon steel (or many of the steel alloys).  But castings that have been freshly grit blasted, then set outside, there is a pretty good variation from yellow to orange to dark rusty color.

    Those are certainly realistic rust colors, as I've described in my blog and in weathering clinics. However, not every casting or forging is left out in the weather. I have photos of some VERY large forgings on flat cars, and they are the typical bluish-gray of mill scale. Over time, they might well show rust, but not every such piece will show rust. Even freshly cast steel or cast iron does not rust right away. So I would say that modeling materials of that kind is going to depend on the vendor and the purchaser, whether the part is promptly shipped or sits around in the yard. In many cases, a grayish color would be best.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Great Freight Car Combinations

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Gary, here’s another look at the ERIE car, and in this view you can see both ends of the car, plus the other side of the near end.  It’s pretty clear that the steps ARE bent inwards from the usual plane of the car side.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-xxqfnfK/A

 

Schuyler

 

Interesting collection of photos to wander through.  I have another question: several of the locomotives have an oval-in-plan device at the top of the smokebox in front of the stack.  What’s that?  Some less common form of a feedwater heater?

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2019 10:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Great Freight Car Combinations

 

The nearest track features a PRR X31 boxcar and two types of flat cars and the adjoining track has what appears to be a pulp wood car, CB&Q double sheathed boxcar, a pickle car, and a 1937 GN boxcar.  Is the stirrup on the Erie boxcar bent towards the truck or is it the camera playing tricks?

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-FX2N8GC/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

Re: Great Freight Car Combinations

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Gary. I think that sill step on the ERIE car IS bent inwards . . . look at the step on the other side . . . but I also think that it’s been bent lengthwise, too, so you’re getting a sort of double whammy of bending

 

Clearly, you observed that rather fuzzy photo closely!

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2019 10:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Great Freight Car Combinations

 

The nearest track features a PRR X31 boxcar and two types of flat cars and the adjoining track has what appears to be a pulp wood car, CB&Q double sheathed boxcar, a pickle car, and a 1937 GN boxcar.  Is the stirrup on the Erie boxcar bent towards the truck or is it the camera playing tricks?

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-FX2N8GC/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

Great Freight Car Combinations

gary laakso
 

The nearest track features a PRR X31 boxcar and two types of flat cars and the adjoining track has what appears to be a pulp wood car, CB&Q double sheathed boxcar, a pickle car, and a 1937 GN boxcar.  Is the stirrup on the Erie boxcar bent towards the truck or is it the camera playing tricks?

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-FX2N8GC/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

Re: Steel casting colors

Richard Townsend
 

Tony Thompson address’s this recently in his blog.


On Jun 8, 2019, at 6:25 PM, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

For castings (or forgings) that have been outside for a few months, the color ends up being about the same for ductile iron and for carbon steel (or many of the steel alloys).  But castings that have been freshly grit blasted, then set outside, there is a pretty good variation from yellow to orange to dark rusty color.

Ron Merrick

Re: Photo: Unloading DeSotos

rwitt_2000
 

The railroad would have been the IC; its Freeport IL to Madison WI line.

According to Google maps the car dealership building still stands.

Bob Witt

Pullman Library Freight Car Drawings

David
 

This one could be interesting:
SS-45602.tif?? Vulcan Corrugated Steel End - 1921 - 200 BAR Box Cars

David Thompson

Re: Steel casting colors

mopacfirst
 

For castings (or forgings) that have been outside for a few months, the color ends up being about the same for ductile iron and for carbon steel (or many of the steel alloys).  But castings that have been freshly grit blasted, then set outside, there is a pretty good variation from yellow to orange to dark rusty color.

Ron Merrick

Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

Chuck Cover
 

I am upgrading a few models by adding Plano metal roof walks and need to shorten a few of them to fit the cars.  Has anyone had experience in cutting these metal roof walks?  What is the best way, without damaging or bending the cut end?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM

Steel casting colors

Brian Carlson
 

Have a few loads to paint. Need an idea for color for a steel casting load. Dark rusty red color, dark brown-black i see in ductile iron water main fittings at work, other? I realize what is seen today may not be what was circa 1957.


Brian J. Carlson

Re: Pullman Library Freight Car Drawings

Bob Webber
 

I have added the Haskell & Barker & the Pullman/Pullman Standard drawings.  Note that there are missing captions in the HB list - that has to be looked into - rather than delete them, I kept them because, well, I'm busy doing other things - you can always filter or sort. 

A couple of points:
I did not pre-spell check this version - it's rawer than the last.
It is not sorted - I figured than anyone using it will sort or filter as they wish.
It is saved as an XLS file type
Note - the file name has changed - as did the description.  If you still see Standard Steel - you have an old cached version, and you'll need to reload.  If you used Jeff's method, the file will no longer be there. 

This process (and the response) has been a bit eye-opening as I had though this part of the process had gone firly well - in that I thought we had captions for every thing.  We do not (or it didn't resolve correctly - TBD).

Again, these are only the drawings scanned - mostly as a result of orders, though I have started scanning entire folders.  .  These 3 list segments are a tiny proportion of the available drawings, and we are trying to process more, as time allows. 

I thought that even in the raw form, it might hep people see what might be available for projects down the road. 

Thanks for the comments!

http://www.pullmanlibrary.org/

(And yes, fonts & such need cleaning up on the page)

Bob Webber

Re: Standard Steel Freight Cars - Experiment (corrected)

Bob Webber
 

Thanks, Dan.

This is a temporary version - I plan on putting another out in the "near" future that contains more data - and will likely be a PDF with an xls alternative. 

The reason there is no order info is that these were early scans - and we didn't realize at that time if it would be important (I say we - I wasn't there).  This is a 20 year effort - you learn a lot in 20 years.  That means, also means 20 years of orders - each order teaches us a lot about what customers want - and are looking for.  We are slowly back filling data - if it is present.  many drawings have no order infor (which you can see on the list - I've taken to adding that phrase rather than leaving that part of the caption empty). 

There are a *LOT* of early cars that may be of interest.  Cement covered hoppers in the late 20s, 3 bay 50-ton open hoppers, various Duryea underframed cars (and who knew that some hoppers have parts also used on box cars (aside from trucks and such).  There is even the USRA box if you look through the list.  There are export cars, trench cars, cabooses, etc.

What I plan on doing - if the interest is there - is to include the Pullman freight, the H&B freight and perhaps some others that may be of interest.  That spans from about 1900 to 1960ish. 

The exact nature of the drawings is, in this case at least, less important than the possibilities in the orders/Lots.  By seeing that there are specific orders for specific railroads available - even if the given drawing is for a striking plate - that is important for those researching cars.  They then have a good chance of finding other, ore critical drawings for their work for the cars referenced. 

We started by putting EXACTLY what was in the data block.  THAT was, I think, a mistake.  The various manufacturers were no more standard or consistent than, well, us.   I did a quick search before posting to make some things a bit more so - you have NO idea how many abbreviations for "arrangement" there were!  Same with railroads.  AT&SF may be Santa Fe, ATSF, AT&SF, or variants.  THAT'S what we had been entering (because that's what was on the drawing).  I've changed that policy to do just as you suggest - put the reporting marks, not the name or variations.  Search for CRI&P stuff, you have to look for Rock, CRIP, CRIP, etc.  That has to change. 

MANY General Drawings have multiple associations - and when they did - no road name was provided (were it for many),  So, they can be ...entertaining...to research.  But...this is exactly why I wanted to post this - to get ideas and explain our process and then meld it all together so that we have a more useful product when we put a searchable data base on the web. 

We are VERY much restrained by the agreement with Bombardier (they own 85-90% of the collection).  That may change

At 06:23 AM 6/8/2019, D R Stinson wrote:
Bob -
A truly impressive effort, as limited as it might be. Congratulations on bringing light to the holdings of the library!

The first comment I would make is to save the file in the most easily accessible software format possible for those who may not have Excel. I would suggest staying with the XLS format rather than going to the XLSX format. The newer (and more exclusive) format most likely doesn't gain you anything, and people with older spreadsheet programs might run into an obstacle with it. Just a suggestion from someone who does not typically use M$ Excel.

While it is most likely necessary, make certain that the compression program you use to zip files continues to function correctly in the future. I have found that to be a problem with some older compressions in early versions of MS software. Just an observation.

Some of the first entries do not mention specific road names, car series, or types. This may be something that simply wasn't on the drawings or wasn't picked up when those drawings were scanned. Again, an observation.

While it may be too late for some, it might be useful if the road initials were in a separate, sortable column to facilitate locating specific cars.

And it appears you DO have something of interest to me! SS-16294.tif appears to be one of the early BA&P two-bay hoppers, although it might be one of the earlier cars, which would still be of interest.

Regarding reporting marks, I notice that some of the initials have spaces in them. the above-mentioned drawing refers to "B A & P Hopper car" with spaces between the initials. If I'm searching for a reporting mark I don't put in spaces because the railroads and the equipment registers didn't. In this case it would be more useful to use "BA&P". Note that this may simply be a typo. Personally I favor leaving in the ampersand (&), as it is correct for the era, but it's not unreasonable to do a second search if it's not there. Where road names are spelled out, such as "General drawing  of 60000 lbs. cap stock car Bangor & Aroostook", it would be helpful to have reporting marks following the name for searching. This might help avoid spelling errors derailing a search.

Just some quick thought. Again, congratulations on such an effort!!

Dan Stinson
Helena, Montana


Bob Webber

Re: Standard Steel Freight Cars - Experiment (corrected)

 

Bob -
A truly impressive effort, as limited as it might be. Congratulations on bringing light to the holdings of the library!

The first comment I would make is to save the file in the most easily accessible software format possible for those who may not have Excel. I would suggest staying with the XLS format rather than going to the XLSX format. The newer (and more exclusive) format most likely doesn't gain you anything, and people with older spreadsheet programs might run into an obstacle with it. Just a suggestion from someone who does not typically use M$ Excel.

While it is most likely necessary, make certain that the compression program you use to zip files continues to function correctly in the future. I have found that to be a problem with some older compressions in early versions of MS software. Just an observation.

Some of the first entries do not mention specific road names, car series, or types. This may be something that simply wasn't on the drawings or wasn't picked up when those drawings were scanned. Again, an observation.

While it may be too late for some, it might be useful if the road initials were in a separate, sortable column to facilitate locating specific cars.

And it appears you DO have something of interest to me! SS-16294.tif appears to be one of the early BA&P two-bay hoppers, although it might be one of the earlier cars, which would still be of interest.

Regarding reporting marks, I notice that some of the initials have spaces in them. the above-mentioned drawing refers to "B A & P Hopper car" with spaces between the initials. If I'm searching for a reporting mark I don't put in spaces because the railroads and the equipment registers didn't. In this case it would be more useful to use "BA&P". Note that this may simply be a typo. Personally I favor leaving in the ampersand (&), as it is correct for the era, but it's not unreasonable to do a second search if it's not there. Where road names are spelled out, such as "General drawing of 60000 lbs. cap stock car Bangor & Aroostook", it would be helpful to have reporting marks following the name for searching. This might help avoid spelling errors derailing a search.

Just some quick thought. Again, congratulations on such an effort!!

Dan Stinson
Helena, Montana

Re: "Machinist Tools For Modeling, Part 1 - Hand Tools" Clinic ar rent NERPM

Bill Welch
 

I am pretty sure at that price those are the counterfeits people are complaining about in the Amazon reviews for the one I ordered: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IG46NL2?ref=ppx_pt2_dt_b_prod_image

Bill Welch

Re: "Machinist Tools For Modeling, Part 1 - Hand Tools" Clinic ar rent NERPM

Todd Horton
 

New Mitutoyo calipers for $30 ??    There’s you sign 


On Jun 7, 2019, at 9:00 PM, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend@...> wrote:

So I'm seeing "Mitutoyo" digital calipers on eBay for anywhere from $0.99 to over $100.00. Many are about $30.00. Are the $30.00 ones suspect?

Re: Standard Steel Freight Cars - Experiment (corrected)

Aley, Jeff A
 

It seems easier to just provide the link here:

 

http://www.pullmanlibrary.org/SS%20Freight%20Folder-Contents.xlsx

 

You’ll probably want to right-click and “Save As” because this link is not to a webpage, but to an Excel spreadsheet.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of al.kresse
Sent: Friday, June 07, 2019 5:19 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Standard Steel Freight Cars - Experiment (corrected)

 

Now it works! Thanks!

 

On June 7, 2019 at 7:45 PM Bob Webber <rgz17@...> wrote:

Many of you know me - I am Bob Webber, current Curator of the Pullman Library in Beautiful Downtown Union, IL.  Data on our Library can be found on the IRM web site:
https://www.irm.org/pullmanlibrary/

MANY years ago, I created a "shadow" web site because we could not get ANYTHING changed, posted or deleted on the official one - hence the link at the bottom.

For years people have been asking if we can provide a list of all the drawings we had.  We could not - there simply is no index. 

On the other hand, we have a few drawings scanned.  In one particular stretch - basically in 1928-1930 - we've been busily scanning drawings.  So now there is about 1% scanned, or about 2800 drawings. But they give a fairly good cross section of types of drawings in these years.  (Note, these years are encompassed by drawings from about SS-53000 to SS-55000) .

The list that will be linked in this e-mail is an experiment and a call for comments.  Note that this list is just that - drawing number & caption.  No sample drawings, no other information. 

We know there are errors, typos, and such - bound to be after some 50,000 drawings of all types have been scanned & metadata added.  Too, the roughly 15 years that is represented on our part was a learnign curve as we had to learn what was important, how to use the software, etc.

I'll leave off the "FAQ" I did on another list - if there are comments, questions, hate mail, etc. remember one thing.  DO NOT CALL.  The Library's phone system is about as stable as a rat in a meth lab.  Sometimes we get it, and it works beautifully (usually for spam phone calls) customer phone calls, not so much.   Use the IO, Comcast or the Pullman Library's gmail account irmpulllib&gm***.c** (asterisks to be replaced by real stuff by you, the reader).  Note.  DO NOT USE the IRM E-mail that has been set up because...you guessed  it - that too is hosed.  At times well over the limit set, at other times I simply do not get the mail, and at other times, it forwards only half of it.  So...there is that (or not).

Anyway...here is a slightly upgraded version of the freight car list (heh) for your perusal - I can answer questions as will others - you likely should keep the more personal, attacking and/or specific questions to the above accounts and not litter the list.

http://www.pullmanlibrary.org/


(The list can be found almost at the bottom of this index - which otw has not been updated since ..well...a long time)

Bob Webber