Date   

Re: Great Freight Car Combinations

Tom Madden
 

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019 at 04:07 PM, Jack Mullen wrote:
On Sat, Jun 8, 2019 at 08:00 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

It’s pretty clear that the steps ARE bent inwards from the usual plane of the car side.

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-xxqfnfK/A

Indeed, and if you look around in the photo Schuyler linked, you'll see steps on the Rio Grande and WLE boxcars are also bent inward. Must be operating on a club layout. ("Huh, THAT isn't very sturdy! I build MY cars to OPERATE.")

Seriously, once to start looking, you'll see these a lot. The bend is by design, not damage (though that happens too). It's a consequence of the inward taper of the clearance envelope below the level of the side sill.  When the inside width of house cars expanded to 9'2", width over the side sills became about 9'10".  But the bottom of the step is at a height of 2' or a couple inches less ATR , where the max width has reduced to about 9'8".  
Attached is a photo showing two views of an undamaged sill step on D&RGW Pressed Steel boxcar 69332 showing the designed-in bend. It's the step on the right. Pierre offers this step, Yarmouth part #YMW-216.

Tom Madden


Re: Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

Chuck Cover
 

To the group, thanks for all the tips on how to cut the Plano metal roof walks. 

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: Brake Housings

Bill Welch
 

The AB brake set Pierre refers to was tooled by Grandt Line and packaged by both GL and DA.

Bill Welch


Re: Brake Housings

Pierre Oliver
 

It's the same AB sprue that was in the GS gon kits

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 6/09/19 6:48 p.m., Nelson Moyer wrote:

Pierre, I don’t think DA makes a sprue with four brake housings on a single sprue. Maybe the sprue you have is Moloco? I attached a picture of the Moloco brake housings.

 

Nelson Moyer


Brake Housings

Nelson Moyer
 

Pierre, I don’t think DA makes a sprue with four brake housings on a single sprue. Maybe the sprue you have is Moloco? I attached a picture of the Moloco brake housings.

 

Nelson Moyer


Re: DA AB brake detail sprue

Nelson Moyer
 

I have DA 6403 URECO, DA 6402 Miner, and DA 6401 Equipco. You're probably looking at those in addition to Ajax.

Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pierre Oliver
Sent: Sunday, June 09, 2019 5:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] DA AB brake detail sprue

Hello all.
I'm looking at a AB brake sprue from DA.
On it are 4 handbrake housings on the sprue, The Ajax is obvious, but I'm having trouble identifying the 3.
Help please

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


Re: Great Freight Car Combinations

Jack Mullen
 

On Sat, Jun 8, 2019 at 08:00 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

It’s pretty clear that the steps ARE bent inwards from the usual plane of the car side.

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-xxqfnfK/A

Indeed, and if you look around in the photo Schuyler linked, you'll see steps on the Rio Grande and WLE boxcars are also bent inward. Must be operating on a club layout. ("Huh, THAT isn't very sturdy! I build MY cars to OPERATE.")

Seriously, once to start looking, you'll see these a lot. The bend is by design, not damage (though that happens too). It's a consequence of the inward taper of the clearance envelope below the level of the side sill.  When the inside width of house cars expanded to 9'2", width over the side sills became about 9'10".  But the bottom of the step is at a height of 2' or a couple inches less ATR , where the max width has reduced to about 9'8".  

Jack Mullen


DA AB brake detail sprue

Pierre Oliver
 

Hello all.
I'm looking at a AB brake sprue from DA.
On it are 4 handbrake housings on the sprue, The Ajax is obvious, but I'm having trouble identifying the 3.
Help please

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


Re: Pullman Library Freight Car Drawings

Bob Webber
 

David, the file names (the left column) is in 3 parts - the "SS-" indicates Standard Steel.   The 45602 indicates the Standard Steel Drawing Number.  The .tif is the file type we scan & store the files as.  Hence the SS-45602.tif is the full file name for the scan of that drawing.  Which is itself  "traced from C.C.C.R. Co.  Print 2704-D" - it shows the end of the specific type along with posts that support it behind and the manner in which the end is fastened to the roof (or vice-versa).  It is a 35" x 19" original on linen. 

Scanned this May - would likely would never be scanned  (in an order-driven process).  There are all sorts of interesting ends, roofs, trucks and such - and hundreds of small parts - that wouldn't normally have been scanned. The main reason I have been scanning these is precisely that they wouldn't normally be ordered - and I wanted to present a nice "cross section" of drawing types; as well as railroad orders. 

The plan is to obtain a collections management system, use the information we have been entering as a feed to it and present a searchable object on the web. 

Towards that end too, we've been creating a "database (sic)" of assets (manuals, photos, negatives, documents, film, indexes, etc.) for the same purpose.  Who knows we have hundreds of Trailmobile negatives?  Dating to *very* early in the company (1900s)?  Or EMD marine and maritime (portable) prime mover manuals?  Or WW I trench equipment drawings?  Or Images of the test center in Hammond for freight equipment; loading of tanks & equipment built in the plants (as well as testing those vehicles); bombs & shells; ship drawings; Plant drawings and photos; freight car scheme proposals; Vendor drawings,  etc. - along with the "normal" freight & passenger car equipment drawings.

And...in terms of freight cars - 95% of drawings, Images & data *IS* Steam era. 


At 08:27 PM 6/8/2019, David via Groups.Io wrote:
This one could be interesting:
SS-45602.tif?? Vulcan Corrugated Steel End - 1921 - 200 BAR Box Cars

David Thompson

Bob Webber


Carrying Automobiles In Boxcars

Bob Chaparro
 

Many vintage (and more modern) photos from the Industrial History Blog:

http://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/2016/03/carrying-automobiles-in-boxcars.html

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


New Measuring Tool

Bill Welch
 

As I noted recently Ryan Mendell's "Machinist Hand Tools Clinic: Part One" can be expensive‚ LOL. Reminder he will be doing at Lisle/Chicagoland nest.

I decided to go with a Mitutoyo Digital caliper and purchased it from Amazon on Friday and it was here on Saturday. My decision was based mainly on the fact that I am collaborating on designing a new resin kit and on my last collaboration—the Yarmouth tank car—my confidence reading my dial caliper was so low I sent photos of what the dial said to my collaborator in Germany. This time my collaborator has the very same Mitutoyo Digital caliper and I can just read what the litt
le screen says and send it to him. To me being confident of what I am doing is worth the price. Much discussion around the fact that the Mitutoyo calipers are counterfeited and can be found for $30 so I was careful in looking at the details and specs. Returns are easy with Amazon and I was confident I was getting the real thing. The photos show what the packaging looks like. The brown sheet of paper in the factory wrapping of the caliper is imbedded with a rust inhibiter and obviously the battery comes separate. The storage case is robust and it is easy to tell which side is up.

Bill Welch


Machinist Tools For Modeling-calipers

Andy Carlson
 

I purchased a digital caliper many years ago and whenever I see it, I am reminded that it has never been removed from its packaging.

I have two stainless dial calipers, plus one plastic one kept near the computer for spur-of-the moment measurements.

One of my dial calipers has had some fine filing done to sharpen one of the anvil's inside edge. This sharpened edge is used for scribing styrene sheets when I am cutting styrene parts. I quickly figured the correction adjustment when scribing which allows the cuts to be made at the correct point. It is a quickly learned adjustment.

I suppose that the reason I have never opened the digital is that it is totally unnecessary, as the dial calipers are so easy to read (and accurate), and I don't seem to have any problems with misreading any of my measurements.

As a famous metalurgyst (I spelled that wrong, didn't I?) once stated "YMMV".
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: "Machinist Tools For Modeling, Part 1 - Hand Tools" Clinic ar rent NERPM

vapeurchapelon
 

Up to date I never understood the move to digital calipers for hobby purposes. Eyes getting worse with age is the first credible explanation for me. I just don't trust those digital things. I have had two failures with them, both showing real crap at the display after some time of usage. (Don't know the make anymore.) I realized this as the display value was WAAAYYYY off the real value - several mm! But what with errors in the decimal digits?
I just don't trust them, and I have a very old-school analog caliper wich works forever and is precisely enough for my hobby efforts.

Many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953

Gesendet: Freitag, 07. Juni 2019 um 19:01 Uhr
Von: "Denny Anspach" <danspachmd@gmail.com>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] "Machinist Tools For Modeling, Part 1 - Hand Tools" Clinic ar rent NERPM

Jack Burgess hit it on the head when he points out that you get what you pay for: the Harbor Freight and similar are commodity grade or less calipers and if one is into disposable instruments, these can certainly be useful.

I have six calipers, Mititoyo, Helios (German), Brown & …..? (Swiss), none of them new, all extremely accurate, and none…none at all depending on batteries. I use dial calipers routinely, but use only vernier calipers to check on critical measurements. I learned my lesson on the latter some years ago when I found to my chagrin that I could find no one, nada, zip, that would even consider, much less touch a repair on any of the digital calipers (“throw them out”). I also learned that to a man, the fine instrument repair shops use only vernier calipers to check accuracy in their work.

My core instruments are almost all the very best I can find, and in that regard, they have paid, and continue to pay for themselves in accuracy, wear, longevity, and usefulness over the years- the ultimate economy.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA





Re: Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

Tim O'Connor
 

cut (nippers) while holding the edge where you are cutting with flat pliers or a strong clamp. then file
the cut edge while still clamped or held with pliers. then there should be no deformation.

On 6/8/2019 8:09 PM, Chuck Cover wrote:
I am upgrading a few models by adding Plano metal roof walks and need to shorten a few of them to fit the cars.  Has anyone had experience in cutting these metal roof walks?  What is the best way, without damaging or bending the cut end?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Micro-Mark’s photo-etch scissors work well. For major cuts I also sometimes use a little 7” sheet-metal shear/brake. Any such tool needs to be kept sharp and tight to get a clean cut on such thin material. Even then a little clean-up with a fine stone or Sil-carbide sanding-paddle is often needed.

Dan Mitchell
========== 

On Jun 9, 2019, at 8:56 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Chuck,

I've been using cuticle scissors to cut etched parts off of the fret. I can't recall where I bought them but they look like these.

http://www.zamberg.com/zb/cuticle-scissors-inox-stainless-steel-7058i.ashx?k=GOOGLE_BASE_LIST&gclid=CKvspuO43OICFa324wcdqmwKyA


You could try using a pair of these at the very end of the running board to see if they trim the parts to your liking.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On June 8, 2019 at 6:09 PM Chuck Cover <chuck.cover@...> wrote:

I am upgrading a few models by adding Plano metal roof walks and need to shorten a few of them to fit the cars.  Has anyone had experience in cutting these metal roof walks?  What is the best way, without damaging or bending the cut end?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM



Re: Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

Eric Hansmann
 

Chuck,

I've been using cuticle scissors to cut etched parts off of the fret. I can't recall where I bought them but they look like these.

http://www.zamberg.com/zb/cuticle-scissors-inox-stainless-steel-7058i.ashx?k=GOOGLE_BASE_LIST&gclid=CKvspuO43OICFa324wcdqmwKyA


You could try using a pair of these at the very end of the running board to see if they trim the parts to your liking.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On June 8, 2019 at 6:09 PM Chuck Cover <chuck.cover@...> wrote:

I am upgrading a few models by adding Plano metal roof walks and need to shorten a few of them to fit the cars.  Has anyone had experience in cutting these metal roof walks?  What is the best way, without damaging or bending the cut end?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM


Re: Great Freight Car Combinations

gary laakso
 

Schuyler, the device is an Elesco coil type feedwater heater, a favorite of the Central of Georgia. 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 8:00 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Great Freight Car Combinations

 

Gary, here’s another look at the ERIE car, and in this view you can see both ends of the car, plus the other side of the near end.  It’s pretty clear that the steps ARE bent inwards from the usual plane of the car side.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-xxqfnfK/A

 

Schuyler

 

Interesting collection of photos to wander through.  I have another question: several of the locomotives have an oval-in-plan device at the top of the smokebox in front of the stack.  What’s that?  Some less common form of a feedwater heater?

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2019 10:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Great Freight Car Combinations

 

The nearest track features a PRR X31 boxcar and two types of flat cars and the adjoining track has what appears to be a pulp wood car, CB&Q double sheathed boxcar, a pickle car, and a 1937 GN boxcar.  Is the stirrup on the Erie boxcar bent towards the truck or is it the camera playing tricks?

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-Columbus-Georgia/i-FX2N8GC/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 


Re: Best way to cut Plano metal roof walks

 

I'm out of town presently but check with Plano direct. I was in the same quandary and he recommended a set of cutters that Amazon sells, that do an excellent job cutting the metal parts.

Dave Strahlendorf
Erlanger, Ky.


Re: Steel casting colors

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Townsend wrote:

Tony Thompson address’s this recently in his blog.

   Richard probably refers to a post last March, about structural steel, a material which is mostly hot rolled and maybe cold straightened. That post is here:


but a more general commentary on rust colors, and what they may or may not represent, might be this post, if you're interested:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Steel casting colors

Tony Thompson
 

Ron Merrick wrote:

For castings (or forgings) that have been outside for a few months, the color ends up being about the same for ductile iron and for carbon steel (or many of the steel alloys).  But castings that have been freshly grit blasted, then set outside, there is a pretty good variation from yellow to orange to dark rusty color.

    Those are certainly realistic rust colors, as I've described in my blog and in weathering clinics. However, not every casting or forging is left out in the weather. I have photos of some VERY large forgings on flat cars, and they are the typical bluish-gray of mill scale. Over time, they might well show rust, but not every such piece will show rust. Even freshly cast steel or cast iron does not rust right away. So I would say that modeling materials of that kind is going to depend on the vendor and the purchaser, whether the part is promptly shipped or sits around in the yard. In many cases, a grayish color would be best.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





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