Date   
One crew member needed for June 29th op session on the Alma branch

Jared Harper
 

I need one person to fill out the train crew for the June 29th op session on the Alma branch.
Lunch at noon; train runs at 1:00.

Jared Harper
420 Woodward Way
Athens, GA 30606
706-543-8821

Re: Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

Jon Miller
 

On 6/15/2019 6:28 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:
I speculating originally black, and then painted red on repaints.

    Speaking of paints has anyone tried Tamiya color lacquer paint?  If so thoughts?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

Aley, Jeff A
 

Hi Garth,

 

               You asked if Wilson was a car supplier, packer, or both.  They were definitely a packer, and they also leased cars FROM others.  My VERY brief glance at available info (see below) did not reveal anything about leasing cars TO others; perhaps this was a car Wilson formerly leased from General American /  Northwestern / North American that hadn’t been repainted.

 

There is probably more info to be gained from a careful reading of “Meat Reefers – a History” by Martin Lofton, published in Symposium on Railroad History Vol 2, edited by Antony W. Thompson, and published by A. C. Kalmbach Memorial Library, NMRA, Chattanooga, TN.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Garth Groff
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 2:16 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

 

One of the Wilson cars is lettered WCLX, but under lease to Schuyler Packing Co. and carries their herald. Question for discussion: Was Wilson a car supplier, a packer, or both?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

 

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

Aley, Jeff A
 

Denny,

Sounds like you married upwards. Good choice!

Regards,

-Jeff

-----Original Message-----

I was once employed in the Morrell plant deep in the sub basement steaming tank room (130º) beneath the killing floor, or in the hide cellar (a different kind of hell), while the manager’s lovely daughter Diane did filing in AC comfort in his offices far above. Now 65 years later, she is now my wife, and we do recall those memorable days of our differing stations in life. When I ask her for recall details, all she can recall is that “Daddy was always on the teletype selling car loads of beef”.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

Denny Anspach
 

Wilson Packing: Wilson had a large beef packing house in Albert Lea, MN, and I recall lines of yellow Wilson reefers adjacent. The plant was a major underpinning for the town’s economy. I have not knowledge of how to where they marketed their beef. The plant was directly adjacent to the Milwaukee line west to Madison, SD and east to LaCrescent, MN/La Crosse, WI, and to the Rock Island’s “spine line” north to twin cities and south to Kansas City and Texas (the M& St. L was also there with direct connections via the Illinois Central to Chicago). My special memory of Wilson was when the plant manager, a family friend came to visit and fish, he always brought a prime rib roast as a house gift.

Meat Reefer Routing: This has been discussed off and on in the past, and it is always interesting. The once nearby large Morrell beef packing plant in Estherville, IA (originally a Tobin plant [Albany, NY]) marketed all of their beef to the east coast, primarily NYC and Boston, allowing the premium fresh cold beef quarters ( five or six days old when loaded into the reefers) to further age en route. I do know that one of the means of marketing was through brokers who would buy the meat while actually en route via teletype. The Morrell Plant manager, had primary responsibility for this marketing and he would begin his day about 4-5 am negotiating meat sales with east coast brokers, apparently necessitating a diversion of reefers already on the road to differing final destinations.

I was once employed in the Morrell plant deep in the sub basement steaming tank room (130º) beneath the killing floor, or in the hide cellar (a different kind of hell), while the manager’s lovely daughter Diane did filing in AC comfort in his offices far above. Now 65 years later, she is now my wife, and we do recall those memorable days of our differing stations in life. When I ask her for recall details, all she can recall is that “Daddy was always on the teletype selling car loads of beef”.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA

Re: Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

William Hirt
 

How true. I was just doing some research this past week for a friend who is modeling the South Omaha Terminal in 1959. I came across a picture in Bill Kratville's book Railroads of Omaha and Council Bluffs. The 1950 picture shows an elevated timber loading platform on the SOT where the manure from the Omaha Stockyards was loaded into UP drop bottom gondolas to be moved to Avery, Nebraska, for disposal or dispersal. The Omaha Stockyards was handling 45,000 head of livestock a day then, so there was a lot of it. I wrote my friend that just begs to be modeled (without the odor of course!).

Bill Hirt

On 6/15/2019 7:58 AM, Steve and Barb Hile wrote:
Sure.  They had to do something with the hides.  The motto for the stockyards/packing houses was "Everything but the squeal."



_._,_._,_

Re: Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks for the photos and blog link, Doug. I have enough information now to finish painting the two 6700 series and one 2500 series cars under construction. All three will be in the red scheme.

 

Nelson Moyer

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Why sigh?  Aren’t you glad modelers are asking the right questions and seeking answers with data and not just taking what manufacturers offer? Do you expect everyone to have been a friend of Hendrickson or have Breyer’s photo stash?

Rejoice that your message was heard and people come here looking for answers. Don’t be THAT guy.

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

--
____________________________
David Bott, modeling the A&Y in '34

Re: Meat Reefer routing

Douglas Harding
 

The large major meat packers all had branch houses. Armour and Swift had hundreds. These were places that received hanging meat, ie carcasses, in company reefers, from the company slaughter houses. The carcasses were then processed, ie cut into meat cuts, for distribution to meat buyers. Think grocery warehouses, meat markets, hotel and restaurant concerns and institutions like schools, prisons, military base, etc. Many of the branch houses had a fleet of delivery trucks.

 

In addition to branch houses, hanging meat was also shipped directly to places like grocery warehouses, where the carcasses were processed. Think of anyone purchasing large quantities of meat.

 

For operations a branch house only received reefers from the company slaughter house: ie Swift to Swift, Armour to Armour, etc. But a private buyer, like a grocery warehouse or military based could receive reefers from many different slaughter houses. If you want to run a string of Armour reefers, then model an Armour branch house. But if you want to run a variety of meat reefers, then model a cold storage building or an grocery warehouse, or perhaps a commissary for the military or railroad.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Barry
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 7:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Meat Reefer routing

 

Obviously meat reefers were routed from the large packing houses to the distributors, but who were the distributors? I'm beginning to think that the large brands such as Swift, Cudahay, etc. shipped to their own distributor network who then sold to grocers, butchers and other wholesalers locally.  I base this partly on the 1943 Oakland City Directory listing for Meat Wholesalers which includes Cudahay at 222 3rd street, right on the WP line into Oakland.  It is in an industrial area with no room for a stock yard, just inland from the Santa Fe's Alice Street facilities.  Swift is several blocks west on the WP line at 312 Clay Street.  Morrell is between them on the next street toward the water at 364 2nd Street.  These distributorship facilities may give you a reason to include your favorite meat reefer on your layout, even if they didn't have a slaughterhouse and stockyards.

 

 

 

John Barry

 

ATSF North Bay Lines 

Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

Lovettsville, VA

 

707-490-9696 

 

PO Box 44736 

Washington, DC 20026-4736

 

 

On Saturday, June 15, 2019, 8:23:22 AM EDT, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

 

 

Not to derail the paint discussion, but I just noticed that both of these reefers have, on the roof, the characteristic angle just outboard of the hatches that was standard on ART cars.  They also have the characteristic horizontal seam.

Were these cars built by ACF (or someone else) to an ART design?

Ron Merrick

Re: Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

Douglas Harding
 

Nelson the photo I have of a 6700 Swift reefer is BW. It appears that sill steps are red, when compared to the plate under the door. Attached is a photo of 4863 in red. Also attached is a Swift ad showing a yellow car.

 

On red cars the plate under the door was always black. End sills are red. Photos show sill steps were black or red. I speculating originally black, and then painted red on repaints.

 

https://myp48.wordpress.com/2017/07/16/prototype-swift-wood-reefers/

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 11:49 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

 

I’m building two Sunshine 6700 series reefers, and I only have two photos of these cars, both in black and white. SRLX 6723 is painted in the yellow banner scheme, and it’s clear that the underframe cover plates and sill steps are yellow, while the rest of the underframe is black. SRLX 6714 is painted in the red scheme, and it’s not possible to determine if the color plates and sill steps are red or black. I can’t tell if the end sills are red or black. I’d appreciate information about the red paint scheme for this car and any color photos available.

 

Nelson Moyer

Re: Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

Nelson Moyer
 

Wilson operated a large packing plant in Oklahoma City in the 1970s, but I don’t know when it opened or closed. A friend who worked for IBM designed and maintained their computer system as a full time job for years. He told me his first task was to learn all about the meat packing industry so he would understand their needs. There may be information about the plant and perhaps photos in Oklahoma City and/or Oklahoma State archives.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

Nelson Moyer
 

OK, Wilson started out more yellow-orange than orange, but that’s not consortium reefer yellow. I have some yellow cars (WFE, FGE, and BRE) that I should have included in the comparison photo for reference. Consortium cars started out yellow and either faded (wood cars mostly) or moved toward Armour yellow. Stan displayed several consortium cars at the St. Louis RPM shortly before he passed away, and I asked him that color he use on the BREX cars. His answer was Armour yellow. I’ve since learned that Armour yellow represents cars that have been in service a while and gotten dirty, because new paint was more like Scalecoat reefer yellow. I’ve been painting new consortium cars Tru Color WFE Reefer Yellow on the assumption that FGE and BRE used the same paint colors as WFE, and the Tru color paint was matched to a color chip. A attached a couple of photos showing a car painted with WFE reefer yellow and Tru Color Armour yellow (car obviously not finished), along with the Rapido Swift car posted earlier. Reefer in service photos depend upon lights, camera (film), and action ; )

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

 


Sigh.



On 6/14/2019 8:31 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

Here are three variations on reefer orange and reefer yellow. The Wilson car is definitely orange. The Scalecoat II 1 to 5 mix approximates the Wilson color. The Kingan car is medium orange-yellow, and the Swift car is light orange-yellow (actually more orange than the photo shows, but not as orange as the Kingan car). Lights are 5000 K. The swift car isn’t a bright reefer yellow but yellow with a hint of orange. I think Rapido did a better job of color matching than Atlas.

 

Nelson Moyer

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

Peter Ness
 

Tim, stop muddying the waters.  One of those cars is a Wilson WCLX while the other is clearly a Wilson & Co. WCLX.  They are horses (or meat reefers) of a different color from the get-go  8-p

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 7:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

 


Sigh.



On 6/14/2019 8:31 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

Here are three variations on reefer orange and reefer yellow. The Wilson car is definitely orange. The Scalecoat II 1 to 5 mix approximates the Wilson color. The Kingan car is medium orange-yellow, and the Swift car is light orange-yellow (actually more orange than the photo shows, but not as orange as the Kingan car). Lights are 5000 K. The swift car isn’t a bright reefer yellow but yellow with a hint of orange. I think Rapido did a better job of color matching than Atlas.

 

Nelson Moyer

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Sure.  They had to do something with the hides.  The motto for the stockyards/packing houses was "Everything but the squeal."

Steve Hile

-----Original Message-----
From: Peter Ness
Sent: Jun 15, 2019 7:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

Thank you, Garth.

 

I’ve come across very little reference information on Wilson & Co., so can’t provide any insight on possible car supplier operations.  From photographic evidence at least in the late 1950’s Wilson & Co reefers appear to be only slightly less present than Swift cars in Southern New England. Armour, Cudahy and others a distant third in appearance. There are numerous photos of blocks of Wilson & Co cars and also Swift cars on the New Haven’s Maybrook Line which would be the westward connection to Chicago. Likewise photos of single cars (Swift or Wilson & Co) in switching moves at local packing houses. Not so much for other meet packers. 

 

Unlike produce reefers, not many meet reefers appear in overview photos of the large yards in South Boston or Cedar Hill, indicating to me, anyway, that the meat packing fleet in Southern New England was kept busy day in and day out.  Heck, there is a photo of not one but TWO Swift stock cars being switched with two Swift reefers in the Water Street Yard in New Haven, CT in the Cornell University Digital Collection.

 

Also from photos, like Swift and Armour, Wilson & Co had a vehicle fleet to transport locally processed product in metropolitan areas from local company-owned packing houses.

 

I learned only today, from the Encyclopedia of Chicago website, that Wilson also had established a sporting goods subsidiary by 1917…yes, THAT Wilson was one and the same!

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Garth Groff
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 5:16 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

 

Peter,

Some color views of both Wilson and Armour cars are found in John Henderson's CLASSIC FREIGHT CARS, VOL. 3. He offers four photos of steel Armour cars, and all have somewhat different tones, ranging from orange to yellow. Whether the original paint was different, or the variations are because of lighting, film type, or printing, I can't say. Similarly, the two views of Wilson steel cars are also quite different, and certainly lighting plays a role here, as the sky is rendered differently in the two photos.

One of the Wilson cars is lettered WCLX, but under lease to Schuyler Packing Co. and carries their herald. Question for discussion: Was Wilson a car supplier, a packer, or both?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 6/14/19 9:32 PM, Peter Ness wrote:

Hi Nelson,

 

RMJ (on TrainLife) has the Swift article in the Feb 1993 issue by Martin Lofton that includes color and b/w prototype photos. There is also a 3-part article by Richard Hendrickson on 36’ wood reefers in the Feb ’96, Oct. ’96 and Mar ’97 issues that includes b/w photos of some Swift reefers. You may find these helpful as well.

 

Now if I could only find such detail information on Wilson and Armour reefers I’d be a happy camper.

 

Peter Ness

 

 

 

Meat Reefer routing

John Barry
 

Obviously meat reefers were routed from the large packing houses to the distributors, but who were the distributors? I'm beginning to think that the large brands such as Swift, Cudahay, etc. shipped to their own distributor network who then sold to grocers, butchers and other wholesalers locally.  I base this partly on the 1943 Oakland City Directory listing for Meat Wholesalers which includes Cudahay at 222 3rd street, right on the WP line into Oakland.  It is in an industrial area with no room for a stock yard, just inland from the Santa Fe's Alice Street facilities.  Swift is several blocks west on the WP line at 312 Clay Street.  Morrell is between them on the next street toward the water at 364 2nd Street.  These distributorship facilities may give you a reason to include your favorite meat reefer on your layout, even if they didn't have a slaughterhouse and stockyards.



John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Saturday, June 15, 2019, 8:23:22 AM EDT, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:


Not to derail the paint discussion, but I just noticed that both of these reefers have, on the roof, the characteristic angle just outboard of the hatches that was standard on ART cars.  They also have the characteristic horizontal seam.

Were these cars built by ACF (or someone else) to an ART design?

Ron Merrick

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

mopacfirst
 

Not to derail the paint discussion, but I just noticed that both of these reefers have, on the roof, the characteristic angle just outboard of the hatches that was standard on ART cars.  They also have the characteristic horizontal seam.

Were these cars built by ACF (or someone else) to an ART design?

Ron Merrick

Re: Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

Peter Ness
 

Thank you, Garth.

 

I’ve come across very little reference information on Wilson & Co., so can’t provide any insight on possible car supplier operations.  From photographic evidence at least in the late 1950’s Wilson & Co reefers appear to be only slightly less present than Swift cars in Southern New England. Armour, Cudahy and others a distant third in appearance. There are numerous photos of blocks of Wilson & Co cars and also Swift cars on the New Haven’s Maybrook Line which would be the westward connection to Chicago. Likewise photos of single cars (Swift or Wilson & Co) in switching moves at local packing houses. Not so much for other meet packers. 

 

Unlike produce reefers, not many meet reefers appear in overview photos of the large yards in South Boston or Cedar Hill, indicating to me, anyway, that the meat packing fleet in Southern New England was kept busy day in and day out.  Heck, there is a photo of not one but TWO Swift stock cars being switched with two Swift reefers in the Water Street Yard in New Haven, CT in the Cornell University Digital Collection.

 

Also from photos, like Swift and Armour, Wilson & Co had a vehicle fleet to transport locally processed product in metropolitan areas from local company-owned packing houses.

 

I learned only today, from the Encyclopedia of Chicago website, that Wilson also had established a sporting goods subsidiary by 1917…yes, THAT Wilson was one and the same!

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Garth Groff
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 5:16 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wilson and Armor Reefers [was Swift 6700 Series]

 

Peter,

Some color views of both Wilson and Armour cars are found in John Henderson's CLASSIC FREIGHT CARS, VOL. 3. He offers four photos of steel Armour cars, and all have somewhat different tones, ranging from orange to yellow. Whether the original paint was different, or the variations are because of lighting, film type, or printing, I can't say. Similarly, the two views of Wilson steel cars are also quite different, and certainly lighting plays a role here, as the sky is rendered differently in the two photos.

One of the Wilson cars is lettered WCLX, but under lease to Schuyler Packing Co. and carries their herald. Question for discussion: Was Wilson a car supplier, a packer, or both?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 6/14/19 9:32 PM, Peter Ness wrote:

Hi Nelson,

 

RMJ (on TrainLife) has the Swift article in the Feb 1993 issue by Martin Lofton that includes color and b/w prototype photos. There is also a 3-part article by Richard Hendrickson on 36’ wood reefers in the Feb ’96, Oct. ’96 and Mar ’97 issues that includes b/w photos of some Swift reefers. You may find these helpful as well.

 

Now if I could only find such detail information on Wilson and Armour reefers I’d be a happy camper.

 

Peter Ness

 

 

 

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

Tim O'Connor
 


Sigh.



On 6/14/2019 8:31 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

Here are three variations on reefer orange and reefer yellow. The Wilson car is definitely orange. The Scalecoat II 1 to 5 mix approximates the Wilson color. The Kingan car is medium orange-yellow, and the Swift car is light orange-yellow (actually more orange than the photo shows, but not as orange as the Kingan car). Lights are 5000 K. The swift car isn’t a bright reefer yellow but yellow with a hint of orange. I think Rapido did a better job of color matching than Atlas.

 

Nelson Moyer

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Rapido Reefer Paint Color Comparison

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Nelson, I haven't found a good out of the bottle meat reefer yellow/orange.  As easily as those cars picked up dirt and grime it is a varying shade depending on the cars age, judging from actual photos in my humble opinion.
Fenton

On Fri, Jun 14, 2019 at 8:32 PM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Here are three variations on reefer orange and reefer yellow. The Wilson car is definitely orange. The Scalecoat II 1 to 5 mix approximates the Wilson color. The Kingan car is medium orange-yellow, and the Swift car is light orange-yellow (actually more orange than the photo shows, but not as orange as the Kingan car). Lights are 5000 K. The swift car isn’t a bright reefer yellow but yellow with a hint of orange. I think Rapido did a better job of color matching than Atlas.

 

Nelson Moyer



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

Re: Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

Peter Ness
 

Thank you, Nelson!

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 11:00 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

 

Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 21 has a comprehensive article on Armour reefers that you will find helpful. I don’t know of any Wilson references.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Peter Ness
Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 8:32 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

 

Hi Nelson,

 

RMJ (on TrainLife) has the Swift article in the Feb 1993 issue by Martin Lofton that includes color and b/w prototype photos. There is also a 3-part article by Richard Hendrickson on 36’ wood reefers in the Feb ’96, Oct. ’96 and Mar ’97 issues that includes b/w photos of some Swift reefers. You may find these helpful as well.

 

Now if I could only find such detail information on Wilson and Armour reefers I’d be a happy camper.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 5:07 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

 

I’ll look at the RMJ and MR articles. I’ve learned not to trust model photos, as even some cars in Sunshine instructions and PDSs are built and/ or painted wrong, e.g. cross bearers and/or cross ties positioned wrong and silver roof on reefers here builder’s photos were airbrushed. Model photos in old publication are particularly unreliable as little prototype information might be available when they were built. Color me skeptic.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 2:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Scheme for Swift 6700 Series Reefers

 

The Feb 1993 RMJ has color photos of models built from these kits, that might answer your questions. I have only a low-res scan and can't tell. In the Oct 1953 MR Paul Larsen has an article on building a Swift reefer in the red scheme from a different number series. He had the prototype car in front of him. He said the sill steps and underframe were black. Sides and ends red, except under the door, where black was uses. He said nothing about a different color for the end sill. Looking at other color photos of other red Swift cars (all from other number series), the sill steps under the doors are always black. At the ends of the sides, the sill steps appear to vary, with red used if the sides are steel, and sometimes red, sometimes black if the sides are wood (black especially if these is a black metal plate above the step - looks like a wrap-around from the end sill). The end sills also appear to be black when that plate is on the sides. Sometimes they appear to be black even without that plate, but usually red. In many cases, heavy weathering makes color determinations difficult, with everything in question just a dirty gray. Suggested solution: weather.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR