Date   
Re: New Walthers freight cars (Train Miniature )

Bob Chaparro
 

And for you trivia fans, what was the original name of Train Miniature?
Answer: Train Master. The first three months of advertisements for this company in Model Railroader used the name Train Master. But that name already belonged to Howell Day so the company switched to Train Miniature.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA 

Re: GM&O 40 ft Automobile CAr

Kemal Mumcu
 

I enjoy following your projects George. Keep us updated.

Colin Meikle

Re: GM&O 40 ft Automobile CAr

Paul Doggett
 

Beautiful work Geogre.

Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 17 Jul 2019, at 13:24, gtws00 via Groups.Io <gtws00@...> wrote:

A newer project in the works is a GM&O 40 ft Automobile car from the 35200-35249 series. The base kit for this build started with a Speedwitch kit consisting of a Branchline 7 ft door body and new resin parts and decals.
After obtaining a General Arrangement and Brake diagram from the St Louis National Museum of Transportation, I decided to scratch build a new floor matching the drawings. I also bent some new lower boor tracks from .005 brass. Attached are a couple photos of it progress. Long way to go yet on this project. Prototype photo credits go to Ed Hawkins
George Toman

Attachments:

Re: Slim pickings for RR magazine

George Eichelberger
 

Jim:

Sorry, I did not intend to exclude ANY of the historical groups in my comment. We are fortunate there are too many for anyone to be a member of them all. Many are sold in hobby shops that carry White River publications. Years ago, I suggested to Bob Hundman (Mainline Modeler) that he might consider running a “prototype” article from one of the groups in issues of MM but he was not short of material. (Maybe WRP could publish a compendium a couple of times a year?)

Although I am not personally familiar with the RF&P group I expect the folks organizing the 2020 SRHA convention in Richmond have already contacted the RF&P, C&O and ACL/SAL groups to join us. In addition to having probably 40,000 Southern and CofG rolling stock drawings (many are STMFC from about 1900), the SRHA archives at TVRM include more than 17,000 Southern Railway Presidents’ files. The early history of Washington Union Station, the Washington Southern, RF&P and the WB&P are well covered. If time permits, we will see some interesting presentations on Richmond…at Richmond.

Ike

PS To close the loop to a STMFC subject, note that steam and transition era subject are the central focus of many historical groups. In addition to TIES magazine, the Southern Railway Historical Assoc. group on Groups.io includes discussions on a variety of subjects……everyone is welcome to join, SRHA member or not.

GM&O 40 ft Automobile CAr

gtws00
 

A newer project in the works is a GM&O 40 ft Automobile car from the 35200-35249 series. The base kit for this build started with a Speedwitch kit consisting of a Branchline 7 ft door body and new resin parts and decals.
After obtaining a General Arrangement and Brake diagram from the St Louis National Museum of Transportation, I decided to scratch build a new floor matching the drawings. I also bent some new lower boor tracks from .005 brass. Attached are a couple photos of it progress. Long way to go yet on this project. Prototype photo credits go to Ed Hawkins
George Toman

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Wood Pipe Load

mopacfirst
 

In 2008, we dug up some redwood pipes from a refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, that had been installed when the site was first developed in 1918.

Ron Merrick

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Wood Pipe Load

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Doug is right. I worked on a water tank made of redwood that had slipped off its foundation during the Loma Prieta earthquake that was over a hundred years old, and had broken its pipes off. It was quite a chore finding someone to repair it. Redwood pipes were used all over the west, and of course, shipped by railroad.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 11:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Wood Pipe Load

I seem to recall water pipes made of redwood lasting up to a hundred years.

Blockedhttps://www.mendorailhistory.org/1_redwoods/redwood_pipes.htm <Blockedhttps://www.mendorailhistory.org/1_redwoods/redwood_pipes.htm>

Blockedhttps://www.notechmagazine.com/2010/09/wooden-stave-pipes.html <Blockedhttps://www.notechmagazine.com/2010/09/wooden-stave-pipes.html>



Doug Harding

Blockedwww.iowacentralrr.org



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Carlson via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 7:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Wood Pipe Load



While not the ones in the article we had some in the ground through the mid 1900’s in my hometown. They were being replaced when I was an engineering intern.

Brian J. Carlson P.E.


On Jul 16, 2019, at 8:18 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@... <mailto:bpehni@...> > wrote:

I can’t imagine they lasted long in service.

Thanks!

Brian Ehni

(Sent from my iPhone)


On Jul 16, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io <mailto:chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> > wrote:

Photo: Wood Pipe Load

A photo from The History of Sanitary Sewers website:

Blockedhttps://www.sewerhistory.org/images/pi/pil/1943_pil01.jpg <Blockedhttps://www.sewerhistory.org/images/pi/pil/1943_pil01.jpg>

Notice the tree sapling cribbing.

Caption from the site: "Substitute materials used in WWII: a shipment of 1,488 feet of 18-inch, 24-inch, 30-inch and 36-inch wooden pipe on one flat car. [Looks like a gondola car to me.] Weight 70,020 pounds. An equal footage of reinforced concrete pipe weighs 455,412 pounds and requires over ten cars. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed in 1942 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants. Photo date 1943."

The History of Sanitary Sewers website: Blockedhttps://www.sewerhistory.org/ <Blockedhttps://www.sewerhistory.org/>

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Slim pickings for RR magazine

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

To add to what Ike said, several historical societies also put out digital "e-zines" that are geared specifically to modelers. The PRRT&HS has one called "The Keystone Modeler" that presents (among many articles) prototype info in support of a specific class of freight car, then shows what was done to model it. The society also supports manufacturer efforts by providing data packages for them to use in better modeling the prototype.

Elden Gatwood
PRRT&HS

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 11:23 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Slim pickings for RR magazine

Although they are not strictly model railroading magazines, many Railroad historical groups produce high quality publications that are extremely useful to modelers. I am most familiar with the Southern, L&N, PRR, B&O and ACL/SAL groups’ work but others I do not see every issue; UP, NYC, N&W are superb sources of prototype information, several have excellent modeling sections.

With the growth of “prototype modeling” and RPM meets, the historical group publications may be the best source of prototype data today. It is true they do not serve “beginner” modelers but they are very useful for people that are interested in railroad history, the business of railroading and the technical and operational details of motive power and rolling stock.

Ike

Re: Model Railroad Magazines Back Issues

Eric Hansmann
 

Talbott is in eastern Tennessee between Knoxville and Johnson City. Not near Nashville.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On July 17, 2019 at 3:35 AM Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Bill Pardie asked:
"Does anyone know the name and contact of the company in Nashville that took over RaTailpub?"

Karen Stephans.  It's on Railpub's old website...


Ben Hom


 



Re: BLI Penn Salt tank car paint schemes

Jerome (Jerry) Albin
 

Besides Tacoma, Pennsalt had plants all over the country, including Natrona Pennsylvania, Calvert City, KY and Wyandotte, Michigan that shipped by tank cars. Products included: liquid caustic soda, chlorine, ferric chloride, sodium chlorate, hydrochloric acid, Isotron (Freon) and some other oddballs. Their tank cars could be seen all over the country. I worked for Pennsalt (Pennwalt) Corp. for 20 years....Regards...Jerry Albin
 
 
 
 

Re: Slim pickings for RR magazine

James Musgrove
 

Ike and all,

Please don't forget the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac RR Historical Society (www.RFandP.org) that helps to keep alive the history of the RF&P and the memories of the people who worked for them. The RF&P ran between Richmond, Virginia, and Washington D.C. and lasted from 1834 to the mid 1990's, when it joined CSX. This railroad is a great one to model since it was a little over 100 miles of double track and had yards at both ends, (Acca Yard in Richmond and Potomac Yard in Alexandria and Arlington, Virginia. 

Re: Model Railroad Magazines Back Issues

Benjamin Hom
 

Bill Pardie asked:
"Does anyone know the name and contact of the company in Nashville that took over Railpub?"

Karen Stephans.  It's on Railpub's old website...


Ben Hom

Re: Slim pickings for RR magazine

George Eichelberger
 

Although they are not strictly model railroading magazines, many Railroad historical groups produce high quality publications that are extremely useful to modelers. I am most familiar with the Southern, L&N, PRR, B&O and ACL/SAL groups’ work but others I do not see every issue; UP, NYC, N&W are superb sources of prototype information, several have excellent modeling sections.

With the growth of “prototype modeling” and RPM meets, the historical group publications may be the best source of prototype data today. It is true they do not serve “beginner” modelers but they are very useful for people that are interested in railroad history, the business of railroading and the technical and operational details of motive power and rolling stock.

Ike

Re: Photo: Wood Pipe Load

Douglas Harding
 

I seem to recall water pipes made of redwood lasting up to a hundred years.

https://www.mendorailhistory.org/1_redwoods/redwood_pipes.htm

https://www.notechmagazine.com/2010/09/wooden-stave-pipes.html

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Carlson via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 7:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Wood Pipe Load

 

While not the ones in the article we had some in the ground through the mid 1900’s in my hometown.  They were being replaced when I was an engineering intern. 

Brian J. Carlson P.E.


On Jul 16, 2019, at 8:18 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:

I can’t imagine they lasted long in service. 

Thanks!

Brian Ehni 

(Sent from my iPhone)


On Jul 16, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Wood Pipe Load

A photo from The History of Sanitary Sewers website:

https://www.sewerhistory.org/images/pi/pil/1943_pil01.jpg

Notice the tree sapling cribbing.

Caption from the site: "Substitute materials used in WWII: a shipment of 1,488 feet of 18-inch, 24-inch, 30-inch and 36-inch wooden pipe on one flat car. [Looks like a gondola car to me.] Weight 70,020 pounds. An equal footage of reinforced concrete pipe weighs 455,412 pounds and requires over ten cars. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed in 1942 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants. Photo date 1943."

The History of Sanitary Sewers website: https://www.sewerhistory.org/

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Slim pickings for RR magazine

Chuck Soule
 

There is a magazine store in North Vancouver called McNews that carries a good selection of American and British model and prototype RR magazines.  I always stop in when I am in BC (6 or 7 times a year).  Their British magazines are always 1-2 months behind due to shipping.  I am a member of a British Outline modeling club up there, and several members go to McNews to buy their magazines, so the market is still reasonably strong because the location has a significant British ex-pat community.

Once I come back into the states, there are very few model train stores left in Puget Sound, and it is difficult to find more than MR.  Barnes and Noble carries MR, RMC, and sometimes Railway Modeller and Model Rail.  Model Rail is much better for having practical how-to-do-it articles.

Chuck Soule

Re: Photo: Wood Pipe Load

Brian Carlson
 

I meant mid 1990’s.  

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 16, 2019, at 8:30 PM, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361@...> wrote:

While not the ones in the article we had some in the ground through the mid 1900’s in my hometown.  They were being replaced when I was an engineering intern. 

Brian J. Carlson P.E.

On Jul 16, 2019, at 8:18 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:

I can’t imagine they lasted long in service. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Jul 16, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Wood Pipe Load

A photo from The History of Sanitary Sewers website:

https://www.sewerhistory.org/images/pi/pil/1943_pil01.jpg

Notice the tree sapling cribbing.

Caption from the site: "Substitute materials used in WWII: a shipment of 1,488 feet of 18-inch, 24-inch, 30-inch and 36-inch wooden pipe on one flat car. [Looks like a gondola car to me.] Weight 70,020 pounds. An equal footage of reinforced concrete pipe weighs 455,412 pounds and requires over ten cars. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed in 1942 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants. Photo date 1943."

The History of Sanitary Sewers website: https://www.sewerhistory.org/

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Model Railroad Magazines Back Issues

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Does anyone know the name and contact of the company in Nashville that took over Railpub?

Bill Pardie.       


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

Re: BLI Penn Salt tank car paint schemes

Tim O'Connor
 

Since the Penn Salt operation was in Tacoma, perhaps the routings for caustic soda, chlorine
and or ammonia would not have taken the cars over the SP&S? But they did use the Milwaukee, as
seen in this photo.

Tim O'Connor

On 7/16/2019 9:42 PM, spsalso via Groups.Io wrote:
Thank you, Todd and Tim,

I now know far more than I did before.  It just struck me as odd that they would have so many paint schemes when Hooker stayed with their classic.

I've noticed that it is not uncommon to see a Hooker tank car at the front of an SP&S freight.  Haven't seen a shot with a Penn Salt, yet.

Edward Sutorik
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: BLI Penn Salt tank car paint schemes

spsalso
 

Thank you, Todd and Tim,

I now know far more than I did before.  It just struck me as odd that they would have so many paint schemes when Hooker stayed with their classic.

I've noticed that it is not uncommon to see a Hooker tank car at the front of an SP&S freight.  Haven't seen a shot with a Penn Salt, yet.


Ed

Edward Sutorik

Wood Pipe Load

Andy Carlson
 

Two towns that I am aware which had wood water lines are Eureka and Fort Bragg, both in California's Redwood country with large mills. I am confident that many more towns had these as well.

There was local news about 2 years ago when the town of Fort Bragg replaced their last Redwood log water pipes. They lasted long, some about a 100 years or longer. Unlike the low pressure WWll wooden pipes of this subject, the Redwood water mains were rifle drilled redwood logs and retained the bark. Illustrates the water-resistance Redwoods possess.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Tuesday, July 16, 2019, 5:30:31 PM PDT, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361@...> wrote:


While not the ones in the article we had some in the ground through the mid 1900’s in my hometown.  They were being replaced when I was an engineering intern. 



On Jul 16, 2019, at 8:18 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:

I can’t imagine they lasted long in service.