Date   
Re: Metal Wheels

Paul Doggett
 

I have always replaced them as I put stock into service they way it doesn’t hurt as much .

Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 3 Aug 2019, at 15:44, Barry Kenner <hoboborr@...> wrote:

Hello Group,
      I would like to replace most if not all of my plastic wheels , and change out for metal. For starters I have over 100 hoppers. That is 400 wheels. Would like to hear recommendations of what other members have done. Thanks,Barry 

Metal Wheels

Barry Kenner
 

Hello Group,
      I would like to replace most if not all of my plastic wheels , and change out for metal. For starters I have over 100 hoppers. That is 400 wheels. Would like to hear recommendations of what other members have done. Thanks,Barry 

Re: Another HD flat

StephenK
 

Athearn made a blue box kit of a similar car many moons ago.   They produced a couple of RTR runs  of it, but none for about ten years or so.   And, of course, I have no info as to how accurate a model it was.....

Steve Kay

Re: Drawing Help

earlyrail
 

Sorry, looks like I sold them all a few years ago.

Howard Garner

Re: Another HD flat

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Indeed, "outside of this group’s realm", and I mostly agree with you about Palomar. However, don’t sell it short … it was a fair site when first built … not at all currently. Still, for MANY years it was the world’s premier telescope, and contributed greatly to our understanding of the universe. Also, as I understand it, the Russian 236” telescope was troubled mostly by its alt-azimuth mount. The technology of the time was not up to that task. Nowadays most all big telescopes use such a mount, so the Russian giant was too far ahead of its time. And yes, it did have optical problems  from its huge one-piece mirror.

Someday I’d like to visit Mauna Kea and see the Keck telescopes. The largest I’ve ever worked with was a 52”, though I’ve observed through a 72”, and own a (somewhat) portable 18” equatorial.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Aug 2, 2019, at 7:45 PM, David Soderblom <drs@...> wrote:

This is outside of this group’s realm, 

Re: Photo: Heavy Duty Milwaukee Road Flat Car 601051

espee4441
 
Edited

Loaded onto the barge in Seattle would have been interesting to say the least, I think that your GN option makes the most sense. I live right above the main here in White Rock and bringing in a special load like that then the easiest option would be GN. It could go MILW then on the boat from Seattle to B'ham and handed over to the GN with a much easier way to get into Vancouver. Going up Milw row to Sumas I still have a hard time seeing happen.   My earlier hope was it made its way north to Winnipeg and then west, fat chance.

Tony Pawley
White Rock, BC

Re: Gondolas converted into TOFC cars

rwitt_2000
 

Another RI  one.


The B&O did COFC using the O-27 gondola. I have a diagram, but no photo.

Bob Witt

Re: Drawing Help

csxt5555
 

Issues 51&52 from 1975


On Aug 2, 2019, at 8:26 PM, earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:

What issue of X2200 South?
I have many.
Howard Garner

Re: Drawing Help

earlyrail
 

What issue of X2200 South?
I have many.
Howard Garner

Re: Another HD flat

David Soderblom
 

This is outside of this group’s realm, I admit, but, as an astronomer, the 200-inch (5-meter) was an amazing instrument that never really realized its potential.  It’s mostly the site, Mount Palomar, which does not have all that great of observing conditions.  This was proved, without doubt, by the Soviet 6-meter project in the Caucasus: it had pitiful performance with its conventional technology.

It wasn’t until the Keck telescope on Mauna Kea in the 1990s that there was a major advance, and in two realms:
  • Mauna Kea is the single best place on the earth to put a telescope.  No exceptions.  There are others that are close, but Mauna Kea tops them all.  Bear that in mind when you read current news.  It has to do with minimal water vapor overhead (critical for infrared observations) and so-called “seeing,” or image quality, which, at Mauna Kea is the very best.
  • The Keck telescopes used segmented mirrors, controlled by sensors and computers to make them into a single, phased surface.  That was revolutionary.

How do I know?  I was there fir the first science observations with Keck in November, 1993.  I’ve used it since and have used many more conventional telescopes.  Keck is/was exceptional, and redefined the state of the art.

And yet, the movement of the 200-inch mirror was clearly a major PR success.  It was the Hubble Telescope of its time.


David Soderblom, Astronomer
Space Telescope Science Institute
Baltimore MD USA





Re: Gondolas converted into TOFC cars

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

The picture I posted had 1959 Cadillacs. And the RI Color Guide by Steve Hile says the conversions started in 1958.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "RICH CHAPIN via Groups.Io" <rwc27q@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Friday, August 2, 2019 at 5:51 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Gondolas converted into TOFC cars

 

Railmodel Journal Sept 1989 says RI converted 222 if those outside braced gons into piggy flats. Doesn't say when, but the pic with that article says "circa 1962"

Rich Chapin

Re: Gondolas converted into TOFC cars

RICH CHAPIN
 

Railmodel Journal Sept 1989 says RI converted 222 if those outside braced gons into piggy flats. Doesn't say when, but the pic with that article says "circa 1962"

Rich Chapin

Re: Gondolas converted into TOFC cars

RICH CHAPIN
 

That's a Great Photo!! THX!!!

Rich Chapin

Re: Original old ORER's for sale!

proto48er
 

Sold, pending payment!   Thank you!!!!

A.T. Kott

Re: Drawing Help

csxt5555
 

Thanks Nelson.  Yup I will.  I’m doing these as a 1.6 scale kit so I’m researching and picking the most popular phase to do first.  I really need a copy of the 2200 extra south that has all the phases.

Kevin 

Kevin


On Aug 2, 2019, at 6:21 PM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Be sure to check the phase for your model. For example, the phase 1 builds bought by the CB&Q did not have the radiator grills. What I’m saying is that this drawing may not be correct for the prototype you wish to model.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Bergh
Sent: Friday, August 02, 2019 3:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Drawing Help

 

Here ya go... Hope this helps, -Eric

Re: Drawing Help

Nelson Moyer
 

Be sure to check the phase for your model. For example, the phase 1 builds bought by the CB&Q did not have the radiator grills. What I’m saying is that this drawing may not be correct for the prototype you wish to model.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Bergh
Sent: Friday, August 02, 2019 3:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Drawing Help

 

Here ya go... Hope this helps, -Eric

Re: Drawing Help

csxt5555
 

Thanks soo much


On Aug 2, 2019, at 4:45 PM, Eric Bergh <ericbergh2@...> wrote:

Here ya go... Hope this helps, -Eric
<GE-44T.jpg>

Original old ORER's for sale!

proto48er
 

I have the following original Official Railway Equipment Registers for sale:

February 1897 in very good condition for its age (122 years old).  $250.00

November 1902 in very good condition, except that a triangular piece of the cover has been torn off  $225.00

August 1904 in excellent condition  $225.00

All three of these ORERs are complete and all pages are in excellent, almost "like new," condition!  They were part of the AT&SF set in the Chicago office.  There is a lot of interesting information in these books.  Many of the railroad entries have only L-W-H information and car numbers, but some have complete measurements for each number series of car like the later ORERs.

PM me if interested.  Thanks!  A.T. Kott

Re: Another HD flat

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

From Palomar Observatory document …

"On March 26, 1936, the mirror blank began its 16-day trip by rail from Corning to the Caltech optical shop in Pasadena. The telescope project captured the public’s imagination, and all across the country thousands of people lined the train tracks to watch it pass.

It was shipped on NYC well-flat No. 499010. Many photos of this movement can be found online.

The glass blank did arrive in Pasadena and went to Caltech optical shop. It stayed there for a couple years while the mirror was ground and polished. The completed mirror was then trucked up the mountain to its present location at the observatory. The whole story can be found by searching at Caltech-Palomar and the Corning Glass Works.

The mechanical parts of the telescope mount were shipped through he Panama Canal to the west coast. They were much bigger and heavier than the mirror.

This 200” telescope remained the largest in the world for many years. Though now surpassed, it’s still a respectable instrument today.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Aug 2, 2019, at 3:59 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

Sorry!  It’s probably true that many of the USERS of such large machines were also in the industrial east, but not ALL. Some HAD to go “out in interchange” … or be transferred from one car to another (unlikely). There were only a few places in the country where such things could be made, and they had to be shipped to wherever they were needed.

The huge items needed for the Manhattan Project (“Jumbo"), and the Palomar 200” telescope mirror being good examples of huge items being moved most of the way across the country. Not to mention the big battleship guns … these things moved back and forth across the country before, and during WWII; and for some time after. These things had short service lives and had to be relined. Most all the big 16”-gunned battleships were in the Pacific, and the only yard that could reline their guns was on the east coast. Such movements from Washington State and California to the east and back were common.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Aug 2, 2019, at 12:43 PM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

I have seen others like this, that were for creating things like large mill rolls, flywheels, and such.  They didn't use regular molds for these ingots, but made up special breakable molds, once poured a cooled, were broken to release the ingot.

These did not go out in interchange; I never saw one on somebody else's rails.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Soderblom
Sent: Friday, August 2, 2019 12:21 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Another HD flat

It says it’s an ingot, but it looks rough, like concrete.  And why the asymmetric shape?




David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA
drs@...











Re: Drawing Help

Eric Bergh
 

Here ya go... Hope this helps, -Eric