Date   

Re: Rib Side Cars

Curt Fortenberry
 


Agree with David, per RP cyc Vol 13, the best source out there in print for rib side cars, that's the series for Automobile Cars with large end doors.  Sadly no photo of that series in the article.

Curt Fortenberry


Re: An update from Yarmouth Model Works

Pierre Oliver
 

Well that's the first image to pop up with a Superior door.
Figures

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com

On 8/09/19 6:57 p.m., David via Groups.Io wrote:
I trust the 49000-series B-5 will come with the Superior door option?

https://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=19398

David Thompson



An update from Yarmouth Model Works

David
 

I trust the 49000-series B-5 will come with the Superior door option?

https://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=19398

David Thompson


Rib Side Cars

David
 

I???ve just put together kit # 5351, a 50??? car with shorts ribs, 15??? doors, and large ends doors.

Looks like 15500-15749 is your series.

David Thompson


Re: Rib Side Cars

anthony wagner
 

Brian, I can not supply a photo but according to my 1-1-50 ORER the only all steel 50'6" IL MILW box cars  with 15' side doors and full end doors were in number series 15500-15749. There were 249 cars in that series still in service at that time. If your decal sheet says BLT 47 those cars would have existed on 1-1-50.  MILW had other series of 50' steel cars with full end doors but they all had 12' side doors which is not what you have. The ORER only gives dimensions of the cars listed and no information about appearance. Hope this helps, Tony Wagner

On Friday, August 9, 2019, 4:27:10 PM CDT, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:


I’ve just put together kit # 5351, a 50’ car with shorts ribs, 15’ doors, and large ends doors. I cannot find a photo of this car either on my computer or online. What’s an appropriate number, given the blt date on the supplied decals is 2-47 and reweigh is 5-51?

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 


Rib Side Cars

 

I’ve just put together kit # 5351, a 50’ car with shorts ribs, 15’ doors, and large ends doors. I cannot find a photo of this car either on my computer or online. What’s an appropriate number, given the blt date on the supplied decals is 2-47 and reweigh is 5-51?

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 


Re: Railway express agency (was LCL)

Alex Huff
 

The REA commission revenue a local railroad freight agent received was a consideration when bidding to hold a particular station.  A PRR agent, who never had the seniority to hold the job, told me about a highly desirable one, Harbor Springs, MI.  On the end of a short branch, which connected at Petoskey, MI, there was quite a bit of traffic of people able to spend summers in the cooler climate near the top of Michigan's Lower Peninsula next to Lake Michigan.  This was in the days before air conditioning.  Seasonal stores catering to higher end clientele expressed unsold inventory to a sister store in Florida for the winter season.  Several baggage cars were placed at the depot to handle the business.
           


Re: Railway express agency (was LCL)

s shaffer
 

Bob Webber writes:

Get Ten Turtles to Tucamcari.
Tucamcari New Mexico USA is in Northeastern New Mexico. On the old RI/SP line from El Paso Texas and on US Route 66. Not to be confused with Tumacacori in Southern Arizona.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico


Re: An update from Yarmouth Model Works

Matt Goodman
 

They look to be just newer than my 1938 modeling time frame. Bummer, but still neat to see steam era N&W cars being done. 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Aug 9, 2019, at 10:14 AM, James Brewer <jim.brewer.3611@...> wrote:

Like Bill, I am excited and glad and N&W B-5 boxcar is being done....but I think it is beautiful, not homely! LOL!  The other kits look great as well.  Thanks for doing all of these cars.

Jim Brewer

On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 8:26 AM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:
Very excited about the N&W B5, arguably the most homely boxcar ever built. thank you for doing them Pierre.

Bill Welch


Re: Railway express agency (was LCL)

Steve SANDIFER
 

Before trucks took over LCL, it was common for the combine on a branch line to have the mail, LCL, and Express in the same car. It was also common to have an old reefer or box in front of the combine to carry the LCL. On occasion there would be a LCL stock car to pick up or deliver livestock LCL on a branch. Later most live stock was crated and carried in the express car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Evans via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2019 9:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Railway express agency (was LCL)

 

Hi Steve,

From my experience Railway Express had their own offices & storage buildings in even smaller towns (but not really tiny places), always shipped on passenger trains, usually in railroad-owned "express cars" with their name often stenciled on the side, and had their own trucks for local delivery.  It was definitely a premium service & was a big operation at one time.  There were other express companies including Wells Fargo that operated in a similar way, but only one would typically have the contract with any given railroad.  I think I remember hearing that the New York Central had their own express company?  Others here can probably add more & correct my mistakes.

Tom

PS - I remember when I was a kid the local passenger train stopping in Rocky Ford, Colorado, for up to a half hour during cantaloupe season while they loaded 3 express cars full of crates of cantaloupes headed for Denver & who-knows-where-else.


Re: Railway express agency (was LCL)

steve_wintner
 

Thanks Gents, that's exactly what I was wondering. 

Nelson, as a fellow music fan, I sympathize!


Re: An update from Yarmouth Model Works

Pierre Oliver
 

Those are the Buckeye Cushion trucks that will be in the kit
They are cast by F&C

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 8/09/19 10:37 a.m., Roger Huber via Groups.Io wrote:

I wouldn't car it homely but it is different! Who does the trucks like on the first series photo?

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Friday, August 9, 2019, 07:26:01 AM CDT, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:


Very excited about the N&W B5, arguably the most homely boxcar ever built. thank you for doing them Pierre.

Bill Welch


Re: An update from Yarmouth Model Works

Roger Huber <trainpainter@...>
 

I wouldn't car it homely but it is different! Who does the trucks like on the first series photo?

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Friday, August 9, 2019, 07:26:01 AM CDT, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:


Very excited about the N&W B5, arguably the most homely boxcar ever built. thank you for doing them Pierre.

Bill Welch


Re: An update from Yarmouth Model Works

James Brewer
 

Like Bill, I am excited and glad and N&W B-5 boxcar is being done....but I think it is beautiful, not homely! LOL!  The other kits look great as well.  Thanks for doing all of these cars.

Jim Brewer

On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 8:26 AM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:
Very excited about the N&W B5, arguably the most homely boxcar ever built. thank you for doing them Pierre.

Bill Welch


Re: Railway express agency (was LCL)

Nelson Moyer
 

My one and only experience with REA was in 1974, well toward their demise. I was discharged from the Air Force at Little Rock Air Force Base and moving back to Florida. The Mayflower driver loading my belongings refused to accept responsibility for my Altec Lansing stereo speakers, which were rather large. After arguing with him and losing the argument, I called REA to ship them to Jacksonville. I would have done better using a trucking company. A month after I arrived in Jacksonville, the speakers were delivered to my apartment. I uncreated them to fine that they hadn’t been packed properly, and the top had been ripped off one speaker, and both walnut veneer cabinets were badly damaged. I filed a claim, and an adjuster came out to expect the damage. He was less than sympathetic, and at first insisted that REA wasn’t responsible for the damage. He told me to have them repaired. I told him that it was impossible to restore speaker performance on speakers that were that badly damaged, and I expected full replacement costs as they were less than two years old. After much bitter argument, I ended up with 75% if replacement cost. The speakers went into a dumpster. Frankly, I was glad to see REA go bankrupt.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charles Peck
Sent: Friday, August 09, 2019 6:33 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Railway express agency (was LCL)

 

The REA shipments that I remember were flowers and live day old chicks. 

For Valentines Day lots of small town florists would be getting boxes of roses. At the REA building back behind Louisville KY Union Station there would be fragrant carts of boxes to be distributed to this local and that.

Springtime also brought boxes of live chicks, 100 to the ventilated box.  They had to be kept warm and delivered within 48 hours as I recall.  I saw baggage carts stacked high with chicks.  PEEP  PEEP PEEP!

I recall being told that these shipment were often COD, cash on delivery.  If not picked up in 24 hours, the agent was authorized to sell the chicks for the REA charge.  Better than disposing of dead chicks. 

Chuck Peck 

 


Re: Railway express agency (was LCL)

Bob Webber
 

Get Ten Turtles to Tucamcari - a book that will explain REA concepts, work and methods the best. (Also the REA equipment book by Rossman)

At one time, REA was the Parcel Post, FedEx, UPS, and messenger service rolled into one. In many cases, more important than the USPO. You wanted chicks to Babylon? They hauled live chicks throughout the country. This is one reason I strive to to make people understand - a baggage car and a mail baggage car are usually not that simple. That's one reason the designation for most was either BE or MBE. Folks who should know a lot better, term any car with mail apartments an RPO - completely dismissing the Express component.

A package would be sent via a passenger train - usually the first leg would be a primary or secondary train - then the package would be moved to another car/train for continuation -. At the station, it would be given to the agent, Then a delivery man would take the package via wagon, truck, feet to it's destination. Anything and everything from live stock to sewing needles were sent this way.

Note that the REA messenger would not necessarily be the messenger within the BE - there might be two or the two components (baggage and company mail vs express) would be separated within the car. *MOST* baggage cars were not used for baggage, they were used for express. In the era of this list, there were huge mail order businesses, remnants of which sort of exist today - Sears, Montgomery Ward, J. C. Penny and others - used REA as much as Amazon used to use Fed-Ex & UPS. And it went everywhere. The green trucks were ubiquitous. Today, Amazon has fulfillment centers around the country, but originally they were centered in Memphis & Louisville (among others) so that they were near the hubs of Fed-Exx & UPS. The concept is no different today, although trucks have a far larger component than do the planes (rail in this era).

Express in the original mode started dying when Congress allowed the Post office to take parcels. Once that happened - given the point to point route mail has (from a shipper perspective) and cheaper rates, it was natural to use USPO. REA then started COFC & TOFC as well as dedicated reefers and special cars (horse, for example) to attempt to gain back share - but it was a slide from the mid 50s on. If you are modeling in the steam era, REA should be a major component - wether in trains (both freight & passenger) or simply in the scenery. Look at ANY station or depot plat and you will see an REA building or room. Look at urban scenes, you'll likely find the van. REA also initiated the hated ads on the sides of trucks.

Often, baggage cars that had gone west in passenger trains, returned in all local trains or even freight trains. Same with mail cars. Those who should know better continue to simply call them "baggage" or RPO" cars when the truth is, in the era they are modeling, Express was a HUGE component. Note most such cars included the name on the side of the "baggage" compartment. Fans & modelers get into sloppy habits of calling things incorrectly and are willfully ignorant - Express cars, Mail Cars, Single Sheathed, running boards, etc. are all known well enough to term things correctly.



At 08:59 PM 8/8/2019, steve_wintner via Groups.Io wrote:
Since LCL is being discussed in another thread, I thought I'd ask a related question - can anyone summarize REA ops, or suggest some books or resources?

I have heard it described as "UPS by rail", but struggle to understand that. Between large cities, sure, or along the lines between them. Chicago to Mundelein or Deerfield IL, for example. And often as head end traffic on passenger trains.

But how did REA go about shipping, a few parcels to small towns on branch lines? They wouldn't have an REA car full, clearly. I imagine the REA parcels got loaded in with other LCL on the railroads own cars (or trucks), as being discussed in that thread? Would it have been handled by the local passenger train, or freight, or was it simply whatever came by next?

Or would it have likely been delivered by REA trucks?

Thanks
- Puzzled in Seattle
Bob Webber


Re: An update from Yarmouth Model Works

Bill Welch
 

Very excited about the N&W B5, arguably the most homely boxcar ever built. thank you for doing them Pierre.

Bill Welch


An update from Yarmouth Model Works

Pierre Oliver
 

Please have a look at this blog post for news from Yarmouth Model Works
https://elgincarshops.blogspot.com/2019/08/new-kits-for-fall-of-2019.html

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


Re: Railway express agency (was LCL)

Charles Peck
 

The REA shipments that I remember were flowers and live day old chicks. 
For Valentines Day lots of small town florists would be getting boxes of roses. At the REA building back behind Louisville KY Union Station there would be fragrant carts of boxes to be distributed to this local and that.
Springtime also brought boxes of live chicks, 100 to the ventilated box.  They had to be kept warm and delivered within 48 hours as I recall.  I saw baggage carts stacked high with chicks.  PEEP  PEEP PEEP!
I recall being told that these shipment were often COD, cash on delivery.  If not picked up in 24 hours, the agent was authorized to sell the chicks for the REA charge.  Better than disposing of dead chicks. 
Chuck Peck 

On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 12:19 AM Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:
On Thu, Aug 8, 2019 at 08:34 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

REA shipments were express shipments, handled in baggage cars. LCL was handled in freight cars.

 

Doug has it right; LCL and Express don't mix. LCL was a freight tariff, the cheapest way to ship heavy, bulky items that didn't fill a car. It was more expensive than carload rate, but carload rate didn't do the store that needed to ship ONE stove to a customer much good. It wasn't particularly fast, but in the days before trucks, was as fast as any other method.

Express was premium service. In the days before FedEx and air freight, if it absolutely positively had to get there quickly, it went express. Express moved at passenger train speed, because it moved on passenger trains. While REA owned their own cars for large shipments, they also leased space in the baggage cars of at least one train on every possible route. Very common in the Midwest were mail & express cars, a 15 or 30 foot postal apartment, with the rest of the car dedicated to express and whatever baggage there was. The RPO clerks handled the mail, and the baggage man handled the express, with his salary partially paid by REA. Where LCL and express finally came together was in the freight room of the small local depots, where both waited to be claimed.

Dennis Storzek


Photography as a tool

Eric Hansmann
 

I find a camera can be a helpful tool when building models and to capture roster shots when the models are completed. A few photo tips are shared in my latest blog post.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2019/08/09/photography/



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

21761 - 21780 of 187873