Date   
Re: Removing mold from a railroad print

Jon Miller
 

On 8/26/2019 2:55 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

    If it costs too much you might try a Q tip and water or soap and water.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Removing mold from a railroad print

Michael Gross
 

The American Institute for Conservation https://www.culturalheritage.org may be able to help you find a paper conservator in your area.  Naturally, there is some cost involved, and you will have to weigh the cost of conservation with the value of the print itself.  I.e., is it "worth saving?"

Many conservators have sub specialties:  works on canvas, works on paper, etc.

Good luck!

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

MARPM room share

Eric Hansmann
 

I’ve made reservations to attend the upcoming Mid-Atlantic RPM (MARPM). Anyone care to split a room? Please use the REPLY to SENDER link at the bottom of the message to contact me off list. Or copy and paste this into your email browser and replace the words and spaces accordingly for an off list reply.

 

eric at hansmanns dot org

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

Re: Susquehanna 40’ boxcars c1940-48

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello John and FC Group!

The ERIE's 93000 series of nominal 36' inside length XM boxcars are of no relationship to the older 'Fowler' ERIE cars.  The former were built in 1920-21 by Standard Steel Car.  The Fowlers 1913-14 by both SSC and AC&F.  None of the 93000 were a part of the NYS&W fleet.

Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.

On Monday, August 26, 2019, 9:02:05 PM EDT, John Sykes III via Groups.Io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:


In January 1948 NYS&W had 49 - 36' IL boxcars.  The number series they were in was 1500 to 1563, so they probably had 64 or more cars originally.  My understanding was that Erie bought over 1,000 of these Canadian style boxcars and lettered some as NYS&W, which they had controlling interest in at the time.  Also in the January 1948 ORER there are none, 0, zip, nadda, 40 ft boxcars on the Suzy Q roster.  Interestingly 951 of the Erie cars (93000-93999) are listed as IL = 35'10" ???  Were these different cars or 36' IL cars modified in some way?  The true 36' IL cars are in two separate number groups in 1948 (60000-60005 and 86010-88016).  The Accurail car is numbered 87134 - i.e., out of the second group.  Their NYS&W 36' car is numbered 1567.  I guess that January 1948 ORER I bought came in handy after all.

-- John

Re: 3/4 improved dreadnaught endo for a 10'-0" IH boxcar

pennsylvania1954
 

Fenton--Also the Branchline Rib/3/4 end can be modified. Sand or file the rib off flush then trim to the correct height. For me, the BL end looks better with its rounded contours. The ribs of the IM end resemble gear teeth.
--
Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

Re: Removing mold from a railroad print

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I agree with Bob.  That’s a job for professionals, or at least, professional advice.

 

I presume, Fenton, that the photo depicts a steam era freight car, at least?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Miller
Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 5:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print

 

Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...>
Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 4:37:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print

 

This is kinda off topic but I have a railroad print that I forgot I had and after 6 or 7 moves I found it in a tube and it has some light brown mold on it.  Does anoyoone know how to remove the mold without hurting the print.
I hope the jail cell is warm and the food is good
Fenton Wells

Re: Susquehanna 40’ boxcars c1940-48

John Sykes III
 

Groups IO won't let me upload this file to the files section so lets try it this way.

-- John

Re: Susquehanna 40’ boxcars c1940-48

John Sykes III
 

As a follow-up, I model c-1955 so I have a detailed NYS&W freight roster for that time period (1954-1958) with notes.  The notes indicate that Suzy Q originally had 500 Fowler box cars listed as manufactured by Fowler Car Co. of Canada (could be a mistake).  I have notes on the other boxcars that I thought you might find interesting, so I have uploaded the roster to the files here.

-- John

Re: Susquehanna 40’ boxcars c1940-48

John Sykes III
 

In January 1948 NYS&W had 49 - 36' IL boxcars.  The number series they were in was 1500 to 1563, so they probably had 64 or more cars originally.  My understanding was that Erie bought over 1,000 of these Canadian style boxcars and lettered some as NYS&W, which they had controlling interest in at the time.  Also in the January 1948 ORER there are none, 0, zip, nadda, 40 ft boxcars on the Suzy Q roster.  Interestingly 951 of the Erie cars (93000-93999) are listed as IL = 35'10" ???  Were these different cars or 36' IL cars modified in some way?  The true 36' IL cars are in two separate number groups in 1948 (60000-60005 and 86010-88016).  The Accurail car is numbered 87134 - i.e., out of the second group.  Their NYS&W 36' car is numbered 1567.  I guess that January 1948 ORER I bought came in handy after all.

-- John

Re: 3/4 improved dreadnaught endo for a 10'-0" IH boxcar

Tony Thompson
 

Isn’t that the end on the IM 12-panel box car?
Tony Thompson 


On Aug 26, 2019, at 4:58 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:

Does anyone make such a product?
Fenton Wells

3/4 improved dreadnaught endo for a 10'-0" IH boxcar

O Fenton Wells
 

Does anyone make such a product?
Fenton Wells

Re: Removing mold from a railroad print

Bob Miller
 

Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...>
Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 4:37:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print
 
This is kinda off topic but I have a railroad print that I forgot I had and after 6 or 7 moves I found it in a tube and it has some light brown mold on it.  Does anoyoone know how to remove the mold without hurting the print.
I hope the jail cell is warm and the food is good
Fenton Wells

Removing mold from a railroad print

O Fenton Wells
 

This is kinda off topic but I have a railroad print that I forgot I had and after 6 or 7 moves I found it in a tube and it has some light brown mold on it.  Does anoyoone know how to remove the mold without hurting the print.
I hope the jail cell is warm and the food is good
Fenton Wells

Re: Susquehanna 40’ boxcars c1940-48

Kemal Mumcu
 

Just curious, how many cars were listed in '45?

Colin Meikle

Re: Susquehanna 40’ boxcars c1940-48

ed_mines
 

I've seen a couple of photos of former LV double door box cars rebuilt with a single door with the old lady billboard Susquehanna advertising.

Re: PM box car - unusual ends?

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tim and Armand,

A very useful categorization, at least if all of us used it. It needs to be expanded, and available somewhere in our archives.

Van Dorn ends?

How about adding the Canadian NSCE ends?

Are the NTE ends the ones applied to experimental light-weight boxcars built in the late 1930s? There were two versions of these ends, one by Pullman with fat wales that ended short of the car end edges, and another very rare end by AC&F which had thinner wales that went all the way to the car end edges. See MODEL RAILROADING June 1987.

What is meant by the "alternate" on the R+3/4 IDE and R+3/4 TDE ends? Could this be better defined?

Could we have an addendum classing the various auto car end door designs?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff




On 8/26/2019 9:47 AM, Armand Premo wrote:
Unusual ends?How about the C&O 5400s with the "Deco ends.Armand Premo

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On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 8:57 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

lol - and a third candidate term! I started with Ed Hawkins' nomenclature
where he assigned a specific code to each type of end. In my opinion that's
really the only solution - a kind of scientific notation for freight car ends.
I expanded on Ed's and I keep them on file as my own reference

 5/5/5 MUR     Murphy end
   7/7 MUR     Murphy end
 3/3/3 DN      dreadnaught (some early auto cars)
   4   DN      dreadnaught (gondolas)
   4/4 DN      dreadnaught
   4/5 DN      dreadnaught
   5/5 DN      dreadnaught
   4/4 DART    "dartnot" or ACF Car Builder end (1950-1954)
   4/4 IDE     "rolling pin"
   4/4 IDE-2   "rolling pin" w/ short top rib
   3/4 IDE     "rolling pin" w/ extra narrow top rib
   3/4 IDE-2   "rolling pin" w/ no extra narrow top rib
 R-3/4 IDE     "rolling pin" w/ rectangular top rib (postwar to 1954)
 R+3/4 IDE      - alternate
 R-3/4 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ rectangular top rib (1955 and onwards)
 R+3/4 TDE      - alternate
   4/4 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ no rectangular rib
 3/3/3 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ no rectangular rib
   x/x PSE     Pullman Standard end
     x NTE     Non Terminating End

          -r   modifier indicates rivet seams
          -w   modifier indicates welded seams

   ... IV..    "inverse" pattern (mirror image)
   ... RV..    "reverse" pattern (inside out)





On 8/25/2019 3:02 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:

You're looking at the backside view of most dreadnaught ends (with variations
in the number of ribs and panels). Some call them "reverse dreadnaughts" and I've
heard "inverse dreadnaught" as well.
     I don't see this as a reverse end at all. I think people are being confused by the two wider ribs, probably located at seams where pieces of the end are joined together. It might be a RECESSED end, in which the corrugations look pressed INTO the end, rather than proud of its surface, but I'm not sure if that's the case.

Tony Thompson
tony@...

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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Re: Susquehanna 40’ boxcars c1940-48

G.J. Irwin
 

The 36 foot boxcars Don Valentine mentioned are shown in the January 1945 ORER as well.

Although after the 1948 time period end about which you asked, the next ORER in my accumulation is from July 1950 and shows 40 of the 36 foot boxcars on the roster. 

Elsewhere online it's noted that the road had some 40 foot boxcars, which were later sold to the Monon.  The ex-LV boxcars in the familiar green "Ship With Susie-Q" lettering would appear "in the future" for this list.

Cheers,
George Irwin

Re: PM box car - unusual ends?

Armand Premo
 

Unusual ends?How about the C&O 5400s with the "Deco ends.Armand Premo

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On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 8:57 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

lol - and a third candidate term! I started with Ed Hawkins' nomenclature
where he assigned a specific code to each type of end. In my opinion that's
really the only solution - a kind of scientific notation for freight car ends.
I expanded on Ed's and I keep them on file as my own reference

 5/5/5 MUR     Murphy end
   7/7 MUR     Murphy end
 3/3/3 DN      dreadnaught (some early auto cars)
   4   DN      dreadnaught (gondolas)
   4/4 DN      dreadnaught
   4/5 DN      dreadnaught
   5/5 DN      dreadnaught
   4/4 DART    "dartnot" or ACF Car Builder end (1950-1954)
   4/4 IDE     "rolling pin"
   4/4 IDE-2   "rolling pin" w/ short top rib
   3/4 IDE     "rolling pin" w/ extra narrow top rib
   3/4 IDE-2   "rolling pin" w/ no extra narrow top rib
 R-3/4 IDE     "rolling pin" w/ rectangular top rib (postwar to 1954)
 R+3/4 IDE      - alternate
 R-3/4 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ rectangular top rib (1955 and onwards)
 R+3/4 TDE      - alternate
   4/4 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ no rectangular rib
 3/3/3 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ no rectangular rib
   x/x PSE     Pullman Standard end
     x NTE     Non Terminating End

          -r   modifier indicates rivet seams
          -w   modifier indicates welded seams

   ... IV..    "inverse" pattern (mirror image)
   ... RV..    "reverse" pattern (inside out)





On 8/25/2019 3:02 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:

You're looking at the backside view of most dreadnaught ends (with variations
in the number of ribs and panels). Some call them "reverse dreadnaughts" and I've
heard "inverse dreadnaught" as well.
     I don't see this as a reverse end at all. I think people are being confused by the two wider ribs, probably located at seams where pieces of the end are joined together. It might be a RECESSED end, in which the corrugations look pressed INTO the end, rather than proud of its surface, but I'm not sure if that's the case.

Tony Thompson
tony@...

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: ACL automobile boxcar

Benjamin Hom
 

Eric Hansmann wrote:
"Bob Chapman wrapped up an ACL automobile boxcar recently. He shares photos and techniques in the latest Resin Car Works blog post."

I always sit up and take notice whenever I see one of Bob's articles or blog posts.  His techniques and problem solving is very creative - I always learn something from his projects.


Ben Hom

Re: PM box car - unusual ends?

Tim O'Connor
 


lol - and a third candidate term! I started with Ed Hawkins' nomenclature
where he assigned a specific code to each type of end. In my opinion that's
really the only solution - a kind of scientific notation for freight car ends.
I expanded on Ed's and I keep them on file as my own reference

 5/5/5 MUR     Murphy end
   7/7 MUR     Murphy end
 3/3/3 DN      dreadnaught (some early auto cars)
   4   DN      dreadnaught (gondolas)
   4/4 DN      dreadnaught
   4/5 DN      dreadnaught
   5/5 DN      dreadnaught
   4/4 DART    "dartnot" or ACF Car Builder end (1950-1954)
   4/4 IDE     "rolling pin"
   4/4 IDE-2   "rolling pin" w/ short top rib
   3/4 IDE     "rolling pin" w/ extra narrow top rib
   3/4 IDE-2   "rolling pin" w/ no extra narrow top rib
 R-3/4 IDE     "rolling pin" w/ rectangular top rib (postwar to 1954)
 R+3/4 IDE      - alternate
 R-3/4 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ rectangular top rib (1955 and onwards)
 R+3/4 TDE      - alternate
   4/4 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ no rectangular rib
 3/3/3 TDE     "tapered rib" w/ no rectangular rib
   x/x PSE     Pullman Standard end
     x NTE     Non Terminating End

          -r   modifier indicates rivet seams
          -w   modifier indicates welded seams

   ... IV..    "inverse" pattern (mirror image)
   ... RV..    "reverse" pattern (inside out)





On 8/25/2019 3:02 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:

You're looking at the backside view of most dreadnaught ends (with variations
in the number of ribs and panels). Some call them "reverse dreadnaughts" and I've
heard "inverse dreadnaught" as well.
     I don't see this as a reverse end at all. I think people are being confused by the two wider ribs, probably located at seams where pieces of the end are joined together. It might be a RECESSED end, in which the corrugations look pressed INTO the end, rather than proud of its surface, but I'm not sure if that's the case.

Tony Thompson
tony@...

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts