Date   
Re: [MFCL] ART #200 - #299 36 ft. reefer

Donald B. Valentine
 

Hello Ed,

    I want to thank you not only for the full information on this ART car, which I had somehow looked right by in my 1931 CarBuilders, but more for the
generosity you have continually provided to those of us with an interest in older rolling stock. From my own research on some subjects I can imagine
the hours u have invested in collecting what you have. I see it as an investment, a great investment in time and effort, which has been such a
precious resource for all of us with whom you have shared it. So thank you once again.

   I do not know where this will lead but am still trying to determine what the cars were that Bill Aldrich remembers so well from his high school days at
the end of WW II when he and his father, a New Haven executive, would often go to a nearby New Haven station to watch at least two of The Four Horseman
roll by in the early evening, the second of which always always had a number of yellow sided reefers with truss rods that were loaded with freshly caught
fish for the markets of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington. Bill will be 90 in two weeks and is hopeful that someone will recall whose cars
the were so he can model them correctly. He has been a good friend for many years so I'm doing what I can to assist as he has nothing to do with
computers.

My best to all, Don Valentine

Re: Latest from My Workbench - Tank Cars

s shaffer
 

Nice work on the tank cars Bruce. Your blog mentions using a grit blaster and baking soda to prep the truck side frames for painting.

Does anyone know if baking soda will flow through a Paasche Air Eraser?

Steve Shaffer

Interesting Wording Stenciled On Automobile Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo courtesy of Bob McGlone on the Early Rail Group:

 

The stencil reads, "Use Only For Automobile Traffic". These days I take this to mean put all the traffic on the road ahead of me in this boxcar. I wish.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Oregon short line stock cars

Charlie Vlk
 

Brad-

CB&Q SM16 stock cars were 36’ and lasted well into the BN era (not renumbered AFAIK) and even past the movement of livestock being used to carry ties.   I don’t have the stats to back this up but as I recall they were more prevalent on the East End (aka racetrack)  than the 40’ Q stock cars and certainly the stretched Mathers.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Breyer via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, September 6, 2019 9:05 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

>>Seeking any images or confirmation that 36 ‘ stock cars existed in the 1930/40 time period 

>>Brad Andonian 


Just crack open a few ORERS, and you'll have all the evidence you'll ever need.


12/1930 ORER:

OSL - 2887

OWR&N - 544

LA&SL - 191

UP - 2733

(100% of the stock car fleet were under 40' long)

 

1/1945 ORER:

OSL - 2034 (and 370 40-foot)

OWR&N - 464

LA&SL - 142

UP - 2287 (and 556 40-foot)

(84% of the stock fleet were short cars)

 

1/1955 ORER:

OSL 6 (and 334 40-foot)

OWR&N - 1

UP - 929 (and 2069 40-foot)

(28% of the stock fleet were short cars)

 

1/1959 ORER:

UP - 840 (and 2683 40-foot)

(24% of the stock car fleet were short cars)

 

 

Ray Breyer

Elgin, IL

Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

Bob Chaparro
 

Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

The Illinois State Library Digital Archives has nearly 300 photos available on this link:

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/search/searchterm/photograph%20(all%20forms)!boxcar/field/format!all/mode/exact!all/conn/and!all/order/nosort/ad/asc

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

gary laakso
 

Bob:  What a great resource!  Thank you very much for sharing.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, September 6, 2019 11:25 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

 

Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

The Illinois State Library Digital Archives has nearly 300 photos available on this link:

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/search/searchterm/photograph%20(all%20forms)!boxcar/field/format!all/mode/exact!all/conn/and!all/order/nosort/ad/asc

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

Bob Chaparro
 

Also, if you substitute the name of another type car in the search box there are other P-S car photos available.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

Schuyler Larrabee
 

RTR.  I s’pose I could disassemble the kit to try to get it off.  I may end up buying a couple of kits to get this done.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2019 12:26 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

 


is it a kit or RTR?

if a kit, I'd just strip the tank and repaint it. Small amounts of lettering can be
removed easily enough with various techniques, but
CONOCO is a lot to remove and
even if successful the underlying paint may still reveal it as "ghost" lettering.




On 9/4/2019 11:12 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io wrote:

I should have asked this years ago. 

 

I have a couple of these which are lettered CONOCO.  I would very much like to remove the lettering, but I’d also like not to lose the silver paint on the tank, because the scheme I will finish the car with is silver as well, with the same parting lines between the silver and the black frame.

 

However, I have tried everything I know has been recommended for removing lettering, short of my air eraser, to remove the lettering.  Nothing seemed to touch the lettering – or the silver paint, for that matter.

 

I’m reluctant to simply paint over the lettering, as it has some relief from the tank itself, and I’m pretty sure it would easily be visible as a “painted that over, huh?’ model.  Not the desired result.

 

Suggestions?

 

Schuyler

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I have not, Fenton.  I was really hoping to avoid having to dunk the car in anything, since I’ve generally had success with alcohol or some other solvent using Q-tips.  But evidently that’s not going to work this time.

 

Thanks for the suggestion.  And after reading Tim’s note about getting paint, but not lettering, off with the Accupaint stripper, I’m more inclined to go to Scalecoat’s paint remover.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of O Fenton Wells
Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2019 7:21 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

 

Schuyler, have you tried Scalecoat paint remover?  I use it for removing paint and stripping cars.It will take off more than the lettering.

 

--

Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

Re: Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

Charles Harris
 

Hi
I have tried to change the description to tank car etc but it wont work.  Just goes to  Photographs!

How do you change?

Thanks

Re: Many, Many Pullman Standard Boxcar Builder Photos

mvlandsw
 

Use the Advanced Search box at the upper right.

Mark Vinski

Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

Tim O'Connor
 


Or Solvaset on a piece of paper towel left overnight on the lettering.

Follow up with grit blasting. And repaint.




On 9/6/2019 7:52 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io wrote:
RTR.  I s’pose I could disassemble the kit to try to get it off.  I may end up buying a couple of kits to get this done.

 

Schuyler



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Oregon short line stock cars

Allan Smith
 

Oregon Short Line 36' Stock Cars

I have a file  Diagrams Union Pacific Freight Cars 1926 Oregon Short Line Folio 1500 That has diagrams of the S-30 36' OSL stock Cars. I got it off the internet But can't now access it. If anyone can find that file, it will give you the drawings for the cars you requested.

Al Smith
Sonora CA

On Friday, September 6, 2019, 10:59:12 AM PDT, Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:


Brad-

CB&Q SM16 stock cars were 36’ and lasted well into the BN era (not renumbered AFAIK) and even past the movement of livestock being used to carry ties.   I don’t have the stats to back this up but as I recall they were more prevalent on the East End (aka racetrack)  than the 40’ Q stock cars and certainly the stretched Mathers.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Breyer via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, September 6, 2019 9:05 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

>>Seeking any images or confirmation that 36 ‘ stock cars existed in the 1930/40 time period 

>>Brad Andonian 


Just crack open a few ORERS, and you'll have all the evidence you'll ever need.


12/1930 ORER:

OSL - 2887

OWR&N - 544

LA&SL - 191

UP - 2733

(100% of the stock car fleet were under 40' long)

 

1/1945 ORER:

OSL - 2034 (and 370 40-foot)

OWR&N - 464

LA&SL - 142

UP - 2287 (and 556 40-foot)

(84% of the stock fleet were short cars)

 

1/1955 ORER:

OSL 6 (and 334 40-foot)

OWR&N - 1

UP - 929 (and 2069 40-foot)

(28% of the stock fleet were short cars)

 

1/1959 ORER:

UP - 840 (and 2683 40-foot)

(24% of the stock car fleet were short cars)

 

 

Ray Breyer

Elgin, IL

Re: Crappy Job

Douglas Harding
 

Manure was a commodity that could be sold. The most common use was as fertilizer. You can buy bags of it today at home centers. Every stockyard, sale barn, feed lot, and slaughter house had to have a plan for dealing with the manure that accumulated from handling livestock. Large stockyards had carts or wagons with work crews who picked it up every day. If not sold locally it was loaded into gons and shipped somewhere. Sometimes it was placed in large bags for shipment. Thus railroads handled gons and boxcars loaded with the stuff. Farmers and gardeners put it on their fields and gardens. Horse manure is favored because of the large amount of straw and hay often mixed in with the manure.

 

I have additional photos of manure and freight cars.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Re: Oregon short line stock cars

Douglas Harding
 

Brad certain roads preferred 36’ cars up to the end of livestock movements. Attached is a spreadsheet I created some time back that shows stockcars for the CNW, CGW, Omaha, & M&StL showing the years 1941, 1943, 1953 and 1960. It includes their length. Noticed the dominance of 36’ cars for the CNW and Omaha roads. I think you will see similar preference for 36’ cars on the CB&Q and MILW. As suggested an ORER will quickly show the information you seek. I’m not at home, so not able to access the copies I have.

 

Attached are a few photos.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Andonian via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:06 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

Seeking any images or confirmation that 36 ‘ stock cars existed in the 1930/40 time period 

 

Many thanks

Brad Andonian 


Re: Oregon short line stock cars

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Doug,

It occurs to me that a preference and survival factor for 36' or 37' foot stock cars might have been to fit existing multiple loading/unloading chutes at major stock yards, packing plants, or railroad-owned rest stations. Rebuilding chutes and pens to fit 40' cars would have been an expense both railroads and customers would have wanted to avoid, particularly in the face of increasing truck competition by the 1950s. After WWII, new or modernized plants might have been designed with 40' cars in mind.
 
Of course some roads had both 37' and 40' cars, and some even longer by the 1950s (B&O, PRR and NKP come to mind). Length may have depended greatly on customer needs, including the type of livestock shipped. The WP dealt with a lot of pig shipments on a fixed route, and double-deck 37' cars worked fine, yet they also had both 37' and 40' single-deck cars chiefly for cattle. It was the 37' double-deck pig cars that lasted the longest. The D&RGW rebuilt 36' boxcars into stock cars up into the war years, but their new/rebuilt post-war cars were 40'. The majority of both lengths were double-decked to carry sheep (especially) or calves, though some classes had lower decks with enough head room for full-grown cows.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 9/7/2019 1:43 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Brad certain roads preferred 36’ cars up to the end of livestock movements. Attached is a spreadsheet I created some time back that shows stockcars for the CNW, CGW, Omaha, & M&StL showing the years 1941, 1943, 1953 and 1960. It includes their length. Noticed the dominance of 36’ cars for the CNW and Omaha roads. I think you will see similar preference for 36’ cars on the CB&Q and MILW. As suggested an ORER will quickly show the information you seek. I’m not at home, so not able to access the copies I have.

 

Attached are a few photos.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Andonian via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:06 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

Seeking any images or confirmation that 36 ‘ stock cars existed in the 1930/40 time period 

 

Many thanks

Brad Andonian 



Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

O Fenton Wells
 

I don't dunk.  I lay the car on newspaper and paint the paint remover on one side and the ends and let it sit then take it to the deep sink and wash it off.  It takes a few times of doing this but I use much less stripper and get better control.
I still dunk my donuts however

On Fri, Sep 6, 2019 at 8:07 PM Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io <schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I have not, Fenton.  I was really hoping to avoid having to dunk the car in anything, since I’ve generally had success with alcohol or some other solvent using Q-tips.  But evidently that’s not going to work this time.

 

Thanks for the suggestion.  And after reading Tim’s note about getting paint, but not lettering, off with the Accupaint stripper, I’m more inclined to go to Scalecoat’s paint remover.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of O Fenton Wells
Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2019 7:21 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

 

Schuyler, have you tried Scalecoat paint remover?  I use it for removing paint and stripping cars.It will take off more than the lettering.

 

--

Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

Re: Oregon short line stock cars

William Hirt
 

To add to Doug's info, this is a roster of CB&Q 36' stock cars as of January 1, 1966. As they were all built in the mid-late 1920s, they existed in the 1939/40 time frame and as Charlie Vlk noted well into the BN era.

55950-56199 SM. 36' Stock Car. Steel Underframe. Class SM-18-A. Built 1928 at CB&Q Galesburg. Series #55950-56199.
56200-56699 SM. 36' Stock Car. Steel Underframe. Class SM-18-A. Built 1928 at CB&Q Galesburg. Series #56200-56699. 
56700-56924 SM. 36' Stock Car. Steel Underframe. Class SM-18. Built 1927 at CB&Q Galesburg. Series #56700-56924. 200 cars leased to FW&DC in 1943 (series #56700-57447) and renumbered FW&DC Series #3001-3200.
56925-56949 SM. 36' Stock Car. Steel Underframe. Class SM-18. Built 1926 at CB&Q Aurora. Series #56925-56949. 200 cars leased to FW&DC in 1943 (series #56700-57447) and renumbered FW&DC Series #3001-3200.
56950-57449 SM. 36' Stock Car. Steel Underframe. Class SM-18. Built 1926 at CB&Q Aurora. Series #56950-57449. 200 cars leased to FW&DC in 1943 (series #56700-57447) and renumbered FW&DC Series #3001-3200.
58000-58999 SM. 36' Stock Car. Steel Underframe. Class SM-16. Built 1924 at CB&Q Streator. Series #58000-58999. Some cars this series equipped with Double Deck. Photo in Freight Cars of the 40's and 50's on p82 (car 58214D). Photo in Freight Car Color Portfolio Book 1 (Paul Winters 1960-1980) on p42 (car 58560D).
59000-59499 SM. 36' Stock Car. Steel Underframe. Class SM-16. Built 1922 by ACF. Series #59000-59499.

On live stock, I  recently received my copy of Santa Fe Livestock Operations by Steve Sandifer. If you have any interest at all in livestock operations, you want a copy of this book. Numerous stories and info from the Santa Fe files that is applicable to a number of railroads modeling stock operations.

Bill Hirt

On 9/7/2019 12:43 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Brad certain roads preferred 36’ cars up to the end of livestock movements. Attached is a spreadsheet I created some time back that shows stockcars for the CNW, CGW, Omaha, & M&StL showing the years 1941, 1943, 1953 and 1960. It includes their length. Noticed the dominance of 36’ cars for the CNW and Omaha roads. I think you will see similar preference for 36’ cars on the CB&Q and MILW. As suggested an ORER will quickly show the information you seek. I’m not at home, so not able to access the copies I have.

 

Attached are a few photos.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

_._,_._,_

Re: Oregon short line stock cars

Douglas Harding
 

OSL 1926 Freight Car diagrams can be found at https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Union-Pacific-Equip-Diagrams/OSL-1926-Freight-Cars/i-krT4w2W

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 12:43 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

Brad certain roads preferred 36’ cars up to the end of livestock movements. Attached is a spreadsheet I created some time back that shows stockcars for the CNW, CGW, Omaha, & M&StL showing the years 1941, 1943, 1953 and 1960. It includes their length. Noticed the dominance of 36’ cars for the CNW and Omaha roads. I think you will see similar preference for 36’ cars on the CB&Q and MILW. As suggested an ORER will quickly show the information you seek. I’m not at home, so not able to access the copies I have.

 

Attached are a few photos.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Andonian via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:06 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

Seeking any images or confirmation that 36 ‘ stock cars existed in the 1930/40 time period 

 

Many thanks

Brad Andonian 

Re: Oregon short line stock cars

Douglas Harding
 

Garth you are correct. Many livestock handling facilities were originally set for 36’ cars. But as they were built of wood, which deteriorates when exposed to corrosive elements like urine, pens and chutes were repaired and even rebuilt, and 40 cars could be accommodated. Every road I cited did have 40’ cars, especially as they moved to all steel cars. The CB&Q also had 50’ Mather stockcars after the time of this list. The UP had 60’ cars. And then there was NP’s 86’ pig palace cars.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Garth Groff
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 3:52 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

Doug,

It occurs to me that a preference and survival factor for 36' or 37' foot stock cars might have been to fit existing multiple loading/unloading chutes at major stock yards, packing plants, or railroad-owned rest stations. Rebuilding chutes and pens to fit 40' cars would have been an expense both railroads and customers would have wanted to avoid, particularly in the face of increasing truck competition by the 1950s. After WWII, new or modernized plants might have been designed with 40' cars in mind.
 
Of course some roads had both 37' and 40' cars, and some even longer by the 1950s (B&O, PRR and NKP come to mind). Length may have depended greatly on customer needs, including the type of livestock shipped. The WP dealt with a lot of pig shipments on a fixed route, and double-deck 37' cars worked fine, yet they also had both 37' and 40' single-deck cars chiefly for cattle. It was the 37' double-deck pig cars that lasted the longest. The D&RGW rebuilt 36' boxcars into stock cars up into the war years, but their new/rebuilt post-war cars were 40'. The majority of both lengths were double-decked to carry sheep (especially) or calves, though some classes had lower decks with enough head room for full-grown cows.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 9/7/2019 1:43 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Brad certain roads preferred 36’ cars up to the end of livestock movements. Attached is a spreadsheet I created some time back that shows stockcars for the CNW, CGW, Omaha, & M&StL showing the years 1941, 1943, 1953 and 1960. It includes their length. Noticed the dominance of 36’ cars for the CNW and Omaha roads. I think you will see similar preference for 36’ cars on the CB&Q and MILW. As suggested an ORER will quickly show the information you seek. I’m not at home, so not able to access the copies I have.

 

Attached are a few photos.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Andonian via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:06 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Oregon short line stock cars

 

Seeking any images or confirmation that 36 ‘ stock cars existed in the 1930/40 time period 

 

Many thanks

Brad Andonian