Date   
Re: Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Nice and inspirational Bill.  Thanks for sharing.

Bill



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@...>
Date: 12/9/19 2:59 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

Years ago when Al Westerfield was beginning the process of selling his business he let his customers know it might be a good idea to place an order just in case. I ordered several kits just in case. Currently I am building two models from this order, both 40-foot truss boxcars, a GN with Murphy ends and CB&Q with early Dreadnaught ends. There are similarities like the XLA roofs and 5-foot wide door openings plus both utilized underframes with eight truss rods although the spacing between the truss rods was different. I thought I would share a few photos of each so modelers could see and compare the two.

One variation from the CB&Q kit instructions is how I built the ends ladders. One of the right side ladder stiles was missing from the kit so I substituted strip styrene using the cast-on left side stile to sort out the grab iron spacing and before mounting them on the car ends I drilled #79 holes. Then once I attached these parts using the holes already drilled in the styrene, I drilled through the resin ends to create rigid and easy assembly for the wire parts.

With the brake lines and rods in place I will proceed to assemble the truss rods beginning with the two pair of inside rods and working towards the sides. Building a model with so many truss rods is akin to building a sailing ship with all of its rigging. The AB brake parts need to fit between the Queen Posts so their height will not interfere with the truss rods meaning some dry fitting of various parts is important before anything is glued in place. Patience is important here.

Bill Welch

Re: State of Maine 1932 ARA

Tim O'Connor
 

Gene

I think the repainting began in 1952. The cars began to be renumbered in 1950, I think,
but the numbers were just "patched" at that time.




On 12/8/2019 5:39 PM, Gene Deimling wrote:
When did the Bangor and Aroostook start applying the three color State of Maine scheme to their 1932 ARA boxcars?


Thanks
Gene Deimling 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Another "What do I do with this" quiz

Dave Parker
 

There is lots of good info on the Accurail model, and how it relates to specific CN cars in the Hendrickson article that Eric provided the link for in message 168561.  IMO, the model needs some minor bashing to to be accurate, and there are opportunities for some upgrades as well.  Richard's article is a "must read" if you want to make a prototypically correct car out of the Accurail (again, IMO).
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA

Re: Another "What do I do with this" quiz

Clark Propst
 

Rob Kirkham wrote: "The Accurail car is excellent for a CNR car."
I've got a F&C CN SS car waiting for Black Cat decals. Would the Accurail model be the same car? If not what series would the model be in?

Thanks Rod and all,
CW Propst

Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

Bill Welch
 

Years ago when Al Westerfield was beginning the process of selling his business he let his customers know it might be a good idea to place an order just in case. I ordered several kits just in case. Currently I am building two models from this order, both 40-foot truss boxcars, a GN with Murphy ends and CB&Q with early Dreadnaught ends. There are similarities like the XLA roofs and 5-foot wide door openings plus both utilized underframes with eight truss rods although the spacing between the truss rods was different. I thought I would share a few photos of each so modelers could see and compare the two.

One variation from the CB&Q kit instructions is how I built the ends ladders. One of the right side ladder stiles was missing from the kit so I substituted strip styrene using the cast-on left side stile to sort out the grab iron spacing and before mounting them on the car ends I drilled #79 holes. Then once I attached these parts using the holes already drilled in the styrene, I drilled through the resin ends to create rigid and easy assembly for the wire parts.

With the brake lines and rods in place I will proceed to assemble the truss rods beginning with the two pair of inside rods and working towards the sides. Building a model with so many truss rods is akin to building a sailing ship with all of its rigging. The AB brake parts need to fit between the Queen Posts so their height will not interfere with the truss rods meaning some dry fitting of various parts is important before anything is glued in place. Patience is important here.

Bill Welch

Re: Private-Plugging IM bodies

Kemal Mumcu
 

Why not 5 minute epoxy? Just curious.

Colin Meikle

Re: WP conversion

Paul Doggett
 

Cheers Garth 

I am sanding the roof down it will have to do as a stand in as there’s nothing else available as far as I know.
Paul Doggett. England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 9 Dec 2019, at 10:36, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


Friends,

While I am loath to argue with Tony about this, I find no evidence or mention of roof replacements to the WP 15001-series boxcars. I have copies of several of the general arrangement diagrams for cars in this series, including the 26001-series in plaster service, 8051-8055 (the last in general service circa 1947, see below), the 75001-series stock cars (which had "single-board" roofs, suggesting the original steel claddding was removed), various cars converted to MW service, and numerous photos in my collection and in several WP books. None offer any indication for roof conversions except the stock cars. I can't say it didn't happen, but I will remain unconvinced until somebody finds photographic or documentary evidence.

The 8051-8055 group should be of particular interest to Fred. The general arrangement drawing was reworked 3-28-47 (only the car numbers were changed). These were apparently the last five such cars in general service, if indeed they actually were still in use. I have the WP July 1949 ORER sheets, and these cars are gone from the roster, as are all the 15001-cars. The 8051 series apparently had a very short life with those numbers.

I suggest the Accurail roof should be sanded smooth and Archer seams added. The car is way too tall to be even a good stand-in (they had just an 8-foot IH, and were 12' 10" and change at the roof peak), which was why I disposed of my examples long ago. 

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff 🦆


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 9:17 PM Rich C via Groups.Io <rhcdmc=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It will look great when you give it The Doggett Weathering magic

On Saturday, December 7, 2019, 07:48:23 AM CST, Paul Doggett via Groups.Io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hi guys

The Accurail conversion is ready for painting and decals for WP I have left the original roof as Tony Thompson reckons some got steel roofs at some stage. The kit bashing is not perfect as I reckon it’s slightly to high but will be a reasonable stand in.


Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


Re: WP conversion

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

While I am loath to argue with Tony about this, I find no evidence or mention of roof replacements to the WP 15001-series boxcars. I have copies of several of the general arrangement diagrams for cars in this series, including the 26001-series in plaster service, 8051-8055 (the last in general service circa 1947, see below), the 75001-series stock cars (which had "single-board" roofs, suggesting the original steel claddding was removed), various cars converted to MW service, and numerous photos in my collection and in several WP books. None offer any indication for roof conversions except the stock cars. I can't say it didn't happen, but I will remain unconvinced until somebody finds photographic or documentary evidence.

The 8051-8055 group should be of particular interest to Fred. The general arrangement drawing was reworked 3-28-47 (only the car numbers were changed). These were apparently the last five such cars in general service, if indeed they actually were still in use. I have the WP July 1949 ORER sheets, and these cars are gone from the roster, as are all the 15001-cars. The 8051 series apparently had a very short life with those numbers.

I suggest the Accurail roof should be sanded smooth and Archer seams added. The car is way too tall to be even a good stand-in (they had just an 8-foot IH, and were 12' 10" and change at the roof peak), which was why I disposed of my examples long ago. 

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff 🦆


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 9:17 PM Rich C via Groups.Io <rhcdmc=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It will look great when you give it The Doggett Weathering magic

On Saturday, December 7, 2019, 07:48:23 AM CST, Paul Doggett via Groups.Io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hi guys

The Accurail conversion is ready for painting and decals for WP I have left the original roof as Tony Thompson reckons some got steel roofs at some stage. The kit bashing is not perfect as I reckon it’s slightly to high but will be a reasonable stand in.


Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


Re: Made a start (WP SS boxcar)

Paul Doggett
 

Fred 
thanks for the information.
Paul 


On 8 Dec 2019, at 20:36, Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Paul,

the roof consists of overlapping steel sheets, nothing more (no battens like the Accurail car has).
10 sheets of 3’5” and 2 of 3’-3 7/16"
This never changed.

cheers,
Fred

Re: Stencil: Heavy Repairs

Paul Woods
 

I'm particularly interested in those substantial cast brackets supporting the framing for the roof platforms - that's not something I have ever noticed on a car before.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ

NYCSHS #7172



---- On Mon, 09 Dec 2019 16:01:19 +1300 Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote ----


  ... or how about the ties to the right of the car with round "corners" ... I'm
certain they held in the ballast well ... LOL.  





Re: Plugging IM bodies

Charlie Vlk
 

An old trick is to take some plastic sprue and heat it over a open flame or a soldering iron As it starts to melt pull on the end and stretch it thin. Cut it in the center and push it in the hole from the outside until the resulting tapered plug is snug. Use liquid cement on the inside to glue in place. When set cut off flush on interior and exterior.
Charlie Vlk

On Dec 8, 2019, at 8:59 PM, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I’m working on an Intermountain box car and I need to plug some of the holes in the body to re-detail it. I have found I don’t have an appropriate diameter styrene rod. What I have is too small. Since I have to order some anyway what’s the correct one.

Brian J. Carlson


Private-Plugging IM bodies

Andy Carlson
 

Brian, I have a very useful technique for plugging holes on styrene bodies. 1st step is to place a stretched piece of scotch tape over the hole's opening. 2nd is to use Ace Hardware 2-ton epoxy and fill the taped-over hole from behind with the epoxy. I use a toothpick, and the clearness of the tape allows the visual siting of a full fill without voids. 3rd is to simply remove the tape the next day. After rubbing the residual stickyness from the tape with your finger tips you are ready for paint. I use this technique a lot and it works quite well for me.

If you fill that the hole is too small, simply ream it larger, which I have done a few times. If you can't find the Ace epoxy (Never use 5-minute epoxy) use JB original epoxy from auto part stores..
-Andy

On Sunday, December 8, 2019, 6:59:18 PM PST, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361@...> wrote:


I’m working on an Intermountain box car and I need to plug some of the holes in the body to re-detail it. I have found I don’t have an appropriate diameter styrene rod. What I have is too small.  Since I have to order some anyway what’s the correct one.

Brian J. Carlson


Re: Plugging IM bodies

Benjamin Hom
 

Brian Carlson asked:
"I’m working on an Intermountain box car and I need to plug some of the holes in the body to re-detail it. I have found I don’t have an appropriate diameter styrene rod. What I have is too small.  Since I have to order some anyway what’s the correct one."

You could stretch styrene sprue to make your own rod.


Ben Hom


Re: Stencil: Heavy Repairs

Jim Betz
 


  ... or how about the ties to the right of the car with round "corners" ... I'm
certain they held in the ballast well ... LOL.  

Re: Plugging IM bodies

Joseph
 

Brian,
I usually use .035, sometimes 1/16
Joe Binish

On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 8:59 PM Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I’m working on an Intermountain box car and I need to plug some of the holes in the body to re-detail it. I have found I don’t have an appropriate diameter styrene rod. What I have is too small.  Since I have to order some anyway what’s the correct one.

Brian J. Carlson



Plugging IM bodies

Brian Carlson
 

I’m working on an Intermountain box car and I need to plug some of the holes in the body to re-detail it. I have found I don’t have an appropriate diameter styrene rod. What I have is too small. Since I have to order some anyway what’s the correct one.

Brian J. Carlson

Re: Photo: Buffalo. Rochester & Pittsburgh Ry Box Car

mel perry
 

bob:
it boils down to semantics, the MCB had
their own definition, you hsve to remember this was a transistory period
from single sheat to double sheat and
an increase of weight and stress
mel perry

On Sun, Dec 8, 2019, 6:38 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
So you are saying "pocket coupler", as stenciled on the car, is the same as "coupler pocket"?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: Stencil: Heavy Repairs

Bob Chaparro
 

Yes, I originally was attracted to that. This photo is now part of my presentation on chalk markings.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: Photo: Buffalo. Rochester & Pittsburgh Ry Box Car

Bob Chaparro
 

So you are saying "pocket coupler", as stenciled on the car, is the same as "coupler pocket"?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: Another "What do I do with this" quiz

Robert kirkham
 

Well, I have to disagree on the CPR car. The CPR cars (built in the 23XXXX series; many re-built and renumbered by Clark's era) used hat section trusses, not Zs used on the Accurail car. A closer model to CPR is the Tichy USRA single sheathed boxcar with 7/8 ends, although the roof and other details are imperfect and the overall car width is slightly wide.

The Accurail car is excellent for a CNR car.

Rob Kirkham

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of David via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, December 8, 2019 9:56 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Another "What do I do with this" quiz

Out of the box, it's good for the Canadian Pacific cars it was modeled after. Light modifications will get you DM&N 3300-3399.

David Thompson