Date   
Re: Shipping Fish

Drew Bunn
 

"Fresh fish" are a perishable, whereas "live fish" would be considered livestock. They need to be treated differently.  

CN ran fish in overnight passenger trains between Halifax and Boston utilizing Express Reefers with high speed trucks and steam lines. 

But I think fish are rarely shipped live.

On Fri., Jan. 3, 2020, 20:21 Ted Schnepf, <railsunl@...> wrote:
Hi Bob,

Fresh fish to me means, live fish shipped in aeration tanks, in baggage cars for the kosher trade.

For a refrigerator load, I assume you mean processed fish.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353


On Friday, January 3, 2020, 02:31:19 PM CST, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:


Shipping Fish

Where there any rules restricting refrigerator cars to fresh fish loads once they had been used to ship fresh fish?

Or did this depend on how the fist were packaged?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: What type of vegetation is traveling on the DRGW?

Robert kirkham
 

Question/guess: Could it be sheep’s wool -i.e. the bits from a packing plant?  They used to send carcasses and offal in gons so  . . .

 

I find the half-track at this link pretty cool too! https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Salt-Lake-City/i-VSqDg9t/A

 

Rob

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Drew Bunn
Sent: Friday, January 3, 2020 6:00 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] What type of vegetation is traveling on the DRGW?

 

Grapes?

 

On Fri., Jan. 3, 2020, 19:46 gary laakso, <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

The way that it drapes over the side of the car suggests a plant with strong branches:

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Salt-Lake-City/i-RvgFS9p/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

Re: another crane shot

mofwcaboose
 

Obviously a work train, probably unloading rail sections.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...>
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Jan 3, 2020 10:56 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] another crane shot

Bill;

Here's another:


Elden Gatwood


Re: What type of vegetation is traveling on the DRGW?

Drew Bunn
 

Grapes?


On Fri., Jan. 3, 2020, 19:46 gary laakso, <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

The way that it drapes over the side of the car suggests a plant with strong branches:

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Salt-Lake-City/i-RvgFS9p/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

Re: For Sale NEW L&N Shippers Guide

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

Just picked these new shippers guides from the printer yesterday.  This is my first guide covering part of the southeastern US.

It covers the Louisville and Nashville RR, all the way from Illinois and Ohio to Florida and Louisiana, and all states in between.  There are only two dates in the book, with the L&N map being dated 1939, so am guessing a per war publication date of 1940. The book has 163 pages, with a comb binding, so it opens flat for easy use.

The book is produced by Reynolds & Reynolds (printing) of Dayton, Oh.  They have published several other books I sell, such as, UP, CNW, RI, and Milwaukee.  The industries are listed by type, and then by state and town in alphabetical order.  This L&N book seems to be more elaborate with a larger forward section, explaining industries along the L&N.  There is also 6 pages listing LCL routes.

The book sells for $34.95. plus $5.00 shipping if needed.  It is not on my website yet.  Contact me off list to order any of the shippers guides.  there are now twenty one titles.

Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353



Re: ATSF Boxcar 274525 gets galvanized running boards

bigfourroad
 

Lester
Great job on this "redo" and I must say a bit intrepid to highlight the grating or expanded metal parts.
BTW the useful tips on beauty swabs and the article right below this on on your blog will be much appreciated when it (finally) comes time to build that Smokey Mountain Model Works CB&Q flatcar in S Scale. 
Chris Rooney

Re: Shipping Fish

Ted Schnepf
 

Hi Bob,

Fresh fish to me means, live fish shipped in aeration tanks, in baggage cars for the kosher trade.

For a refrigerator load, I assume you mean processed fish.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353


On Friday, January 3, 2020, 02:31:19 PM CST, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Shipping Fish

Where there any rules restricting refrigerator cars to fresh fish loads once they had been used to ship fresh fish?

Or did this depend on how the fist were packaged?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

What type of vegetation is traveling on the DRGW?

gary laakso
 

The way that it drapes over the side of the car suggests a plant with strong branches:

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Salt-Lake-City/i-RvgFS9p/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

Re: Can anyone tell me anything about the "Safcar" running board and step?

Brian Carlson
 

Much earlier since it’s a builders photo of a 1940 built X38. Great pic!!

Brian J. Carlson

On Jan 3, 2020, at 7:13 PM, Bill Daniels via Groups.Io <billinsf=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Nice photo... is there one of the side of the car? And my attention was drawn to the two tenders (from class L1s?) in the background. Makes me think that this photo was taken in the early (pre SK) 1950’s.

Bill Daniels
Santa Rosa, California


Can anyone tell me anything about the "Safcar" running board and step?

Andy Carlson
 

My now gone friend Jack Parker, who lived and breathed the Northern Pacific RR, detailed an O scale A5 NP brass Northern 4-8-4 back in the 1990s. He made the boiler running boards as exact as can be using the described method of straight and bent bars. It sure was spoiling for me to view that level of detail; it would be much harder of a challenge to execute a board this well in smaller scales. His son Jeff has this 1st place contest winner on display in the corridor leading to the NP HO scale railroad which Jack built 20 + years ago. Go look for it the next time you are there!
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Friday, January 3, 2020, 3:58:01 PM PST, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:


Yes.
The correct name is "Safkar", made by the Irving Iron Works Co., Long Island City, NY. The open grid is formed by alternating straight and zigzag bars, all running longitudinally, riveted together, forming a distinctive pattern of trapezoidal openings. 
Page in the '28 CBCyc shows use as passenger car step treads, mentioned being in use for 8 years. In the '31 Loco Cyc, they're shown as loco running boards and steps. Not found in the '40 CBCyc.
I've wondered about their possible use on freight cars, but don't recall ever seeing anything in print. I have a vague notion that I've seen something of the sort in the real world, long ago. So this photo is a cool find.

I'll try to post an image later.

Jack Mullen

Re: Can anyone tell me anything about the "Safcar" running board and step?

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Nice photo... is there one of the side of the car? And my attention was drawn to the two tenders (from class L1s?) in the background. Makes me think that this photo was taken in the early (pre SK) 1950’s.

Bill Daniels
Santa Rosa, California

Re: One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

Tom Madden
 

It's a non-issue. I just dug in the trash and found one of the casting fill tube stubs I remove from Resin Car Works reefer, boxcar and auto car bodies after demolding. Photo attached. I snap these off and they break almost flush with the underside of the roof so there's no "blob" left, but even if I left them on the whole stub weighs only 1.2 grams. That's all of 0.04 ounces. It's 3/16" diameter and 1 3/4" long. No effect on the center of gravity.

Tom Madden

Re: Can anyone tell me anything about the "Safcar" running board and step?

Jack Mullen
 

Yes.
The correct name is "Safkar", made by the Irving Iron Works Co., Long Island City, NY. The open grid is formed by alternating straight and zigzag bars, all running longitudinally, riveted together, forming a distinctive pattern of trapezoidal openings. 
Page in the '28 CBCyc shows use as passenger car step treads, mentioned being in use for 8 years. In the '31 Loco Cyc, they're shown as loco running boards and steps. Not found in the '40 CBCyc.
I've wondered about their possible use on freight cars, but don't recall ever seeing anything in print. I have a vague notion that I've seen something of the sort in the real world, long ago. So this photo is a cool find.

I'll try to post an image later.

Jack Mullen

Re: One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I had a concern with several of the early one piece bodies in that there was a groove between the send and the sides.  This would happen with flat kits if the ends of the sides and the back of the ends were not perfectly flat.  Pn the flatkitsthis was easily corrected.  I gave not bought any of the recent one piece offerings so I don't know if this problem persists.

One piece bodies are certainly a time saver.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>
Date: 1/3/20 12:50 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

My answer:  nothing.  I've only recently started to encounter one-piece bodies due to my backlog, and frankly I welcome them.  I've actually sold some flat kits when a different manufacturer made a one-piece version of the same car.

But to answer the question, the wall thickness is greater on the one-piece body, as a rule, and I've seen some that had a fair bit of resin on the inside, but not enough to matter in terms of CG.  I put two ounces of weight (fishing weights) in a 40' car, and I think that's enough to overcome the, perhaps, 0.1 to 0.2 ounce of extra resin in the top of the car.  I've weighed several of them, so this is somewhat based on actual data.

I recently took a Dremel to the inside of a one-piece body, one of those where the resin is white, but that was to clean up numerous low nubbies at the bottom edge of the ID that prevented the floor from sitting properly and I couldn't get a file in there.  Did I mention that some of the one-piece bodies also have a ledge at the right point to help the floor sit straight?  That was an issue with some older flat kits sometimes.

Another reason I'm not so worried about extra weight inside the car is that it's common for me to glue a piece of ,125 x .250, or ..250 square, on the inside of the car side at the top to square up the side, while I'm assembling the box.  I'll cement the floor solidly to the bottom edge of the sides later, during final assembly when the floor is painted black and the sides and perhaps ends are different colors but the top edge being straight is the most critical because of the way some car sides of older prototypes meet the roof.

Ron Merrick

Re: One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

Bill Welch
 

I have assembled many one piece body kits and have many still in kit form. I have never seen one with a "big blob of resin on the underside of the roof."

Bill Welch

Re: One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

mopacfirst
 

My answer:  nothing.  I've only recently started to encounter one-piece bodies due to my backlog, and frankly I welcome them.  I've actually sold some flat kits when a different manufacturer made a one-piece version of the same car.

But to answer the question, the wall thickness is greater on the one-piece body, as a rule, and I've seen some that had a fair bit of resin on the inside, but not enough to matter in terms of CG.  I put two ounces of weight (fishing weights) in a 40' car, and I think that's enough to overcome the, perhaps, 0.1 to 0.2 ounce of extra resin in the top of the car.  I've weighed several of them, so this is somewhat based on actual data.

I recently took a Dremel to the inside of a one-piece body, one of those where the resin is white, but that was to clean up numerous low nubbies at the bottom edge of the ID that prevented the floor from sitting properly and I couldn't get a file in there.  Did I mention that some of the one-piece bodies also have a ledge at the right point to help the floor sit straight?  That was an issue with some older flat kits sometimes.

Another reason I'm not so worried about extra weight inside the car is that it's common for me to glue a piece of ,125 x .250, or ..250 square, on the inside of the car side at the top to square up the side, while I'm assembling the box.  I'll cement the floor solidly to the bottom edge of the sides later, during final assembly when the floor is painted black and the sides and perhaps ends are different colors but the top edge being straight is the most critical because of the way some car sides of older prototypes meet the roof.

Ron Merrick

One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

Rossiter, Mark W <Mark.Rossiter@...>
 

A quick question for the resin kit builders out there.  Most of the kit manufacturers nowadays are using one-piece bodies for box cars, rather than flat wall pieces.  In many ways I view this as a huge leap forward.  My question is what, if anything, do you do with the big blob of resin on the underside of the roof casting leftover from the mold/casting process?  Do you attempt to remove this or do you just leave it alone?  Seems to me it could affect the preferred center of gravity on cars intended for operation. 

Mark Rossiter 

Re: New Manufacturer Prototype Junction's 1st Project AT&SF Bx-11,12,13 and a RI, PLUS a CGW, L&N and PM/C&O

Fritz Milhaupt
 

I am finding the bit of "scope creep" that was added to the first release last night, the CGW, L&N and PM/C&O auto boxcars, to be very welcome.

See https://www.prototypejunction.com/2020/01/project-1-cgw-l-and-pmc-auto-cars.html

I can use a lot of the PM cars, they'll go nicely with door-and-a-half Speedwitch PM 88000-series cars.

-Fritz Milhaupt

Modeling Editor, Pere Marquette Historical Society, Inc.

 

Shipping Fish

Bob Chaparro
 

Shipping Fish

Where there any rules restricting refrigerator cars to fresh fish loads once they had been used to ship fresh fish?

Or did this depend on how the fist were packaged?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

Jon Miller
 

On 1/3/2020 10:28 AM, Bob Webber wrote:

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/thunderbird-and-gmail
And verify settings and options for openign file types.

Not sure what Thunderbird 38 is?  My setting is automatic update.  Under help it says my "version?" is 68.3.1 (32 bit)

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS