Date   

Re: One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

Tim O'Connor
 


I agree Bill.

The sad truth is that not many people can produce perfect 1 piece bodies. But
they are getting better! The RCW 50' SOO box car - no complaints!

Fixing serious warpage is really challenging - e.g. a "twist" in the body. Ugh!

If you've never seen one of Gene Fusco's one piece "Railyard" X58 box cars (or his
other cars) then you've really missed something.



On 1/4/2020 9:16 AM, william darnaby wrote:

As a final…or,maybe not…comment on one piece bodies, I have not found them to be a great time saver over flat kits because of issues that I run across.  Your mileage may vary but I have found that it takes time to clean up the bottom edges of the castings as there are lumps and bumps of resin.  I think some of these are vents or risers from the casting process.  I have had to do repair to these areas to get a clean and straight bottom sill on the sides and ends.  One car I assembled this summer had the corner of the sill so badly damaged I had to create a new corner with modelling putty.

 

Another issue is the shelf inside the body being uneven or not deep enough to allow the floor to sit down inside far enough to allow the crossmembers to sit behind the sill tabs.  It sometimes takes a fair amount of scraping with a square edged modelling knife to clean up that shelf.

 

Then there is the issue of warpage.  I have had to install pieces of quarter inch square styrene across the interior of the casting so the sides do not noticeably bow in.

 

Such is the resin world.  And, as I said, YMMV.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rossiter, Mark W
Sent: Saturday, January 4, 2020 5:08 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

 

Thanks to all who responded to my inquiry, on list and off.  Sounds like it is nothing to be concerned about. 

 

Mark Rossiter



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Shipping Fish

Dave Parker
 

If anybody is interested, here is a scan of the original article that includes the page number.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

Steven D Johnson
 

An article in the August 1963 issue of L&N’s company magazine shows this very car working with an L&N pile hammer-equipped crane in the rebuilding of a bridge over the Tensas River near Mobile, AL.  The tender assigned to this car was no. 40694, from L&N K-5 Pacific no. 268.

 

Steve Johnson

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of mofwcaboose via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, January 04, 2020 4:05 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

 

Several other railroads, notably the MP and subsidiaries, had similar cars. They were "weed scalders", used for weed control.

 

The L&N car is more likely used either to supply steam to a pile driver whose own boiler has been condemned, or, more likely, to supply steam to the hammer being used on a diesel pile driver or locomotive crane. Diesel hammers appeared  in the US around 1953 but were not much accepted at first, and a number of diesel cranes swinging a set of pile driver leads towed a car such as this to  supply steam for the steam hammer.

 

John C. La Rue, Jr.

Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Steven D Johnson <tenncentralrwy@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Jan 4, 2020 12:02 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

Ike,

 

Thanks for that photo!  I certainly agree with your statement that L&N had some of the oddest, home-built MofW equipment.

 

In the Morning Sun Books L&N Color Guide, Volume 2, page 87, there is a shot of this same car at Mobile, AL, in July 1968.  The flat car/low side gondola portion was painted “boxcar red,” while the “steam engine” was painted black.

 

Steve Johnson

Nashville, TN

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, January 03, 2020 11:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

 

While looking for Bucyrus cranes on flat cars, I re-discovered the attached photo of L&N MoW flat 41839 in a pile driver outfit 5-17-70 at Atlanta. (low res version attached)

It is from the Southern Railway Historical Assoc archives, Oscar Kimsey, Jr collection. (One of 459 items in Oscar's L&N MoW file). Of all the Southeastern railroads, the L&N may have some of the oddest, home-built MoW equipment.

Ike


Re: Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

Several other railroads, notably the MP and subsidiaries, had similar cars. They were "weed scalders", used for weed control.

The L&N car is more likely used either to supply steam to a pile driver whose own boiler has been condemned, or, more likely, to supply steam to the hammer being used on a diesel pile driver or locomotive crane. Diesel hammers appeared  in the US around 1953 but were not much accepted at first, and a number of diesel cranes swinging a set of pile driver leads towed a car such as this to  supply steam for the steam hammer.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Steven D Johnson <tenncentralrwy@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Jan 4, 2020 12:02 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

Ike,
 
Thanks for that photo!  I certainly agree with your statement that L&N had some of the oddest, home-built MofW equipment.
 
In the Morning Sun Books L&N Color Guide, Volume 2, page 87, there is a shot of this same car at Mobile, AL, in July 1968.  The flat car/low side gondola portion was painted “boxcar red,” while the “steam engine” was painted black.
 
Steve Johnson
Nashville, TN
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, January 03, 2020 11:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!
 
While looking for Bucyrus cranes on flat cars, I re-discovered the attached photo of L&N MoW flat 41839 in a pile driver outfit 5-17-70 at Atlanta. (low res version attached)

It is from the Southern Railway Historical Assoc archives, Oscar Kimsey, Jr collection. (One of 459 items in Oscar's L&N MoW file). Of all the Southeastern railroads, the L&N may have some of the oddest, home-built MoW equipment.

Ike


Re: Can anyone tell me anything about the "Safcar" running board and step?

Brian Carlson
 

Bill I see the paint code now and on the other Photos Bill lane posted of the car to the PRR list. 
Brian Carlson 


Re: DL&W 44078 (was Photo: SRLX Reefers)

ed_mines
 

Rob, a nice kit for these cars is available from F&C.


Re: Shipping Fish

Doug Paasch
 

Thanks Bob.  In reading this, I couldn’t make sense of one sentence so after some searching online, I found the same article.  Looks like a line was skipped in retyping it.  The sentence “No ice except that in the packages investigators say, to cover a load of fish with fine ice, or to place heavy ice “headers” on the barrels.”

 

should read:

 

No ice except that in the packages should be placed inside the car.  It is a great mistake, investigators say, to cover a load of fish with fine ice, or to place heavy ice “headers” on the barrels.

 

Doug Paasch

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, January 4, 2020 10:05 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Shipping Fish

 

And I did find this information.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
++++

The text below is from Refrigerating World, Volume 54, Issue 2 (September 1919).

TRANSPORTATION OF FISH

The speed at which fish decay is not so striking as the length of time that fish will keep under proper conditions. according to the Food Research Laboratory of the Bureau of Chemistry, United States Department of Agriculture. Investigations in the handling of fresh fish—from the catch to the consumer—which have been underway for several years, have shown that when refrigerator cars are properly iced and the fish are properly packed, they can be transported even in midsummer for distances requiring five days of travel, and they will reach the market in excellent condition for eating. In fact, fish so shipped will be much "fresher" at the markets than fish shipped without refrigeration in fast express cars for 24 hours or less.

For successful shipping of fish by freight in refrigerator cars, the investigators outline the following instructions:

Keep Fish Packages Off Floor

Select a refrigerator car that has doors and hatches so tight that not a ray of light can enter. If the car is not provided with a rack in the floor, build one, placing 2 by 4 stringers lengthwise of the floor and nailing crosswise slats —1 by 3 inches—about 11/; inches apart. No car of fresh fish should be shipped without a rack on the floor.

With the car prepared, the bunkers should be filled with ice at least 12 hours before loading. The pieces of ice should not be larger than a man’s fist. Just before the car is loaded the ice in the bunkers should be replenished, and on top of the ice should be placed coarse gray rock salt in the proportion of 5 percent of the ice. Most refrigerating cars will require from 3,500 to 5,000 pounds of ice in each bunker. If the capacity of the bunkers is not marked, it can be determined by counting the number of cakes used, in the case of artificial ice, or by rough weighing, in the case of natural ice. The amount of salt required ordinarily will vary between 170 and 250 pounds to each bunker.

Only Package Ice in Cars

Fish to be placed in the car must be in boxes or barrels, plentifully supplied with fine ice. They should be hurried into the car, that the doors may not be kept open any longer than necessary. As soon as the load is stowed, the doors should be closed and sealed, and the haul should begin as promptly as possible. No ice except that in the packages investigators say, to cover a load of fish with fine ice, or to place heavy ice “headers” on the barrels.

The same principle can be used with much success for the shipment of less-than-carload lots, provided the car is chilled when the trip is begun, and the trainmen close the doors promptly after each change in the lading.

Hauling fish in refrigerator cars under the conditions outlined does not harm the car by wetting the lining with fishy water to any greater extent than does ice-packed poultry or iced vegetables, and railroad officials will find value in knowledge of this fact, declare the investigators. They see no reason why fish so handled should not be loaded into refrigerator cars which, after unloading and airing, may go into other refrigerator service. Damage to refrigerator cars in fish traffic and much fish deterioration has been due to heavy meltage of ice in the fish packages, because the-car was not cold enough at the beginning to reduce the meltage. This difficulty can be overcome by salting the ice in the bunkers. During the haul, the bunkers in summer time must be iced and salted every 24 hours.

 


Re: Shipping Fish

Bob Chaparro
 

And I did find this information.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
++++

The text below is from Refrigerating World, Volume 54, Issue 2 (September 1919).

TRANSPORTATION OF FISH

The speed at which fish decay is not so striking as the length of time that fish will keep under proper conditions. according to the Food Research Laboratory of the Bureau of Chemistry, United States Department of Agriculture. Investigations in the handling of fresh fish—from the catch to the consumer—which have been underway for several years, have shown that when refrigerator cars are properly iced and the fish are properly packed, they can be transported even in midsummer for distances requiring five days of travel, and they will reach the market in excellent condition for eating. In fact, fish so shipped will be much "fresher" at the markets than fish shipped without refrigeration in fast express cars for 24 hours or less.

For successful shipping of fish by freight in refrigerator cars, the investigators outline the following instructions:

Keep Fish Packages Off Floor

Select a refrigerator car that has doors and hatches so tight that not a ray of light can enter. If the car is not provided with a rack in the floor, build one, placing 2 by 4 stringers lengthwise of the floor and nailing crosswise slats —1 by 3 inches—about 11/; inches apart. No car of fresh fish should be shipped without a rack on the floor.

With the car prepared, the bunkers should be filled with ice at least 12 hours before loading. The pieces of ice should not be larger than a man’s fist. Just before the car is loaded the ice in the bunkers should be replenished, and on top of the ice should be placed coarse gray rock salt in the proportion of 5 percent of the ice. Most refrigerating cars will require from 3,500 to 5,000 pounds of ice in each bunker. If the capacity of the bunkers is not marked, it can be determined by counting the number of cakes used, in the case of artificial ice, or by rough weighing, in the case of natural ice. The amount of salt required ordinarily will vary between 170 and 250 pounds to each bunker.

Only Package Ice in Cars

Fish to be placed in the car must be in boxes or barrels, plentifully supplied with fine ice. They should be hurried into the car, that the doors may not be kept open any longer than necessary. As soon as the load is stowed, the doors should be closed and sealed, and the haul should begin as promptly as possible. No ice except that in the packages investigators say, to cover a load of fish with fine ice, or to place heavy ice “headers” on the barrels.

The same principle can be used with much success for the shipment of less-than-carload lots, provided the car is chilled when the trip is begun, and the trainmen close the doors promptly after each change in the lading.

Hauling fish in refrigerator cars under the conditions outlined does not harm the car by wetting the lining with fishy water to any greater extent than does ice-packed poultry or iced vegetables, and railroad officials will find value in knowledge of this fact, declare the investigators. They see no reason why fish so handled should not be loaded into refrigerator cars which, after unloading and airing, may go into other refrigerator service. Damage to refrigerator cars in fish traffic and much fish deterioration has been due to heavy meltage of ice in the fish packages, because the-car was not cold enough at the beginning to reduce the meltage. This difficulty can be overcome by salting the ice in the bunkers. During the haul, the bunkers in summer time must be iced and salted every 24 hours.

 


Re: Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

Steven D Johnson
 

Ike,

 

Thanks for that photo!  I certainly agree with your statement that L&N had some of the oddest, home-built MofW equipment.

 

In the Morning Sun Books L&N Color Guide, Volume 2, page 87, there is a shot of this same car at Mobile, AL, in July 1968.  The flat car/low side gondola portion was painted “boxcar red,” while the “steam engine” was painted black.

 

Steve Johnson

Nashville, TN

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, January 03, 2020 11:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Certainly a "Steam Era" freight car!

 

While looking for Bucyrus cranes on flat cars, I re-discovered the attached photo of L&N MoW flat 41839 in a pile driver outfit 5-17-70 at Atlanta. (low res version attached)

It is from the Southern Railway Historical Assoc archives, Oscar Kimsey, Jr collection. (One of 459 items in Oscar's L&N MoW file). Of all the Southeastern railroads, the L&N may have some of the oddest, home-built MoW equipment.

Ike


Re: Shipping Fish

Doug Paasch
 

I found this tidbit on the internet about shipping frozen fish.

  https://spo.nmfs.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/legacy-pdfs/leaflet431.pdf

 

I, too, would be interested in the shipping of non-frozen dead fish in refrigerator cars.  I want to include shipments of freshly caught (dead) Salmon from Seattle fish docks on the GN using icing from the WFE ice dock at Interbay.  Did GN have any of its own reefers (ie, GN reporting mark) or did they only use WFEX/BREX/FGEX pool cars for reefer shipments of all kinds?  And for fish, were they limited to using only WFEX reefers since they owned them by subsidiary?  That is, were they prohibited from using BREX or FGEX reefers for fish?

 

Thanks,

    Doug Paasch

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, January 3, 2020 10:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Shipping Fish

 

OK, let me better define what I am asking about. I am asking about dead fish, either on ice or frozen.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Shipping Fish

Brian Termunde
 

I'd be interested in knowing about this, but in particular, oysters.

The area I model was (and still is) known for it's oysters. Willapa Harbor, Wash.

TIA!

 

Take Care,

 

Brian R. Termunde

Midvale, Utah

***************



Shipping Fish
From: Bob Chaparro
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 2020 12:31:07 PST

 

Shipping Fish

Where there any rules restricting refrigerator cars to fresh fish loads once they had been used to ship fresh fish?

Or did this depend on how the fist were packaged?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

HemetCA


Re: One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

william darnaby
 

As a final…or,maybe not…comment on one piece bodies, I have not found them to be a great time saver over flat kits because of issues that I run across.  Your mileage may vary but I have found that it takes time to clean up the bottom edges of the castings as there are lumps and bumps of resin.  I think some of these are vents or risers from the casting process.  I have had to do repair to these areas to get a clean and straight bottom sill on the sides and ends.  One car I assembled this summer had the corner of the sill so badly damaged I had to create a new corner with modelling putty.

 

Another issue is the shelf inside the body being uneven or not deep enough to allow the floor to sit down inside far enough to allow the crossmembers to sit behind the sill tabs.  It sometimes takes a fair amount of scraping with a square edged modelling knife to clean up that shelf.

 

Then there is the issue of warpage.  I have had to install pieces of quarter inch square styrene across the interior of the casting so the sides do not noticeably bow in.

 

Such is the resin world.  And, as I said, YMMV.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rossiter, Mark W
Sent: Saturday, January 4, 2020 5:08 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

 

Thanks to all who responded to my inquiry, on list and off.  Sounds like it is nothing to be concerned about. 

 

Mark Rossiter

 


Re: One-Piece Cast Resin Box Car Bodies

Rossiter, Mark W <Mark.Rossiter@...>
 

Thanks to all who responded to my inquiry, on list and off.  Sounds like it is nothing to be concerned about. 

 

Mark Rossiter

 


Re: Shipping Fish

np328
 

   I have written about this before.  
      While researching for refrigerator cars of the NP, I found a letter admonished a subordinate on his use of a class of refrigerator cars stating that - refrigerator cars, once used for fish, are unfit for anything other commodity. Fish service is where refrigerator cars go to die. I could try to dig it out if you really wanted to see it. Could take a bit of time as CCB is on the doorstep. This letter or telegram was prior to flash freezing of fish, so I think it would be fish on ice. (1920s - 1930s +/-)  
      I never found anything later in the 50's (in paperwork) that specified certain classes of cars to fish service. This in spite of there were numerous fish processing plants in WA state that shipped NP.  I have often wondered about the steel reefers. Would 40 tons of frozen fish sticks contaminate them? 
      I am mildly allergic to eating fish, so I tend to stay clear of fish that has been processed as an edible, (even in the frozen food section).                  Jim Dick - St. Paul 


Re: Shipping Fish

Bob Chaparro
 

OK, let me better define what I am asking about. I am asking about dead fish, either on ice or frozen.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: tank car assigned to American Extract Co, Port Allegany PA

Dave Boss
 

I would agree with you on the photo of the car, as I'm working on one of these tank cars right now. I'm using a builder photo but the reporting marks changed by the 1950's 

Dave

On Fri, Jan 3, 2020 at 10:47 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
In the background, we see a partial view of a tank car assigned to American Extract Co, Port Allegany PA.
 
 
 
 
Wish we could see more of the tank car!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Re: What type of vegetation is traveling on the DRGW?

Douglas Harding
 

Looks to be a load of used bedding from stockcars, ie manure and straw. The car is a drop bottom gon.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Drew Bunn
Sent: Friday, January 3, 2020 8:00 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] What type of vegetation is traveling on the DRGW?

 

Grapes?

 

On Fri., Jan. 3, 2020, 19:46 gary laakso, <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

The way that it drapes over the side of the car suggests a plant with strong branches:

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Salt-Lake-City/i-RvgFS9p/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: For Sale NEW L&N Shippers Guide

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

... And then, Brian, maybe not. I can make out the lettering on the end as “PAINT ALT. M 5 53”. Now, that looks like a paint date to me of May 1953. Any suggestion?

Bill Daniels
Santa Rosa, California


Re: Can anyone tell me anything about the "Safcar" running board and step?

Guy Wilber
 

Jack wrote:

“The correct name is "Safkar", made by the Irving Iron Works Co., Long Island City, NY. The open grid is formed by alternating straight and zigzag bars, all running longitudinally, riveted together, forming a distinctive pattern of trapezoidal openings.

Page in the '28 CBCyc shows use as passenger car step treads, mentioned being in use for 8 years. In the '31 Loco Cyc, they're shown as loco running boards and steps. Not found in the '40 CBCyc.”

Jack,

Irving Type AA Grating running boards were among the first approved by The AAR’s Committee on Safety Appliances when specifications for running boards other than wood (via Interchange Rule 3) took effect on January 1, 1944.

The ICC permitted the limited use of “experimental” running boards as early as 1932. The “Safkar” design may have been different than The Type AA Grating due to the specifications adopted in 1944.

By 1952 in addition to The Irving Type AA, another approved running board was listed as, The Irving Subway Grating Company’s Grating, R-BC. These were both applicable to house cars as well as covered hoppers. The Irving Subway Grating Company’s Grating, R-TC was listed for tank car running boards, dome steps and dome platforms.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: Shipping Fish

Drew Bunn
 

"Fresh fish" are a perishable, whereas "live fish" would be considered livestock. They need to be treated differently.  

CN ran fish in overnight passenger trains between Halifax and Boston utilizing Express Reefers with high speed trucks and steam lines. 

But I think fish are rarely shipped live.

On Fri., Jan. 3, 2020, 20:21 Ted Schnepf, <railsunl@...> wrote:
Hi Bob,

Fresh fish to me means, live fish shipped in aeration tanks, in baggage cars for the kosher trade.

For a refrigerator load, I assume you mean processed fish.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353


On Friday, January 3, 2020, 02:31:19 PM CST, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:


Shipping Fish

Where there any rules restricting refrigerator cars to fresh fish loads once they had been used to ship fresh fish?

Or did this depend on how the fist were packaged?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

20621 - 20640 of 189707