Date   

Bunker C unloading rack

Eric Hansmann
 

Pete Hall built an HO scale Bunker C unloading rack from a box of scrap parts. He shares his work in the latest Resin Car Works blog post.



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Cocoa Beach. Kits and loads.

 

Great report, Brian. Could you share a link to the 3D printed loads you ordered? Sounds interesting. Thx.
--
Ben Sullivan
Brookeville, MD
Modeling the Georgetown Branch of the B&O


Lumber On Sleds For Loading

Bob Chaparro
 

Lumber On Sleds For Loading

Photo Title: Loading Railroad Cars At Cloquet Lumber Company

http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/display?irn=10699359&return=brand%3Dcms%26q%3DLoading%2520railroad%2520cars

Click on "Display Larger Version" to see detail.

I was a bit surprised to see that the lumber arrived on sleds. Old timers have told me loading and unloading lumber from boxcars was a hard, dreary work. I imagine doping this in the dead of winter was even worse.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Cocoa Beach. Kits and loads.

Brian Carlson
 

Just got home from cocoa it was great catching up with old friends and making new ones.

There were some great models in the room and I am always interested in flat carloads. Eric Thur had some nice ones based on Bethlehem Steel loads that were 3-D printed. He provided the information to the designer and they are available on eBay And Shapeways. I ordered some during the show and they were delivered today before I got back from Cocoa.

I also like to visit hobby shops on the way to see what dusty kits may be lurking on shelves. I stopped at New Brookland Railroad & Hobby, 405 State St, West Columbia, SC 29169 and they had a nice selection of old and new stuff. If anyone is looking for kits they have a decent selection of Branchline and Proto 2000 lists mostly SE prototypes for those interested. He also had a bunch of Stewart loads. I picked up a Rapido meat reefer

Stewart Hobbies in willoughby Ohio has about 100 SF of branchline kits including 1/2 dozen NYC passenger cars.

Neither shop had them at fire sale prices.

Well, I have 6 loads to build. Maybe I’ll finish them by next year. I’m not as fast as Clark. Lol.
Brian J. Carlson


Re: Caboose restrictions

Rupert Gamlen
 

My thanks to all who responded to my query. The article that Charlie Vlk has provided seems to answer my questions. Just need to find copies of the legislation for the states in which the CB&Q operated.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

 


Re: Help with a SP box car

Bruce Smith
 

Tim,

National Scale Car is a new model company from Canada. http://nationalscalecar.com 
Lots of doors, tracks, details...
Ryan Menddell and his wife Samantha were at Cocoa Beach.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 5:11 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Help with a SP box car
 
Clark

National who ??

This is the B-50-20 represented by the IMWX (later Red Caboose) 1937 AAR box car. Many
cars by the late 1940's would have been relettered per the 1946 style with spelled out road name.

What is different about the NSC kit compared to the IMWX?


On 1/14/2020 2:34 PM, Clark Propst wrote:

At CCB (Great event had a wonderful time) I purchased a mini-kit from 'National Scale Car' for a SP box car, series 83420-83739. Kit basics are doors, lower tracks and decals. The only photo of a SP car in the instructions was taken later in life with larger roadname stenciling and lowered placards. I want to model the car for the late 40s, so I need to know the placement of the placard and route card board on the Superior door. Also there are three lettering choices on the decal sheet. Large roadname, smaller roadname for between the stripes above and below the roadname and number, and just initials for above the numbers between the stripes. These cars were built in 11-40. Which option would be appropriate?  From what photos I have I'm leaning towards just initials. I really need a photo showing the doors tho...I've got it ready for paint except for the doors.
CW Propst


Re: Photo: Staley Tank Cars

Bruce Smith
 

Um Tim,

That is a completely different car, both with respect to the under frame and the tank. The photo you posted appears to be a Pennsylvania Tank Car Company product. Careful examination would seem to indicate an original tank and under frame combination. Spotting features at the safety valves at opposite ends of the dome, 5 radial courses, and under frame with sills (which looks very much like a GATC product).

Regards,
Bruce 
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 6:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Staley Tank Cars
 

Has this one received a different underframe? It's 1966, 50 years after the build date.


On 1/13/2020 11:52 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:

AC&F Type 11, 10,000 gallon tank car. 

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Jan 13, 2020, at 10:43 AM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Staley Tank Cars

Undated photo from the Decatur Herald & Review:

https://tinyurl.com/taxs6pc

Attachments:

_


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: General Question ... Was - Re: UoK Permalinks

Bob Webber
 

Well pre 1929...a lot of factors. 

Car construction in the early 1900s wasn't robust enough for cars to stray and stay too far off systems.  Steel created some issues even as it helped others... Strength went up, but given early steel prod... Of both over and under building... Caused truck, bridge and rail issues.

While link and pin was on the way out and air brakes coming in, you had enough system issues that had to be worked out that cars stayed on system more.  Some rr systems weren't keen on sending cars they spent a lot on roving.

And.. One word.  Chicago.  While pigs infamously might have transitted without change of cars, many commodities still were transloaded in Chicago.  If they weren't used there.  Chicago was a huge vaccume that seemed to suck in everything.  A lot came from east and west but the concept of intercontinental transit was, though not foreign, not exactly common either.  Think about commodities.  Coal, iron, limestone, sand, gravel, wood, lumber, cotton, wool, etc. Were available on both coasts... Or at least both sides of the Chicago divide.  Given the weights involved, the western roads didn't need to Sent anything east... Yet.  Eastern finished goods did come west, but not yet vice versa.  Food was the one basic commodity that move west to east... But usually in blocks and didn't tary in yards along the way. 

While other gateways were important, none was swallowing as much from both directions.  Flour was one of the few refined products headed east... But the east had grain and got a lot through Lakers to Buffalo... Huge grain storage there to this day.   So, while some flour made it, usually broken down and transhipped.

Some lumber... Doug fir and redwood esp. Did make it east, but Chicago was growing fast... Swallowed trains of lumber.  Again, much that went further was broken down and transloaded. 

Remember... Before 1929, there were a series of financial embarrassments.   While less all encompassing than 1929, others were no less locally critical.  1893 killed many dreams and made many roads in the west vulnerable.  The titanic depression caused a ripple through railroads.  The immediate post ww1 economy was riddled with issues.  Add the pandemics and things didn't move as much as far. 

Start looking at what might be in those cars.  Just on those photos today.. Whiskey, cocoa, furniture, agriculture... None of that would go far west without transloading.  Thing return trips... Not a lot needed from the west pre 1940s.   Much of the traffic was simply 1 way... At least crossing the Chicago divide.

Sent from BlueMail

On Jan 14, 2020, at 4:45 PM, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:
Hi all,

  Bob's post with the UoK links prompts me to ask a general question about
freight car distribution.  This is not a criticism it is a request for enlightment.

  I have noticed that many of the photo links of earlier time frames - let's say
pre-WWII - that are taken at locations East of the Mississippi have 
relatively few cars in them from West Coast roads.  (I am not referring to
pics devoted to a single car/road but rather to pics of trains/yards with a
variety of cars in them.)  And then, after WW-II the West Coast roads 
start to show up in ever larger numbers as time passes.

  So my question is - was there a significant change in what products were
available, and where they were produced and where they were consumed
that caused this shift?
  If it wasn't the above ... what was the change?
  At least one answer is that most of the pics posted of East Coast trains
and yards are being posted (or linked) by members of this list who have
less interest in the West Coast.  I don't think that's true ... but it might be a
factor.  For example, the classic/oft referenced freight car distribution 
study was done using freight trains in Wyoming ... might/wouldn't that
study have changed if the location was "some where on the East Coast"?

                                                                                - Jim


Re: Help with a SP box car

Clark Propst
 

On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 03:10 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
What is different about the NSC kit compared to the IMWX?
This mini-kit has the correct superior doors and etched door tracks, decals for an SP car. I could take photo before painting? Will be out of town most of tomorrow, but should have it ready for paint Thursday. I used an Intermountain kit as a base.
This guy was at CL too. There he had mini-kits with ends for Canadian box cars. He only had door kit versions at CCB.
CW Propst


Re: Photo: Staley Tank Cars

Tim O'Connor
 


Has this one received a different underframe? It's 1966, 50 years after the build date.


On 1/13/2020 11:52 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:
AC&F Type 11, 10,000 gallon tank car. 

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Jan 13, 2020, at 10:43 AM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Staley Tank Cars

Undated photo from the Decatur Herald & Review:

https://tinyurl.com/taxs6pc

Attachments:

_


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: General Question ... Was - Re: UoK Permalinks

Dave Parker
 

My understanding, and I lack a primary reference, is that national "pooling" began in earnest during WWII due policies designed to enhance efficiency in war-time traffic.  [Pooling also took place briefly during the period of USRA control, and it was not popular among the railroads].  Thus, in the 1920s and 1930s (irrespective of the Depression), consists were very home-road heavy, and with a distinctly regional flavor (e.g., lots of PRR and NYC cars in New England, but very few SP or UP).  The late Tim Gilbert (of Gilbert-Nelson fame) documented this in some detail for his home road  -- the B&M.

If I had to guess, I would say that this regionality might have been more pronounced on the coasts, and less so on "bridge" roads in the middle of the country, but I don't recall seeing any data one way or the other.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Shorty automobile car - 1913

lrkdbn
 

Are you sure the photo isn't from Dagenham in England? Do the cars have buffers on the corners of the end?
Larry King


Re: Looking for any info about Linde (CCBX) gondolas #801-815 and the containers. #801-815

Tim O'Connor
 


Except at the prices, a load of calcium carbide containers runs about
$250 or so.

A bit out of my price range.

Some of the items do look much more practical.


On 1/14/2020 7:08 PM, Elliot Courtney via Groups.Io wrote:
Steel mill modelers supply is producing these containers, they can be found on facebook or at http://steelmillmodelerssupply.com 

Elliot Courtney 

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Kits/Cars for Sale

lrkdbn
 

I would like to see your list
Larry King <lrkdbn@...>


Re: Help with a SP box car

Tim O'Connor
 

On 1/14/2020 7:03 PM, Peter Hall wrote:


http://steamerafreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/protofrtcarsmain.html


Well, Tim, here’s one who hasn’t done that - can you share?

Thanks
Pete

On Jan 14, 2020, at 5:15 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


SP hardware options (doors, brakes, running boards) are listed in the Steam Era Freight Cars
spreadsheet compiled by Ted Culotta and Ed Hawkins. Every steam era modeler should have loaded
that onto their hard drive by now. :-)

Tim



On 1/14/2020 2:45 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

Clark Propst wrote:

At CCB (Great event had a wonderful time) I purchased a mini-kit from 'National Scale Car' for a SP box car, series 83420-83739. Kit basics are doors, lower tracks and decals. The only photo of a SP car in the instructions was taken later in life with larger roadname stenciling and lowered placards. I want to model the car for the late 40s, so I need to know the placement of the placard and route card board on the Superior door. Also there are three lettering choices on the decal sheet. Large roadname, smaller roadname for between the stripes above and below the roadname and number, and just initials for above the numbers between the stripes. These cars were built in 11-40. Which option would be appropriate?  From what photos I have I'm leaning towards just initials. I really need a photo showing the doors tho...I've got it ready for paint except for the doors.

   Clark, I will send you a photo off-list. When built, they would have had just initials inside the stripes, but by the 1950s would have been repainted, doubtless with the spelled-out road name, adopted in 1946. So for the late '40s you can choose which you like. The cars were built with steel running boards, so you need to include that. I can tell which car numbers had which running boards, if you like.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Looking for any info about Linde (CCBX) gondolas #801-815 and the containers. #801-815

Elliot Courtney
 

Steel mill modelers supply is producing these containers, they can be found on facebook or at http://steelmillmodelerssupply.com 

Elliot Courtney 


Re: UoK Permalinks

gary laakso
 

Bob, this car is a great find and by clicking on the picture and moving the picture around,  it appears that CNO&TP 1308, a ventilated boxcar is being repaired and between it and CNO&TP 1121, stringers are being prepared to build an underframe.

 


https://exploreuk.uky.edu/catalog/xt7sf7664q86_5878_1

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock




Behind the UTLX Dry bulk tank car

gary laakso
 

The picture really expands nicely clicking on the picture a couple of times.  With that done, there are good views of two L&N 36 foot boxcars and a very early covered hopper. 

 

https://exploreuk.uky.edu/catalog/xt702v2c8t1s_2661_1 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: Looking for any info about Linde (CCBX) gondolas #801-815 and the containers. #801-815

RICH CHAPIN
 

I believe the attached Patent this is the calcium carbide container in that Linde Flat Car.

The Linde Car is not a LCL drop side gon, although I can't say what type it is.

What's the date of the container flat photo?


Re: General Question ... Was - Re: UoK Permalinks

Tim O'Connor
 

1929 to 1941 photos show FEWER distant cars because fewer cars were
circulating due to the depression. By the same token, home road cars were
more common in those years. After the depression ended, box cars were more
thoroughly mixed up again.

On 1/14/2020 5:45 PM, Jim Betz wrote:
Hi all,

  Bob's post with the UoK links prompts me to ask a general question about
freight car distribution.  This is not a criticism it is a request for enlightment.

  I have noticed that many of the photo links of earlier time frames - let's say
pre-WWII - that are taken at locations East of the Mississippi have
relatively few cars in them from West Coast roads.  (I am not referring to
pics devoted to a single car/road but rather to pics of trains/yards with a
variety of cars in them.)  And then, after WW-II the West Coast roads
start to show up in ever larger numbers as time passes.

  So my question is - was there a significant change in what products were
available, and where they were produced and where they were consumed
that caused this shift?
  If it wasn't the above ... what was the change?
  At least one answer is that most of the pics posted of East Coast trains
and yards are being posted (or linked) by members of this list who have
less interest in the West Coast.  I don't think that's true ... but it might be a
factor.  For example, the classic/oft referenced freight car distribution
study was done using freight trains in Wyoming ... might/wouldn't that
study have changed if the location was "some where on the East Coast"?

                      - Jim
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

19301 - 19320 of 188581