Date   

Bx-34 Decals

John Barry
 

I failed to catch a layout error on the S&T decals.  The slogans for cars 140911 and 140317 are on the other cars sheet.  317 should be El Capitan and 911 should be Super Chief.

Limited additional decals are available for $5 for the twelve car numbers included in the project.  Each decal does one complete car and comes with reweigh dates to cover from New 1940 to 1953.  Repack and brake test decals are also provided along with a spare herald and data block.  Contact me directly at NorthBayLines at ATT dot NET.  

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


Re: Matching Colors

Jerome (Jerry) Albin
 

The technician is not matching paint colors. He is examining painted "Q-Panels" that have been cycled through a UV Weatherometer test machine and/or a salt spray cabinet. The tests accelerate fade and wear characteristics of paint samples.  Regards Jerry Albin


Shake N Take 2020 files uploaded to shake-n-take@groups.io

John Barry
 

Gents,

I have uploaded the presentation and copies of the Santa Fe Bx-34 drawings to the Shake_N_Take files.  

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Monday, January 20, 2020, 01:53:25 PM EST, shake-n-take@groups.io Notification <shake-n-take+notification@groups.io> wrote:


Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that the following files have been uploaded to the Files area of the shake-n-take@groups.io group.

Uploaded By: John Barry <northbaylines@...>

Description:
Presentation from the 2020 Bx-34 project

Cheers,
The Groups.io Team


Re: Branchline Blueprint 50-foot variations

Ed Hawkins
 



On Jan 20, 2020, at 7:12 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I need a reminder please regarding the Branchline Blueprint 50-foot boxcars in terms of the variations. I know they produced an 8-foot door car and an insulated car w/a sliding flush door. Note, I am not interested in the more modern cars they did, only the ones that would have the Improved Dreadnaught end variations.

Did they do a 9-foot door or any double door examples? Did the do any with a lower straight side sill?

Bill,
Branchline Trains (now Atlas) offered HO 50’ AAR box & auto car kits as follows with the side arrangement defined as riveted or welded & the number of side sheets to the left & right of the door opening, respectively.

1000-series: 8’ door openings, riveted 8/8 side sheets
1100-series: 15’ door openings, riveted 5/8 side sheets
1900-series: 9’ door openings, welded 8/8 side sheets
2000-series: 9’ door openings, riveted 8/8 side sheets

The above models came with three configurations of side sill to bolster, crosstie & door reinforcement connections that varied depending on the railroad. The three options of side sill connections were molded integral to the body.

a. Fish-belly from bolster to bolster
b. Straight from bolster to bolster
c. Separate bolster, crosstie & door reinforcement connections (i.e., “tabbed”)

While these three options were generally accurate for many prototype cars, others had straight side sill reinforcements extending from end to end (Northern Pacific one example) that Branchline did not offer & thus require modification by the modeler. 

Branchline also offered two versions of 50’ insulated box cars (RB/RBL).

1700-series: Sliding-flush doors for 8’ openings, riveted 8/8 side sheets
1800-series: Sliding-flush doors for 8’ openings, 4-panel riveted side sheets for 14 side posts & horizontal seams

The 1800-series models represented GARX prototype cars having Duryea underframes. However, the Branchline models came with the same conventional AAR underframe provided in other 50’ box car kits. Recall Jack Spencer’s RP CYC Volume 15 article on modifying one of these models with Duryea underframe.

Regards,
Ed Hawkins




Re: Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Lee Thwaits
 

In 40's & at least early 50's cans were hauled in bulk in stock cars from can co. ( in San Jose?) to Prattlow cannery in Santa Clara.  Cars were steam cleaned first then lined with heavy craft paper.
Lee Thwaits


Re: Photo: LV Boxcar 72286

Eric Hansmann
 

LV 80212 was part of the 80001-80400 series of 34-foot IL boxcars. Only 48 were listed in the October 1926 ORER.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bud Rindfleisch
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2020 8:28 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: LV Boxcar 72286

 

I have this photo a friend gave me a long time ago. An early version of the LV's "wrongway door" boxcar.

    Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Jim Betz
 

Hi,
  I worked in a salmon cannery in Anacortes, Wa. in the late 50's/early 60's.
We received box car loads of cans that were packed into very large
cardboard boxes that were on top of a pallet.  The dimensions of the 
box were the size of the pallet on the bottom and about 4 or 5 feet tall.
The pallets were loaded into the box cars with fork lifts and were stacked
two pallets high and pretty much filling the entire box car.  They were
moved to the can loft above and along one side of the cannery and 
stored in long lines on either side of a central aisle.  During canning
operations the pallets of cans were moved to a machine in the loft
and slid off the pallet from the fork lift.  I do not remember if the cans
were unloaded from the box bottom or top (tilted) by the machine -
but that machine fed the can line directly from the can loft to both
canning lines which were run to the actual canning machine and
rammed the salmon into the cans.  The movement of the cans was
done in long open "tubes" similar to current automated canning.  I
can probably find pics of the can loft part of the operation if needed.
                                                                                         - Jim 


Matching Colors

Bob Chaparro
 

Matching Colors

1942 photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017877998/

Caption "Laboratory worker at the research laboratory at the C & NW RR's [i.e. Chicago and North Western railroad's] 40th Street yard, examining paint samples used on freight cars and coaches of the railroad, Chicago, Ill."

For all you folks who lose sleep over getting the exact color match, here is your spiritual ancestor at work.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: LV Boxcar 72286

Bud Rindfleisch
 

I have this photo a friend gave me a long time ago. An early version of the LV's "wrongway door" boxcar.
    Bud Rindfleisch


Re: [RailwayBullShippersGroup] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Douglas Harding
 

Regarding the second photo of Richmond-Chase Company plant: I would speculate the SP stockcar was hauling fruit for unloading. Note it is not coupled to the boxcars that contain cans, indicating it was delivered separately.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: RailwayBullShippersGroup@groups.io [mailto:RailwayBullShippersGroup@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 11:52 AM
To: RailwayBullShippersGroup@groups.io
Subject: [RailwayBullShippersGroup] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

 

Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Circa 1920 photo of another use for a livestock car:

https://calisphere.org/item/6b72bf20ae08e9ac37dc6518e2fdb783/

Caption: "Workers from Richmond-Chase canning company unloading crates of fruit from railroad cars."

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

The car belongs to Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway, which I believe was a Southern Pacific subsidiary in Texas and Louisiana.

The car tag is almost readable and maybe reads "This car was ____ ____ and disinfected".

The Richmond-Chase Company became one of the primary fruit canning giants in Santa Clara County, CA. The company maintained four major packing and canning plants in San Jose, and had other agricultural operations in central California, as well as owning several orchards.

Plant, circa 1920:

http://digitalcollections.sjlibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/sjsurc/id/21

Shows several boxcars (at least one SP) apparently loaded with empty cans.

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

I can't determine if the SP livestock car has a load of cans.

Shipping ready-to-fill cans was not uncommon at one time:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017782124/

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Branchline Blueprint 50-foot variations

Bill Welch
 
Edited

I need a reminder please regarding the Branchline Blueprint 50-foot boxcars in terms of the variations. I know they produced an 8-foot door car and an insulated car w/a sliding flush door. Note, I am not interested in the more modern cars they did, only the ones that would have the Improved Dreadnaught end variations.

Did they do a 9-foot door or any double door examples? Did the do any with a lower straight side sill?

Thank you
Bill Welch


HO scale freight car kit news

Eric Hansmann
 

New resin kit models and new model kit companies are noted in the latest Resin Car Works blog post. 



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Cocoa Beach Photos

gtws00
 

Some great models on display. Looks like it was a good show.
Thanks for posting the photos
George Toman


Re: Help with a SP box car

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello Clark,
 
really nice looking model, no doubt, but please allow a question: -are you sure the brake rod orientation is correct? What I can see is an "ordinary" AB system, and the brake rods usually are oriented "diagonally" to each other, means the assembly at the B end is correct, but the brake rod at the A end would have to be placed to the other side of the lever.
Or am I missing something here?
 
Regards
 
Johannes
modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 15. Januar 2020 um 18:11 Uhr
Von: "Clark Propst" <cepropst@q.com>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Help with a SP box car
I didn't have to leave town this morning so I finished....Thought I'd finished, just remembered the cut lever...The SP mini-kit, I'll add the uncoupling lever and paint next.
I'm also attaching a model I did the week before CCB. It's an old Sunshine "Unibody" kit for a KCS rebuilt box car. I was expecting a yellow casting flat kit. To my surprise I got a C&BT kit with a couple of resin castings....I used the two castings and the carbody, the rest is from my parts stash.
CW Propst 


Re: Cocoa Beach Photos

Paul Doggett
 

Steve 

Thank you for sharing.

Paul Doggett.   England 


On 20 Jan 2020, at 03:16, Steve and Barb Hile <shile@...> wrote:


I have placed some photos from  Cocoa Beach 2020 in an album on Flickr at

https://www.flickr.com/photos/116454307@N06/albums/72157712745510706

Hopefully they are representative of the terrific variety seen there.  Thanks to all who shared their efforts in models, clinics and discussions.  We had a great time.

Enjoy,
Steve Hile


Cocoa Beach Photos

Steve and Barb Hile
 

I have placed some photos from  Cocoa Beach 2020 in an album on Flickr at

https://www.flickr.com/photos/116454307@N06/albums/72157712745510706

Hopefully they are representative of the terrific variety seen there.  Thanks to all who shared their efforts in models, clinics and discussions.  We had a great time.

Enjoy,
Steve Hile


Re: Looking for Jim Eager's EMail

Curt Fortenberry
 

In case no one replied.  He’s on the MFCL list and a few
others.  

Curt Fortenberry 


Re: Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Doug Paasch
 

Looking at the photo closer, it appears to be a heavy paper liner.

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Doug Paasch via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 4:00 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

 

Nice photos Bob.  Thanks for a great tidbit of info regarding an alternate use of stock cars.  Regarding shipping empty cans in stock cars, its seems unlikely but I’d never say never.  As you can see in the third photo where men are unloading cans from a box car, there is a heavy canvas (or something) liner in the box car to keep the cans clean.  I would think a stock car would be very difficult to keep clean from dust, if nothing else, even with a canvas liner (although I know they used stock cars for shipping grain in a pinch by lining them with plastic sheeting; however, grain is expected to contain a certain amount of dirt content).  My dad worked for Continental Can Company and told me that any contamination, like dirt or dust, was sufficient grounds for the consignee to reject the cans, so the can plant was VERY careful about keeping cans clean in shipment.  That’s why I doubt that stock cars were ever used, just because of the wind factor and the difficulty in keeping dirt/dust from blowing into the car.  But if anyone comes across a picture of a stock car, lined sufficiently to carry cans, I’d sure like to see it.

 

Doug Paasch

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 10:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

 

Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Circa 1920 photo of another use for a livestock car:

https://calisphere.org/item/6b72bf20ae08e9ac37dc6518e2fdb783/

Caption: "Workers from Richmond-Chase canning company unloading crates of fruit from railroad cars."

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

The car belongs to Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway, which I believe was a Southern Pacific subsidiary in Texas and Louisiana.

The car tag is almost readable and maybe reads "This car was ____ ____ and disinfected".

The Richmond-Chase Company became one of the primary fruit canning giants in Santa Clara County, CA. The company maintained four major packing and canning plants in San Jose, and had other agricultural operations in central California, as well as owning several orchards.

Plant, circa 1920:

http://digitalcollections.sjlibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/sjsurc/id/21

Shows several boxcars (at least one SP) apparently loaded with empty cans.

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

I can't determine if the SP livestock car has a load of cans.

Shipping ready-to-fill cans was not uncommon at one time:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017782124/

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: RF&F Sand Hopper

James McDonald
 

Thanks for the photos, Garth. Very interesting.

Yes, David is correct. The RF&P’s small fleet of sand hoppers were used for transporting locomotive sand between the Kyanite source mine in Dillwyn, Va. to loco facilities at Acca and Potomac Yards.

The initial donor cars for the RF&P’s fleet of sand hoppers were taken seemingly at random from the line's pool of two bay open hoppers. Initially the series consisted of RFP 7001-7004, formerly cars RFP 3573, and RFP 3576-3578, which were outside post hoppers.

In 1972, as David said, the RF&P bought a series of offset 2 bay hoppers from the B&LE. Originally built in October of 1942, these cars were rehabbed by Ortner before sale to the RF&P. Six of them were taken to be rebuilt into covered hoppers. The ex-BLE cars were numbered 7001-7070* and sand hopper fleet was renumbered RFP 11 to 18.

It’s interesting that this car still rides on solid bearing trucks at this date. The RF&P began converting these cars to roller bearing trucks earlier in the 1970s using ones that came off of scrapped boxcars. Consequently, many of these sand hoppers wound up with the unusual configuration of black bodies with blue trucks.

All the best,

James
=-=-=
James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD.

* The series appears to have been numbered up to 7070, although it’s not clear the entire range was ever occupied. Different RF&P internal documents refer to different quantities.


Re: Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Doug Paasch
 

Nice photos Bob.  Thanks for a great tidbit of info regarding an alternate use of stock cars.  Regarding shipping empty cans in stock cars, its seems unlikely but I’d never say never.  As you can see in the third photo where men are unloading cans from a box car, there is a heavy canvas (or something) liner in the box car to keep the cans clean.  I would think a stock car would be very difficult to keep clean from dust, if nothing else, even with a canvas liner (although I know they used stock cars for shipping grain in a pinch by lining them with plastic sheeting; however, grain is expected to contain a certain amount of dirt content).  My dad worked for Continental Can Company and told me that any contamination, like dirt or dust, was sufficient grounds for the consignee to reject the cans, so the can plant was VERY careful about keeping cans clean in shipment.  That’s why I doubt that stock cars were ever used, just because of the wind factor and the difficulty in keeping dirt/dust from blowing into the car.  But if anyone comes across a picture of a stock car, lined sufficiently to carry cans, I’d sure like to see it.

 

Doug Paasch

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 10:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

 

Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Circa 1920 photo of another use for a livestock car:

https://calisphere.org/item/6b72bf20ae08e9ac37dc6518e2fdb783/

Caption: "Workers from Richmond-Chase canning company unloading crates of fruit from railroad cars."

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

The car belongs to Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway, which I believe was a Southern Pacific subsidiary in Texas and Louisiana.

The car tag is almost readable and maybe reads "This car was ____ ____ and disinfected".

The Richmond-Chase Company became one of the primary fruit canning giants in Santa Clara County, CA. The company maintained four major packing and canning plants in San Jose, and had other agricultural operations in central California, as well as owning several orchards.

Plant, circa 1920:

http://digitalcollections.sjlibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/sjsurc/id/21

Shows several boxcars (at least one SP) apparently loaded with empty cans.

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

I can't determine if the SP livestock car has a load of cans.

Shipping ready-to-fill cans was not uncommon at one time:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017782124/

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup