Date   

Re: Vague question about a gondola

Clark Propst
 

On Mon, Feb 3, 2020 at 07:12 PM, Rick Jesionowski wrote:
I checked my C&NW Color Guide and in the 1970’s they picked up both the Betlehem (from C&EI and PC) and the ACF car from the PC.

Rick Jesionowski
Thanks Rick, I lent him my book. He's going to do the car as received from PC.
CW Propst


Southwest Scale Productions

StephenK
 

I am looking for a set of SSP doors that are described on the website as: Superior 6 Ft Wide 10' 6" IH 7 Panel Door Wide 3rd Panel.  I sent a note to the website just to check that it would fit my Branchline kit, but never got an answer.    Is Southwest Scale Productions still in business?    I would like that door for a Texas and Pacific boxcar I am doing and would like to give the business to a small producer, but I don't want to send away $$ for nothing.

Steve Kay


Re: ACL low sided gondolas

Paul Doggett
 

Hi Thomas 

Thank you for the information.

Paul 


On 5 Feb 2020, at 15:24, thomas christensen via Groups.Io <thomasjonly@...> wrote:


Paul, 
 Class K-7 90950-93199, blt 1926 by ACF.
 Attached are the Lines South article from Spring 1990, 2 Larry Goolsby photos, and photos  of models I did about 25 years ago based on the Ertl model.
Tom Christensen 






















Hi

I have just started a Funaro and Camerlengo ACL low sided gondola as usual there is no photographs of the prototype and the drawing is poor has anyone got any photos of these cars in service the only number given is 92250 .

Thank you in advance
Paul Doggett    

Attachments:


Source for Intermountain Parts

golden1014
 

Hi Gents,

I’m in need of about 4-5 pair of Intermountain 1937 Modified 10-6 Youngstown box car doors for a project, and a few 1937 Modified (preferably undec) box car kits.  Can anyone recommend a dealer that can talk the talk?

I contacted Andy Carlson but he’s unable to help with this one.

Thanks,
John Golden


Re: Grandt Line part

Christopher J. Palermo <cpalermo@...>
 

I have a package of 5167 with two door latches in it, thus enough for one car. The other two I used in a project. If this works, let me know where to mail it.

I also have 5168.

Chris Palermo
San Carlos, CA


Re: ACL low sided gondolas

thomas christensen
 

Paul, 
 Class K-7 90950-93199, blt 1926 by ACF.
 Attached are the Lines South article from Spring 1990, 2 Larry Goolsby photos, and photos  of models I did about 25 years ago based on the Ertl model.
Tom Christensen 






















Hi

I have just started a Funaro and Camerlengo ACL low sided gondola as usual there is no photographs of the prototype and the drawing is poor has anyone got any photos of these cars in service the only number given is 92250 .

Thank you in advance
Paul Doggett    


Re: Grandt Line part

Mark
 

Pierre, Are you sure about the number? Or, do you mean 5106?

Mark Feddersen

Denver, Iowa

On 1/29/2020 3:34 PM, Pierre Oliver wrote:
Anybody out there have a spare set of Grandt Line #5167 reefer door latch hardware, they be willing to part with?


Re: Grandt Line - San Juan - American Limited - etc

Calvin Monaghan
 

I placed an order for some Grandt Line parts from San Juan in August. I didn’t receive any response for about a month- but when I did it was to tell me that my order was ready and to send payment.

I sent payment and the parts came a couple weeks later. Slow communication, but I eventually got what I ordered.

--
Calvin Monaghan
Charlottetown, PE Canada


Re: Car End Data

earlyrail
 

Lettering on trucks goes way back.
I have photos of in service cars from 1905 that show car number and journal size lettered on the trucks.
And yes, my models have all this lettering.

Howard Garner


Re: Merchants Despatch Refrigerator Car Wreck - Lehigh Valley

Dave Parker
 

All of the MDT's SUF cars built between 1911 and 1917 (~3700 by my count) had 5-ft wide doors with four hinges per side.  Cars built after the war had 4-ft doors and the more typical three hinges per side.

The pre-war cars were all rebuilt with the 1920+ door configuration during the 1920s; none of the original wider doors remain in my December, 1930, ORER.

So, their rarity is very much a function of what year one is considering.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Merchants Despatch Refrigerator Car Wreck - Lehigh Valley

Bob Chaparro
 

Also interesting is the pair of four-hinge doors on the MDT reefer. Not rare but maybe less common than three-hinge doors?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: NKP BOXCAR COLORS

Vera Mills
 

Hello,

Further to Craig's comments below, please find attached a photograph taken on 3 July 2005 of NKP 8099 at ITM Noblesville IN.

It looks like a black end to me.

Regards,

Glen Mills
Re: NKP BOXCAR COLORS
From: c.presler
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2020 19:11:50 PST

When 8099 arrived at ITM the ends and underframe were black with the roof the same as the sides. That is how I repainted it. It had been parked at the Noblesville grain elevator at their request to hold supplies for grain doors. When we asked the office at Frankfort to move it, they were skeptical because their indicated their records showed it had been scrapped. I had to hand deliver a photo of the car with my '84 Camaro parked in front of it.

snip.....

Craig Presler
Noblesville


Re: Car End Data

Gary Ray
 

Hi Eric,

 

Thanks for posting.  I’m literally taking a break from construction of 3 Westerfield USRA boxcars today.  What a wonderful surprise and helpful info on the car ends.

Thanks,

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Tuesday, February 4, 2020 6:14 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Car End Data

 

Those of us modeling the real steam era are well aware of the car end data stencils. It seemed to be popular on several batches of USRA boxcars.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/34451275534/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/34485142103/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/34451207284/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/35128471512/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/35128465652/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/34689997732/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

These are soooo much fuuuuun to decal….

 

I prefer the hardware inventory on the car sides.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/34485282793/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

The decals are much easier to apply on the flat surfaces.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2019/09/16/gloss-coat-and-rpms/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 


Merchants Despatch Refrigerator Car Wreck - Lehigh Valley

Richard Wilkens
 

Was looking on ebay and came across this postcard of a Merchants Despatch car in a wreck. Interesting the different trucks on the ground to the left.

Rich Wilkens


Re: Car End Data

Bob Webber
 

Ron, in all the stenciling drawings, they show the stenciling on the bolsters & ends.  And, either casting data/RR marks & #s or painted info on wheels and/or side frames (dependingo n the regs at that moment in time).  

At 07:51 AM 2/4/2020, you wrote:
But in the steam era or a few years after, I don't recall ever seeing the car number stenciled on the outside of the truck frame.  I agree it was sometimes stenciled on at least one side of the bolster, but I'm not sure even how common that was.

Ron Merrick
_._,_._,_

Bob Webber


Re: Car End Data

Bob Webber
 

The normal stencil drawing for freight cars as built by P-S, SSC and others show that there were a multitude of stencils.

The truck bolsters (with car #)
The car ends (multiple lines)
the center sill
ownership plates
trust plates
brake lever indicators
handle instructions
cast letters on truck side frames picked out with white
adjust brakes here
brake cylinder data
defect card
paint info
builders badge
brake shaft end painted
etc.

On most of the stenciling drawings we have (and we have a lot scanned because, I always thought they'd be of interest so I pulled and scanned any I saw) they have all this and more.  Then there are the more detailed drawings for the various plates, smaller stencils, etc.  Plus the stencils inside the car that, depending on how it's staged, can be seen.  The end of the car data (which started all this) is seen on every drawing.

Note though that these are AS BUILT.  Fresh from the paint shop.  What another shop might do afterwards, how grime and other weathering affect that is another story.

As Ted mentioned - you have to be able to match parts in case of accidents, wrecks, misadventures, shopping, etc.  When an off-road shop had to replace trucks or wheels, the original casting #s had to be noted in the reports back to the owner, along with the new (if so ordered). 

That's partially why the sill number & marks are there - why hatch covers get interior lettering, why interior doors get lettering, etc. 

Bob Webber


Re: Car End Data

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Feb 3, 2020 at 08:10 PM, Jack Mullen wrote:
As several posters have noted, the practice of stencilling data on car ends didn't end after the requirement was dropped, but the content changed over time.
While the WWI era stenciling that Eric linked to seems like an advertisement for the builder, kind of like the option list on a car dealer's window sticker, it eventually evolved to include only those items that were truly useful, mostly to the RIP track foremen. When a car showed up on the RIP track, and it could well be a foreign road car, the first thing the foreman had to decide was whether to assign someone to repair it, or hold it while parts were ordered. Having information like spring size and class stenciled on the car meant he didn't have to have someone disassemble it, only to have to stop until the required parts came in. The stenciling avoided wasted time, and kept his facility fluid; a bad order car can typically still be switched, unless it's up on jacks.

As to reporting marks on the truck bolster and sill, as far as I know that was always an MCB/ARA/AAR recommendation; doors too. Basically any part of the car that was likely to come loose on the repair track, or in a wreck. It greatly aided getting all the parts back together. If one doesn't see the stenciling on the bolster, it's likely there, but covered with dirt.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Car End Data

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

I believe lettering on truck bolsters to be very common.  One big reason.  When cars derail, you need to match trucks to each car.

I remember investigating derailments in the 1970's and all trucks had car numbers, and matching trucks to cars, trying to determine the cause of the pileup.

I assume my predecessors 20 years earlier were doing the same thing at derailments.

retired railroad civil engineer.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353


On Tuesday, February 4, 2020, 07:51:29 AM CST, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:


Stenciling the reporting marks and number on the center sill is pretty visible on tank cars, and that data is almost always included in the tank car decals I've seen.  But I also recall it as being really useful when cars were downgraded to work service.  The original number often remained undisturbed in that case, so it was a great way to track where a car came from.  Too bad I didn't record more of those....

But in the steam era or a few years after, I don't recall ever seeing the car number stenciled on the outside of the truck frame.  I agree it was sometimes stenciled on at least one side of the bolster, but I'm not sure even how common that was.

Ron Merrick
_._,_._,_


Re: Car End Data

Eric Hansmann
 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of np328
Sent: Monday, February 3, 2020 5:58 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Car End Data

 

As with Dick Harley, late in commenting. I took a broad look over some photos I have collected over time. And uploaded some below. 

Of these photos there is consistency (with the NP shop procedures) that not only the ends had data painted however even the truck bolsters can be seen in some of the photos having the car number painted on. To those who might talk of wheel bearings throwing oil out and obscuring the stenciling, the lettering is on the inside of the wheels where most of the spray might not land.

Will I be lettering the truck bolsters on all my NP cars? Decals in the correct sizing would be a challenge to find, so perhaps I will do a few resin kits.

On the prototype which should be the basis to study, there it was.

Notes:
NP 24798 - note on the truck bolster car number is clearly visible on this 1947 Laurel, MT kit-built car. (The shops assembled parts like doors and ends from builders, however crafted the sides and did the assembly.)
NP Covered hopper 75040, built 1951 at the NP Brainerd, MN shops. 
NP 84000 - yes the roof, ends, and even the coupler box is covered with aluminum paint, which makes the end data pretty visible. Cars were listed in the Mech. spec sheets as having aluminum paint to protect pigs from excessive heat. (Sides, trucks, underframe - BCR.)  In addition they had counter-balanced shutters that could be moved to enclose the car entirely in the winter climate local to the NP.  These cars were original NP 8000 series XMs of 1929 and rebuilt into this car in the photo in 1958. Roller bearings and snubbers on the trucks for a smooth ride. 
3309 Built 1-1960, so it barely fits in here with respect to this lists time frame.  End data is there. 

I have other photos from well beyond this lists time frame that shows on the NP, this practice continued. 

Last image - I am not sure if I posted this image prior. It is a response to a question from Lester Breuer that I may or may not have answered. The time frame covered by the letter affects the dates of some who model this and earlier eras here and so I will include it.

To sum up, the words of Garth Groff on check your photos seems to be the way to go.                                  Jim Dick - Roseville, MN 
  


Re: Car End Data

mopacfirst
 

Stenciling the reporting marks and number on the center sill is pretty visible on tank cars, and that data is almost always included in the tank car decals I've seen.  But I also recall it as being really useful when cars were downgraded to work service.  The original number often remained undisturbed in that case, so it was a great way to track where a car came from.  Too bad I didn't record more of those....

But in the steam era or a few years after, I don't recall ever seeing the car number stenciled on the outside of the truck frame.  I agree it was sometimes stenciled on at least one side of the bolster, but I'm not sure even how common that was.

Ron Merrick