Date   

Offered: Sunshine Resin SP B-50-24 Black Overnight lettering box car kit

Andy Carlson
 


Hello- Something to do while we are waiting on an uncertain future.

Offering for sale; I have a new, never removed from box HO Sunshine Models kit #32.1 S.P. B-50-24 Black Overnight lettering 40' box car kit.

Offered for $55 and I pay shipping. It will be Kraft wrapped before mailing. Has the unique for SP Youngstown Steel "Overnight" steel door.

I accept checks and money orders. With a small fee PayPal is welcomed. Contact me off-list (Please) for details at <midcentury@...>
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson, Ojai, CA.


Looking for Sunshine 22.6 kit: CB&Q XA-7

Fred Jansz
 

Hello all,

modeling WP's Quincy Junction in 1:87.
Would love to add the car pictured to the scene: a CB&Q XA-7 (I suppose).
Who can help me with a Sunshine #22.6 kit?
Top picture from the SEFC site shows the car in Q built by Bill Welch, photo by Ted Culotta.
Bottom pic by Guy Dunscomb.

Thanks & best regards from Holland,
Fred Jansz, fred@...


FS: InterMountain Santa Fe (SFRD) Reefers, RTR and Kits (HO)

Joseph Melhorn
 

It’s time to thin down my collection of rolling stock. I've attached a PDF of some Intermountain Santa Fe (SFRD) Reefer Cars. They include RR-21, 23, 27, 28 and 32 Class, with dates ranging from  6/37 to 11/48, many different logos and all have unique road numbers. There are factory RTR and Kits. Pricing per car/kit is: RTR - $24.00/ea., Kit - $12.00/ea. and also indicated in the PDF. There are two partially built kits (Lot 3) - $8.00/ea. as is (Note - some of the stirrup steps have broken loose). All of these cars are out of production. Shipping from 85629 is extra. I will ship the most economical way. Please reply off-list to: toyman@... with your wants.

Thanks,

Joe Melhorn

Sahuarita, AZ  85629

 

 


Re: Early Fruit Transportation

Tony Thompson
 

Howard Garner wrote:

Great book. I have a copy somewhere.
But the authors last name is WELD.  He has those 3 given names.

    Thanks for this, Howard. I realized I forgot to make this correction in my comment. Weld's book is of course cited in my bibliography for PFE Chapter 3. 

Tony Thompson




Re: Early Fruit Transportation

earlyrail
 

Great book. I have a copy somewhere.
But the authors last name is WELD.  He has those 3 given names.
Howard Garner


Re: Early Fruit Transportation . . . . . oyster box cars

al.kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

Circa 1880, the ministers in the C&O Richmond-to-Newport News area were complaining about iced oyster cars going to Cincinnati.  Reason being, they came back filled with beer and those fast trains had to be crewed seven days a week including Sundays.  They wanted all crews back home, and sober, with their families on Sunday mornings.

Al Kresse


Re: Early Fruit Transportation

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Early Fruit Transportation

From the 1908 book, Private Freight Cars And American Railways by

Louis Dwight Harvell:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo1.ark:/13960/t60584r0q&view=1up&seq=9


    Tin the early part of the 20th century, there was considerable controversy about private freight cars, and this book is one of many. The citation quoted by Bob is typical of many early writers, who believe what they saw in publicity releases or promotional materials. In fact, fruit was shipped from the west coast almost as soon as the transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, and refrigerator cars (and ventilated fruit cars) were very much in existence at the time.  (See John White's book.) Design of such cars did improve in the following decades, and any number of inventors claimed that THEIR car was the basis of fruit transportation.
     Much of this history was included in Chapter 3 of the PFE book. I digested a considerable amount of history, as documented in the bibliography of the PFE book, and used it in writing that chapter.

Tony Thompson




Re: Paint stripper saga

Allan Smith
 

NKP 18000 Series Boxcars. See Mont Switzer article in Mainline Modeler March 1994 Page 28-29. The NKP Rebuilt some 16000-17999 cars and renumbered them into the 18000 series. I am not an expert in the NKP, but am building NKP cars for my layout, from conductors lists from the Sierra RR in 1954.

Al Smith
Sonora CA

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 10:47:38 AM PDT, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:


I only mention this because this subject seems to come up alot. Yesterday I decided to build four plastic kits as a change of pace from drilling and pushing in grab irons on resin models. I have three IMWX and one Intermountain AAR 37 design kits to make home road. I had stripped the lettering off the IM kit previously. I thought the IMWX kits were all undecs, but one was lettered NKP. I use Scalecoat stripper. I dipped the car in for about a half hour. Didn't touch the lettering. I did one more dip, no success. I thought, well, I'll leave it NKP. The car was numbered in the 18000 series. I checked Ed Hawkins AAR 37 list and found no cars listed in that series. So, I dipped the body in the stripper for several hours. Finally with scrubbing it came off. They used good paint in the old days  ;  ))
CW Propst


Paint stripper saga

Clark Propst
 

I only mention this because this subject seems to come up alot. Yesterday I decided to build four plastic kits as a change of pace from drilling and pushing in grab irons on resin models. I have three IMWX and one Intermountain AAR 37 design kits to make home road. I had stripped the lettering off the IM kit previously. I thought the IMWX kits were all undecs, but one was lettered NKP. I use Scalecoat stripper. I dipped the car in for about a half hour. Didn't touch the lettering. I did one more dip, no success. I thought, well, I'll leave it NKP. The car was numbered in the 18000 series. I checked Ed Hawkins AAR 37 list and found no cars listed in that series. So, I dipped the body in the stripper for several hours. Finally with scrubbing it came off. They used good paint in the old days  ;  ))
CW Propst


PRR Class X36 (was Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: CP Boxcar 24000)

Benjamin Hom
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
Interesting!  A bit earlier than the PRR's Class X36 103500, their 9/25/1936 example of an outside post boxcar, well before these became popular!
 
http://prr.railfan.net/photos/BuildersPhotos/X36_E10514_A34_BillLane.jpg 

(photo posted to Rob Schoenberg's page, from the collection of Bill Lane)


Schuyler Larrabee asked:
"Was this a class of cars, or a one-off?"

Both.  Class X36, single car built 9-36.


Ben Hom


Re: Early Fruit Transportation

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Mar 29, 2020, at 09:40, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Early Fruit Transportation

From the 1908 book, Private Freight Cars And American Railways by
It's also at Giggle[sic] Books: <https://books.google.com/books?id=0e9AAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Private+Freight+Cars+And+American+Railways&hl=en&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjR6a_zm8DoAhUOT6wKHWe4D1MQ6AEwAHoECAYQAg#v=onepage&q=Private%20Freight%20Cars%20And%20American%20Railways&f=false>
--
"Honor is a mere scutcheon."
John Falstaff, Henry IV Part 1
V.i.129–139


Re: Photo: CP Boxcar 24000

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Was this a class of cars, or a one-off?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2020 10:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: CP Boxcar 24000

 

Interesting!  A bit earlier than the PRR's class X36 103500, their 9/25/1936 example of an outside post boxcar, well before these became popular!

 

(photo posted to Rob Schoewnberg's page, from the collection of Bill Lane)

 

Regards,

Bruce 

Bruce Smith

Auburn, Al

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2020 6:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: CP Boxcar 24000

 

Photo: CP Boxcar 24000

Courtesy of Model Railroader, an early vertical rib boxcar:

https://hosting.photobucket.com/albums/b399/doctorwayne/Scanned%20foe-toes/Copy%20of%20CPR%20BOXCAR007.jpg

No information provided to accompany the photo.

Experimental car or put into service in meaningful numbers?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: vertical ribbed box car ends (was [RealSTMFC] Some Good Photos of Wrecks with Freight Cars in them)

Brent Greer
 

I was told that the 8-8 vertical ribs were from Murphy, and that a 7-7 inverted vertical rib was also offered by Vulcan.

Brent


Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 10:03 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: vertical ribbed box car ends (was [RealSTMFC] Some Good Photos of Wrecks with Freight Cars in them)
 

Reminds me of this end - Did anyone ever identify who made the ends with vertical ribs?

http://www.fritzmilhaupt.com/bbgraphics/85500EndSm.jpg


==============================

On 3/28/2020 4:39 PM, brianleppert@... wrote:

I think photo is attached.

Brian

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Early Fruit Transportation

Bob Chaparro
 

Early Fruit Transportation

From the 1908 book, Private Freight Cars And American Railways by

Louis Dwight Harvell:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo1.ark:/13960/t60584r0q&view=1up&seq=9

Most of what is discussed below predates Pacific Fruit Express (formed in 1906) and the Santa Fe Fruit & Refrigerator Line (formed in 1892.)

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

++++ 

The first refrigerator line of any importance operated solely for the fruit traffic was that of F. A. Thomas, a fruit and produce dealer of South Water Street, Chicago. His line was started in the following way. A Detroit inventor named Carlton B. Hutchins perfected a refrigerator car in 1886, had fifty of them built, organized the Detroit Refrigerator Car Company, and operated them over the

Michigan Central in the fruit and produce trade.

Owing to a personal disagreement with the president of the road, Mr. Hutchins was obliged to cease operating his cars over the Michigan Central, and went to Chicago in search of some one who would use them. There he found Mr. Thomas and his son, who took them, and operated them in traffic to the East.

In a few months Mr. Thomas prevailed upon the roads running to the Pacific coast to let him send five cars to California to test carrying fruit from there to

Chicago. The fruit growers were skeptical and would not allow their fruit to be shipped in these cars, so the Thomas firm had to buy the fruit with which to load them. The experiment was successful, and the possibilities in the development

of this traffic were immediately realized. This was in 1888.

Soon the Thomases, together with Mr. Hutchins, formed the California Fruit Transportation Company, (known as the C. F. T.), which rented cars of the Hutchins Refrigerator Car Company, a corporation which had been formed for the purpose of building and owning the cars, for $8.33 a month each. This company operated for a couple of years at enormous profits and its success allured others into the field.

Soon the Goodell Line, owned by Porter Brothers, began in the California trade, and then came the Continental Fruit Express (known as the C. F. X.), owned by Mr. Edwin T. Earl.

It was about this time (1890), that Armour became interested in the fruit traffic,

and it is alleged that Earl got his first refrigerators from him. At any rate, there soon ensued a fierce competition for the traffic, and cut rates and rebates were granted indiscriminately.

Armour became allied with Porter Brothers, and later absorbed that company. The relations between Armour and this company were investigated in the

Interstate Commerce Commission hearing of October, 1904.

The cutting of rates was carried to such an extent that the Thomas Company became embarrassed, and after a few futile efforts to maintain its business, it was forced to the wall. The C. F. T. was later absorbed by Swift, and is

now one of the lines operated by him.

Not long after this, the Earl Company, C. F. X., was bought out by Armour at

a high price, for this company had increased its equipment and business and had not been driven to the wall under the stress of competition.

After this, the fruits of California were carried mainly in Armour cars, until late in the nineties when the Santa Fe began to build an adequate supply of refrigerators.

As stated above, it was not until about 1890 that Armour became interested in the fruit traffic. Previous to that time his refrigerator-car equipment was used only in hauling  dressed meats. He began by building 1000 cars for the carriage of fruits and vegetables, and sent men into the fruit-growing sections of the country to demonstrate the practicability of his cars and to solicit business.

The traffic developed, and he soon built another thousand cars. By building its own cars, and by acquiring the cars of other companies, the Armour Car Lines soon became the most powerful company in the business.

The equipment of some fifteen to twenty different concerns, some of them very

small, have been purchased by the Armour Company from first to last, but they now operate principally under the following names: Armour Car Lines (in the meat traffic), Fruit Growers' Express, and the Continental Fruit Express.


Re: Breakdown of Dan Hall’s Southwest Scale Productions Door Parts w/Link

Bill Welch
 

Apologies to Tim for misspelling his last name. I have corrected it in my Documents and will repost if I find a reason to revise the document.

Bill Welch


Breakdown of Dan Hall’s Southwest Scale Productions Door Parts w/Link

pennsylvania1954
 

Tim and Bill--Well done, gents. Very much appreciated. Thanks!
--
Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: vertical ribbed box car ends (was [RealSTMFC] Some Good Photos of Wrecks with Freight Cars in them)

Tim O'Connor
 


Reminds me of this end - Did anyone ever identify who made the ends with vertical ribs?

http://www.fritzmilhaupt.com/bbgraphics/85500EndSm.jpg


==============================

On 3/28/2020 4:39 PM, brianleppert@... wrote:
I think photo is attached.

Brian

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: [ResinFreightCarBuilders] Tim O'Conner's Breakdown of Dan Hall’s Southwest Scale Productions Door Parts w/Link

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill,

All okay with me, but I'm not sure I like to have a post in the archives with
the subject that begins with "Tim O'Conner's [sic] Breakdown..." :-D

Tim O'


On 3/28/2020 8:34 PM, Bill Welch wrote:

I have taken Tim O'Conner's VERY helpful post here today and re-organized it a bit—hope this okay with you Tim—and put in both a Word doc (so you can make your own notes on it) and as a PDF in case for some reason you cannot open  a Word doc.

Thank you Tim!!!

Bill Welch

 

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: RPM Chicagoland News

skibbs4
 

While the Sheraton did try to move us to a Wed-Fri program schedule, the issue was the costs didn’t go down. We have a lot of walk in traffic from locals on Saturday, a day we offer a one day rate for those folks who couldn’t get off work during the week. It helped balance the bills enough that we weren’t comfortable losing out on that bit of revenue. If the show continued in its “Big Format”. 

I applaud Frank’s willingness to shift this event a bit. A small format is a good thing this year. And let’s see what 2021 brings. I hope everything bounces back. 

I do know that I’m finding a lot of time to work on models all of the sudden. Make sure you support your local hobby shops. And or Des Plaines Hobbies who are still doing mail order!

Mike Skibbe
www.rpmconference.com

On Mar 29, 2020, at 2:29 AM, Bob Chapman <chapbob611@...> wrote:


Tom Madden writes:
"The Sheraton - Lisle would rather do weddings on Saturdays than conventions so they've priced themselves out of range for meets like ours."


The 1+ day meet arrangements at NIU for 2020 make perfect sense, given the overall situation. But if the hotel situation described by Tom continues into 2021, I have to wonder whether Chicagoland might be nearly as successful with a full 2 1/2 day mid-week convention vs the scaled-down weekend version. Many of the attendees are retirees where "every day is a Saturday," and the sampling of younger attendees I have met seem committed enough RPMers to consider scheduling vacation time. Mid-week weddings would be less of an issue; mid-week competition for the convention space and room availability vs. weekday business travel would have to be checked out with the hotel.

No question we would lose some folks with mid-week timing, but if things look encouraging from the hotel, there might be interesting insight if Frank were to poll the registrants and dealers from 2019 with this question. And to put us back on topic for realSTMFC -- more time for freight car clinics and discussion!

Regards,
Bob Chapman


Re: Western Fruit Express 12' 11" rebuilt reefer.

Bill Welch
 

Scott the 12' 11" measurement refers to these FGE and WFE rebuilds height from the top of the rail to the roof eave of the car. FGE and WFE began rebuilding their prewar built wood sheathed cars in 1948 applying a taller steel braced superstructure.

Bill Welch

23701 - 23720 of 194713