Date   

Re: Accurail kit 4498

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Mar 30, 2020 at 03:03 PM, lsittler wrote:
Can you tell me what CN car number series this model is intended to represent?  Also, if you know of any prototype information that’s available I would be grateful. Same goes for decals. Secondly, I was fortunate enough to buy one of your CN 1917 boxcar resin kits. The resin castings are truly wonderful but since this is an older kit the instructions are somewhat inscrutable to me. Since I model 1961 I am interested in the later version of this car. I realize I will need to utilize an AB brake system. No diagram is provided. However, the instructions state that later “cast steel AAR style trucks” were used- do you know what trucks are intended by this language? Also, it is stated that “a length of old rail (later stated to be code 40) was fitted to the center of each end to add a fifth post”.  I am not clear what that means. I take it that these cars were numbered in the 500,000 series on CN. The decals look somewhat beaten up in my kit.  Any new ones available?

Wow, where to start? Decals... you do realize that I sold the resin kit line, what, 33 years ago, right? And, I'm not a CNR modeler, so I have no idea what is available in CNR decals today. Give the decals a try. They were printed by Rail Graphics (now out of business) who always did quality work.

I'll leave the AB brake questions to someone else, as I never researched it.

A really good, but somewhat confusing (because the CNR roster is so large) resource is Ian Cranstone's web site at http://www.nakina.net/cn/cn.html  I don't have a lot of data at my finger tips, but going strictly by the built dates, by memory:

The 1916-1917 built Canadian Government Railway cars became CNR 500000-500492 in 1923, and you should be able to follow them through the roster from there. Ian doesn't include the inside width dimension, but note these cars have a distinctive 3265 cu.ft. capacity because they are 9'-0" wide. These were BIG cars for the day.

The Accurail 4000/4100 series kits are based on the CNR cars built in 1923, '24, and I believe 1927, all 3098 cu.ft. capacity because IIRC they are 8'-9" IW. That would put them in number series 500500-503499 when built

The Accurail 4200/4300 kits model the 9' IH automobile cars built in 1923 as CNR 580000-580999, also 3098 cu.ft, after they were rebuilt with 6' doors in 1933 and renumbered 464000-464999, but they also may have been the ex Grand Trunk Railway cars built in 1921 and renumbered  in the series just below; I really don't recall which group had the steel ends.

I welcome any additions or corrections to this.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Accurail kit 4498

lsittler
 

Wow this is what happens when you can’t get one message through and then all 4 do LOL
 

From: lsittler
Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2020 5:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Accurail kit 4498
 
Oops..made a mistake. Correct CN series is 514068-514499. Les

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Index to 101 Years of Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Official Minute Books and Records on 35 mm Microfilm 1849 to 1950 and C.E. Perkins Papers 1863-1907 Microfilm

John Larkin
 

It wasn't just a merger that triggered it.  Back in the late 70's the UP decided to clean out their old annex building NE of the HQs building.  They simply put gondolas on the service track and dumped everything out.  It's too long ago to remember much but I believe it was 4-5 stories tall.  Among the items thrown were boxes of 1930s era timetables.  A friend of mine happened to see it and loaded up a bunch for his collection and then passed one on to me - brand new condiition. 

In LA I bought a surplus filing cabinet and wound up with the original ink and linen drawings of some of the Las Vegas yard as well as other spots on the California Division (crew hotel, roundhouse drawings from LA, etc.).  I have them put away somewhere with the exception of two of the original drawings of the Pomona CA depot which I had framed and put on display.  I also wound up with old panel from the dispatcher's CTC board that was in LA.  No lights, but the original track patterns are preserved now.

It's amazing how much "stuff" is still around despite the best efforts of people to get rid of something that might have the taint of railroad history about it.  I'm glad I have what I was able to save.  Eventually I'm going to sell some of it because people willing to buy it are likely to preserve it and as I get older I have less time and use for some of the items.

John Larkin



On Monday, March 30, 2020, 7:52:51 PM CDT, Bob Webber <rgz17@...> wrote:


Well...one issue was the process itself, the materials just weren't meant to last forever - or rather, they were meant to, but they could not.  This is one reason I have been trying to find a service to transfer the film (movies & micro).

Another reason, somewhat associated, is that many people were under the (usually) mistaken notion that the media used was flammable, so tossed it, esp. once the emergency was over.  We had a standing order at several companies I worked at to toss any and all film over 5 years of age - X-rays, movies, what ever (of course, the X-rays weren't tossed, there was silver on them).

Yet another reason is change of management and/or mergers. Many railroads went through a change of management and direction in the 60s.  You had some that stayed true to the corporate heritage (for good or ill), others that wanted "all that old crap OUT!!"  With mergers, you'd have the actual winners of the merger (NOT always, or even USUALLY, the purchaser) come into the "enemy" camp and toss anything historical from the company that in one way or another, purchased the other.  So...you'd have some people from, oh I don't know, say SP come into Denver and station dumpsters down below the windows, and all manner of materials were simply tossed.  Same thing happened to the Wabash. Sae thing happened in airline mergers, software mergers, insurance mergers.  Vindictiveness and revenge all too often trumps (heh) the past.

And...from a railroad's point of view, retaining history of rail cars is not seen as a smart move.  Why?  We'll never use those again.  The only one who wants them are nerdy researchers and LAWYERS.  Don't believe me?  Look at the asbestos lawsuits.  We have lawyers calling at least once a month to get data on 80 year old rail cars, because there might be a dime in it for them.   Why take the chance?  What's that insulation material in that tank car?  No...you really don't want a record of that around. And who wants to separate wheat from chaff at that point?  Throw it ALL out.  Company records could be even worse.  Past legal issues get re-fought all the time.
 
Then there was simply cleaning.  A new manager would come into some department, say "get rid of that s**t!!"  He was given the job to glean up and garner space.  And they did it.  

Microfilm can be brittle, poorly packaged, poorly stored, stored incorrectly, etc.  And...one off its beneficial attributes became its biggest detriment.  Stuff smaller than a fist, is easy to lose, steal, throw out, over look, hide, "store (see hide)", etc.   Even in archives.  Even in well run archives. 

At 06:25 PM 3/30/2020, Tony Thompson wrote:
    This topic reminds me of something that came to light when I was researching the PFE book and interviewing retirees. Several told me the same story: that at the beginning of World War II, the government urged western companies to microfilm critical records and store them remotely.  The motivation being the possibility of Japanese incendiary attacks on the West Coast. Both SP and PFE did microfilm a lot of documents, specifically including car and locomotive drawings.
     No one has ever been able to tell me what happened to that microfilm, for SP and PFE or for anyone. If it exists somewhere, it might fill some of the gaps we have in the historical record for those companies -- and maybe for others.

Tony Thompson
tony@...




Bob Webber


Re: Index to 101 Years of Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Official Minute Books and Records on 35 mm Microfilm 1849 to 1950 and C.E. Perkins Papers 1863-1907 Microfilm

Bob Webber
 

Well...one issue was the process itself, the materials just weren't meant to last forever - or rather, they were meant to, but they could not.  This is one reason I have been trying to find a service to transfer the film (movies & micro).

Another reason, somewhat associated, is that many people were under the (usually) mistaken notion that the media used was flammable, so tossed it, esp. once the emergency was over.  We had a standing order at several companies I worked at to toss any and all film over 5 years of age - X-rays, movies, what ever (of course, the X-rays weren't tossed, there was silver on them).

Yet another reason is change of management and/or mergers. Many railroads went through a change of management and direction in the 60s.  You had some that stayed true to the corporate heritage (for good or ill), others that wanted "all that old crap OUT!!"  With mergers, you'd have the actual winners of the merger (NOT always, or even USUALLY, the purchaser) come into the "enemy" camp and toss anything historical from the company that in one way or another, purchased the other.  So...you'd have some people from, oh I don't know, say SP come into Denver and station dumpsters down below the windows, and all manner of materials were simply tossed.  Same thing happened to the Wabash. Sae thing happened in airline mergers, software mergers, insurance mergers.  Vindictiveness and revenge all too often trumps (heh) the past.

And...from a railroad's point of view, retaining history of rail cars is not seen as a smart move.  Why?  We'll never use those again.  The only one who wants them are nerdy researchers and LAWYERS.  Don't believe me?  Look at the asbestos lawsuits.  We have lawyers calling at least once a month to get data on 80 year old rail cars, because there might be a dime in it for them.   Why take the chance?  What's that insulation material in that tank car?  No...you really don't want a record of that around. And who wants to separate wheat from chaff at that point?  Throw it ALL out.  Company records could be even worse.  Past legal issues get re-fought all the time.
 
Then there was simply cleaning.  A new manager would come into some department, say "get rid of that s**t!!"  He was given the job to glean up and garner space.  And they did it.  

Microfilm can be brittle, poorly packaged, poorly stored, stored incorrectly, etc.  And...one off its beneficial attributes became its biggest detriment.  Stuff smaller than a fist, is easy to lose, steal, throw out, over look, hide, "store (see hide)", etc.   Even in archives.  Even in well run archives. 

At 06:25 PM 3/30/2020, Tony Thompson wrote:
    This topic reminds me of something that came to light when I was researching the PFE book and interviewing retirees. Several told me the same story: that at the beginning of World War II, the government urged western companies to microfilm critical records and store them remotely.  The motivation being the possibility of Japanese incendiary attacks on the West Coast. Both SP and PFE did microfilm a lot of documents, specifically including car and locomotive drawings.
     No one has ever been able to tell me what happened to that microfilm, for SP and PFE or for anyone. If it exists somewhere, it might fill some of the gaps we have in the historical record for those companies -- and maybe for others.

Tony Thompson
tony@...




Bob Webber


Re: Index to 101 Years of Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Official Minute Books and Records on 35 mm Microfilm 1849 to 1950 and C.E. Perkins Papers 1863-1907 Microfilm

Tony Thompson
 

This topic reminds me of something that came to light when I was researching the PFE book and interviewing retirees. Several told me the same story: that at the beginning of World War II, the government urged western companies to microfilm critical records and store them remotely. The motivation being the possibility of Japanese incendiary attacks on the West Coast. Both SP and PFE did microfilm a lot of documents, specifically including car and locomotive drawings.
No one has ever been able to tell me what happened to that microfilm, for SP and PFE or for anyone. If it exists somewhere, it might fill some of the gaps we have in the historical record for those companies -- and maybe for others.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Re: Index to 101 Years of Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Official Minute Books and Records on 35 mm Microfilm 1849 to 1950 and C.E. Perkins Papers 1863-1907 Microfilm

Charlie Vlk
 

Bruce-
Thanks. I tried Worldcat again following your suggestion and, while I came up with a many intriguing CB&Q references, even narrowing down the search to Microfilm the 101 Years or Board Meeting Notes did not come up. Nor did anything on Charles Elliot Perkins.
Charlie Vlk

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce A. Metcalf
Sent: Monday, March 30, 2020 12:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Index to 101 Years of Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Official Minute Books and Records on 35 mm Microfilm 1849 to 1950 and C.E. Perkins Papers 1863-1907 Microfilm

On 3/28/20 6:42 PM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

Please excuse the off-topic post but I need help on research:
I think that's mostly what we do here.


A couple of years ago I ran across an online detailed catalog
description of each of the 45 or so CB&Q microfilm rolls and an
additional 15 or so on C.E. Perkins papers 1863-1907 with call numbers
in some online catalog of a library or college library.
AFAIK it was a simple Google search. I somehow lost the link and
cannot find it again after trying every conceivable search term and
variation thereof that I can think of. ...

Any ideas on finding this website beyond the normal Google, Bing, etc.
search engines???
Try <http://www.worldcat.org/>. It's a union catalog of hundreds of large libraries, with an emphasis on university and research libraries.
I've found it an invaluable for seeing who has what.

Cheers,
/ Bruce /


Re: Norfolk and Western H2a split side triples

Rich Yoder
 

Hi Brad.

An interesting topic indeed.

In 1948 the production of H2A cars started 3,000 cars we’re built by Virginia Bridge and Iron Co. The Split side sheets we’re more a product of what steel sheeting was available verses having anything to do with rebuilding. The “A” was a product of a slight revise of the H2, (which was considered an experimental car.) The Principal design changes from the H2 were the reinforcement of the top side angles, corner gusset and the end sheets because of experiments  with coal  shake-out machines.  Most of the car parts were made in the Roanoke Shops and most cars we’re assembled in Portsmouth. In 1956 The last few thousand cars we’re built by AC&F (1M), Roanoke Shops (1.5M)  And Greenville Car (500) Bethlehem Steel (500). Bring the total cars built to 13,500 from 1948 until 1956.

Rich Yoder

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brad Andonian via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, March 23, 2020 12:00 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Norfolk and Western H2a split side triples

 

N&W split side h2a


I have found conflicting dates on the actual build dates of these cars.    Yoder has 52/53 but I think that was the rebuild date...  Can anyone please pass me the correct dates?

 

Thanks,


Re: Accurail kit 4498

lsittler
 

Oops..made a mistake. Correct CN series is 514068-514499. Les


Re: Accurail kit 4498

lsittler
 

Hi Dennis- So it turns out I have a number of the 4299 kits purchased years ago. Am I correct that these models are based on the CN 511353-513052 series car?. Also, what is the Don Valentine conversion kit you mention? Les


Re: Accurail kit 4498

lsittler
 



So I have some questions about these Accurail cars. I have a number of the 4299 cars I bought years ago (painted oxide red with data only). Dennis Storzek states that these cars are based on a CN car series- does anyone know the actual car series this model is intended to represent? I'm thinking the CN IO group may have prototype info on the cars and I'll check with them. But don't know where to start.  If others have some info it would be interesting to learn more, including whether appropriate decals are available. And now it seems that the DT&I may have had similar cars. Unfortunately I don't remember the door and a half version discussion with Don Valentine and the NERS detail kit. Maybe somebody can point me to the emails about that and for what railroad(s) that NERS kit was used. Frankly I thought these cars were pretty much unusable for my railroad but now I wonder based on Dennis's comments if that is not true. Thanks. Les


Re: Accurail kit 4498

lsittler
 

Hi Dennis- I read this post with interest. I’m a new guy on this site so please bear with me. It turns out that I have a number of the 4299 cars, which I bought many years ago. Can you tell me what CN car number series this model is intended to represent?  Also, if you know of any prototype information that’s available I would be grateful. Same goes for decals. Secondly, I was fortunate enough to buy one of your CN 1917 boxcar resin kits. The resin castings are truly wonderful but since this is an older kit the instructions are somewhat inscrutable to me. Since I model 1961 I am interested in the later version of this car. I realize I will need to utilize an AB brake system. No diagram is provided. However, the instructions state that later “cast steel AAR style trucks” were used- do you know what trucks are intended by this language? Also, it is stated that “a length of old rail (later stated to be code 40) was fitted to the center of each end to add a fifth post”.  I am not clear what that means. I take it that these cars were numbered in the 500,000 series on CN. The decals look somewhat beaten up in my kit.  Any new ones available? Thanks for your help. Les
 

From: Dennis Storzek
Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2020 11:57 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Accurail kit 4498
 
On Tue, Mar 24, 2020 at 12:48 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
At the risk of piling on: Clark, I assume that you have a 4598 (there is no 4500 series).
These kits are now 29 years old, being released in 1991, IIRC. They were originally released as the 4000 series (wood ends and doors) 4200 series (7/8 steel ends and wood doors) and the 4400 series (steel ends and doors, At some point over the intervening years, we upgraded all the lettering art work. To avoid confusion between the old and new kits, they were all given new stock numbers, ratcheting each series up 100.
The only one of these models that I know to be prototypical is the 4100 series which, with a little work, makes a decent model of some CN cars built ca. 1918-27 (see attached).
The 4000/4100 series is truly the CN car. At the time I wanted to do a CB&Q car, but in those years builder's drawings weren't as easy to come by as they are now. I had worked with the late Stafford Swain and Ken Goslett to obtain drawings of the 1916 Canadian Government Railways car I did as a resin kit (Safford wanted a later car with the Hutchins roof but they couldn't find drawings) and they never stopped looking, so by the time I was working on the Accurail tooling, they had drawings for the more common CN car of the 1920's.

The 4200/4300 series car with the 7/8 corrugated ends is also a CN prototype, but more obscure. These started life as low roof door and a half automobile cars, but the CN quickly found they were too small; auto cars universally grew to 10'-0" IH during the twenties, so the CN rebuilt them as 6' door boxcars, retaining the corrugated ends. We gave some thought to doing the door and a half version, but it's really an atypical car with its low roof and there were not a lot of potential road names. Don Valentine of New England Rail Service settled the matter by bringing out his conversion kit.

This whole project was done with 3M's Tartan Tool process; sintered steel cavities formed over positive masters, very much like resin kit masters, and I had a Youngstown door pattern that was adaptable. Staff, Ken, and I discussed the possibility that the CN had replaced the doors on some cars, but we never did find any photos. However, in 1991 there weren't a lot of options for easy assembly models of pre-war prototypes, and this third version could be a stand-in for a lot of things, although those DM&IR cars may be the closest match. The idea was the third version would be cheap and easy to do. If I would have known what it was actually going to cost, I probably would not have done it.

Dennis Storzek

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: RPM Chicagoland News

golden1014
 

That's interesting about RPM events and weddings.  When I was running St. Louis RPM, I ran into scheduling problems every year--almost every time due to weddings.  Weddings bring in a lot more money because of all the catering and alcohol of course.  Around 2010 I started selling our meet to the staff as "an event catering to happy retirees who have plenty of money, and are pleasant and will follow the rules, and most importantly we won't get drunk and cause any trouble".  The first time I said that the staff was taken by surprise, but they thought about it and realized it was true.  They gave us everything we wanted.  They liked the idea of an easy event where everybody cleans up after themselves.

I hope Frank can rebuild Naperville.  The attendee base is already there.  The first St. Louis RPM in 2004 was a one-day event, 90 attendees, in a community center, and 15 years later it was 2-1/2 days, almost 650 attendees.  Now that there's no hotel fees to worry about in Chicago, I think---if Frank can keep costs to an absolute minimum---there's no reason why he couldn't get 750 or 1,000 attendees on the first go.  

John Golden
Ramstein-Miesenbach, Germany


Re: Photo: Early Santa Fe Boxcars At Eskridge Depot

David Vinci
 

Do you suppose those are sugar beets they are loading?

 

Dave Vinci

O==’=::

 


Re: DL&W brake system help

Lester Breuer
 

Mike provides the answer.   In 1953 they should hav AB brakes.  Thank You Mike and Al for your help.

Lester Breuer


Re: DL&W brake system help

Allan Smith
 

Thanks Mike that is a big help

Al Smith

On Monday, March 30, 2020, 02:40:16 PM PDT, Schleigh Mike via Groups.Io <mike_schleigh@...> wrote:


Hello Group!

When Pierre announced these cars I placed a notice about the ELRRHS reprint of the DL&W's 1952 "Car Department -- Classification of Fright Equipment."  This reference lists 245 cars in service and that "AB Brakes Being Applied."

Hope this helps with any 'timing' issues.

Regards----Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.

On Monday, March 30, 2020, 05:19:25 PM EDT, Allan Smith <smithal9@...> wrote:



Railway Prototype Cyc Vol 24 P83 stated that DL&W series 11350-11599 were rebuilt April thru September1936 and equipped with new Youngstown steel sides, Hutchins all-steel Dry lading roofs, staggered Youngstown corrugated steel doors with Camel roller-lift fixtures enclosing 12'-6 1/4"wide door openings, Ajax Type 13396 power hand brakes, Evans Auto-Loaders and twelve chain wells. When rebuilt the cars retained their original Andrews truck sideframes, KC schedule air brake systems, wood running boards and brake steps and 5-5-5 Murphy ends with newly fabricated extensions between the top and middle sections. The cars were assigned the AAR XAR automobile car classification and weighed 53,000 lbs.

These cars are on my Sierra RR list in 1952 and I have them to build, so I am also curious to see if they had the KC brake valves replaced do to AAR requirements.

Al Smith
Sonora CA
On Monday, March 30, 2020, 11:40:57 AM PDT, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:


I am looking at Delaware, Lackawanna & Western auto double door rebuilt steel box, series 11300 to 11599, rebuilt 1935 to 1937   The Yarmouth Model Works kit #115 comes with K brakes.   Upon looking at the Jan. 1953 ORER I see 199 cars still in service.  My question did the cars in service receive AB brakes or did they not run in Interchange service?

Thank You in advance for your time and effort to answer.
Lester Breuer


Re: DL&W brake system help

Lester Breuer
 

Al as you state these cars are written up in RP CYC 24 and  I am aware they are shown prior to rebuild in RP CYC 16.  The data does say K brake stayed when rebuilt  in 1936.   However, I am asking about 1953.  Were they changed to AB or not then?
Lester Breuer


Re: Photo: Early Santa Fe Boxcars At Eskridge Depot

Allan Smith
 

The Bx-U boxcars were built in 1890 series 40948-41440. They were originally built as Fe-D Furniture cars and given the number series 80400-81010, soon renumbered into the 6095-6600 and 6601-7200 series. In 1906 they were reclassified into boxcars becoming classes Bx-T and Bx-U almost all gone from the roster by the early 1920's. So the date on this photo is somewhat dubious.

Al Smith
Sonora CA

On Monday, March 30, 2020, 02:01:11 PM PDT, earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:


Interesting in that 41xxx series does not appear in the 1901 or 1905 ORER.
They do appear in the Mach 1907 ORER

Howard Garner


Re: DL&W brake system help

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Group!

When Pierre announced these cars I placed a notice about the ELRRHS reprint of the DL&W's 1952 "Car Department -- Classification of Fright Equipment."  This reference lists 245 cars in service and that "AB Brakes Being Applied."

Hope this helps with any 'timing' issues.

Regards----Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.

On Monday, March 30, 2020, 05:19:25 PM EDT, Allan Smith <smithal9@...> wrote:



Railway Prototype Cyc Vol 24 P83 stated that DL&W series 11350-11599 were rebuilt April thru September1936 and equipped with new Youngstown steel sides, Hutchins all-steel Dry lading roofs, staggered Youngstown corrugated steel doors with Camel roller-lift fixtures enclosing 12'-6 1/4"wide door openings, Ajax Type 13396 power hand brakes, Evans Auto-Loaders and twelve chain wells. When rebuilt the cars retained their original Andrews truck sideframes, KC schedule air brake systems, wood running boards and brake steps and 5-5-5 Murphy ends with newly fabricated extensions between the top and middle sections. The cars were assigned the AAR XAR automobile car classification and weighed 53,000 lbs.

These cars are on my Sierra RR list in 1952 and I have them to build, so I am also curious to see if they had the KC brake valves replaced do to AAR requirements.

Al Smith
Sonora CA
On Monday, March 30, 2020, 11:40:57 AM PDT, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:


I am looking at Delaware, Lackawanna & Western auto double door rebuilt steel box, series 11300 to 11599, rebuilt 1935 to 1937   The Yarmouth Model Works kit #115 comes with K brakes.   Upon looking at the Jan. 1953 ORER I see 199 cars still in service.  My question did the cars in service receive AB brakes or did they not run in Interchange service?

Thank You in advance for your time and effort to answer.
Lester Breuer


Re: DL&W brake system help

Allan Smith
 


Railway Prototype Cyc Vol 24 P83 stated that DL&W series 11350-11599 were rebuilt April thru September1936 and equipped with new Youngstown steel sides, Hutchins all-steel Dry lading roofs, staggered Youngstown corrugated steel doors with Camel roller-lift fixtures enclosing 12'-6 1/4"wide door openings, Ajax Type 13396 power hand brakes, Evans Auto-Loaders and twelve chain wells. When rebuilt the cars retained their original Andrews truck sideframes, KC schedule air brake systems, wood running boards and brake steps and 5-5-5 Murphy ends with newly fabricated extensions between the top and middle sections. The cars were assigned the AAR XAR automobile car classification and weighed 53,000 lbs.

These cars are on my Sierra RR list in 1952 and I have them to build, so I am also curious to see if they had the KC brake valves replaced do to AAR requirements.

Al Smith
Sonora CA

On Monday, March 30, 2020, 11:40:57 AM PDT, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:


I am looking at Delaware, Lackawanna & Western auto double door rebuilt steel box, series 11300 to 11599, rebuilt 1935 to 1937   The Yarmouth Model Works kit #115 comes with K brakes.   Upon looking at the Jan. 1953 ORER I see 199 cars still in service.  My question did the cars in service receive AB brakes or did they not run in Interchange service?

Thank You in advance for your time and effort to answer.
Lester Breuer


Re: Photo: Early Santa Fe Boxcars At Eskridge Depot

earlyrail
 

Interesting in that 41xxx series does not appear in the 1901 or 1905 ORER.
They do appear in the Mach 1907 ORER

Howard Garner

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