Date   

Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Todd Sullivan
 

My experience is consistent with Nelson's, with various flat finishes.  I recall one situation where I experienced the 'frosting' of the flat coat, and I let it dry for 20 minutes and resprayed with a light coat of lacquer thinner (probably automotive grade, it's what I generally use) and the frosting disappeared.

I have also found that, when spraying Tamiya rattle can acrylic lacquer paint, you do need to spray on successive light coats and let each one dry.  I have to spray on our apartment balcony, since I  have no paint booth, where it is breezy, and I've gotten impatient and not waited until the wetness is gone, and also sprayed too close to the model.  A couple of times, the paint produced small 'bubbles' of paint that do not dry flat.  Those were my mistakes, and other that that, Tamiya paint in spray cans is amazing and easy to use. 

BTW, every brand of paint I've used has its own characteristics, and we, as modelers, need to experiment and learn their peculiarities.  Going from Floquil lacquer to AccuPaint was one of my biggest leaps.

Keep staying healthy and safe!

Todd Sullivan


Re: MP USRA gon, was FSA/OWI photos

Bob Webber
 

The USRA Gondolas in 1918 H&B Lots 5176, 5180, 5183 had pin & chains for both side & end doors.  Alternative mechanisms, panels and other details were made for the SSC 1932 USRA alternate.  I haven't yet run into the General Arrangement drawings, they are most likely there as well.  The butt plate & hinges, pin & chains, brake details and other drawings have been scanned. 

The door mechanism drawings for drop bottom gons usually are vendor drawings, not manufacturer drawings.  While a general arrangement drawing will show some information, the URE (or other vendor) drawings are referenced, though rarely copied for such.

At 08:53 AM 4/14/2020, David via groups.io wrote:
The original USRA gons used a windup shaft mechanism for the doors. Wine door locks were used on a number of copies built in the 1920s, and sometimes retrofitted to the originals.

David Thompson



Bob Webber


Unusual trucks on gon in American Smelting photo

spsalso
 

In the first American Smelting photo, from the group that Paul Krueger so kindly posted (message #171547):

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8b14180/ 

there is a gon, three cars to the right of the KCS vinegar car.  It has sheet metal trucks.  I would call them Fox, but I see that they have a longish wheelbase.

It seems odd to me that sheet metal trucks would be running at this date.  The car appears to be Union Pacific.  To me.

I wonder at the thoughts in this group on the matter.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Eric Hansmann
 

I’ve had sputtering rattle cans of Dullcoat ruin freight car finishes. I swore those off many years ago. I had used rattle cans of Model Master Clear Flat with good success before I set up a spray booth.

 

I now prefer to use the airbrush to spray Model Master Flat Clear Acryl with a few drop of the appropriate freight car color to add a chalky appearance to start the weathering process. The flat + drops of color also cuts the whiteness of decals. You can compare the before and after on a boxcar in this blog post.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2017/04/21/southern-pacific-a-50-5-automobile-box-car/

 

YMMV.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2020 9:27 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

 

Am I all wet or are those of us who have stuck with the tried and true flat and/or gloss finishes by

suppliers such as Scalecoat and Testors really missing something? From all the complaints viewed

herein over the past week I think most of these new flat and clear finishes leave A LOT to be desired.

I'll stick with the older ones. As we say here in New England, "If it ain't broke don't fix it"

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Am I all wet or are those of us who have stuck with the tried and true flat and/or gloss finishes by
suppliers such as Scalecoat and Testors really missing something? From all the complaints viewed
herein over the past week I think most of these new flat and clear finishes leave A LOT to be desired.
I'll stick with the older ones. As we say here in New England, "If it ain't broke don't fix it"

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: SP&S Freight Cars from Salvaged Freight Car

Richard Wilkens
 

David,

The info is from the SP&S equipment cards but that isn't to say some clerk got it wrong.

Rich Wilkens
Archivist, SP&S Railway Historical Society


Re: Question re: Lidgerwoods

Richard Wilkens
 

SP&S had two Lidgerwood's, L-1 and L-2 that were put in service in 1910. The machinery for L-1 was purchased from Northern Pacific in 1908 and the car was assembled by the SP&S from parts from wrecked Dirt Car No. 1071 which was destroyed at Vancouver in August 1910. Its not clear if the machinery for L-2 was purchased used or new, it was mounted on Columbia River & Northern Flat Car No. 331. Both Lidgerwood's were retired in 1938 on AFE 6383.

Rich Wilkens
Archivist, SP&S Railway Historical Society


MP USRA gon, was FSA/OWI photos

David
 

The original USRA gons used a windup shaft mechanism for the doors. Wine door locks were used on a number of copies built in the 1920s, and sometimes retrofitted to the originals.

David Thompson


Re: boxcar roof mystery

Guy Wilber
 


 Dennis wrote:

“Seems I recall the NKP had some auto cars that were built based on an earlier design, where it was found the new diagonal pressing interfered with the loaders, and so the cars were built with diagonal panels EXCEPT for two; those were the older rectangular design to gibe the needed clearance.“

Dennis, 

The "mixed panel" roofs were discussed some time ago: 


Ed Hawkins wrote:

"Dave,

I have confirmed the following cars having the combination diagonal
panel/Murphy panel roofs. There were probably more. All were auto cars
with 15' wide door openings built new with these roofs. You have
already referenced Tony's book and some specific SP cars.

D&TS 5000-5099, 2-55, Greenville
MP 88900-88999, 6-57, MP
NJI&I 3300-3399, 1-51, ACF
NKP 86100-86249, 12-49, ACF
NKP 86200-86349, 1-55, Greenville
Numerous SP cars, 1950-1956, all built by SP
WAB 19800-19999, 5-53, ACF
WAB 20000-20199,"


Guy Wilber wrote:

"Ed,

Other than the SP cars, none of the above cars were equipped with Auto~Loaders. The balance were in parts service.

Whether, or not, the cars were purchased by the respective roads contemplating installation of Auto~Loaders I do not know. Until Evans developed the Type "F" with a boom hoist and the Type "G" the rectangular panel was required to facilitate the supports for the lifting sheave hanger frame and the similar frame that supported the safety hook assembly used to secure the racks when stored against the roof of cars.

Evidently, Evans lift assemblies were also used within auto parts cars utilized for shipping car bodies. I have some literature on the system but have yet to find a complete installation drawing. I believe that may offer another connection to the mixed panel roofs."



Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada




Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Nelson Moyer
 

I haven’t used Tamiya dull coat, so I can’t comment directly. I have seen a little white powder accumulation on SS car Z-channel when I got overzealous with Model Master Clear Flat and put down a wet coat. The talc or whatever they use tends to settle next to vertical details, on ladder stiles and rungs, or on grab irons, etc. The best way to avoid that is to use a couple of light passes, let it dry, and it it’s not flat enough, repeat the application. Also shake the can frequently to keep the particulate suspended and evenly mixed.  I never had that problem with Dullcote, and I don’t use acrylic flats because they cloud the paint color. I’ve never had enough powder accumulation to have to redo a car. The slight white residue I’ve seen can be covered during weathering, since it’s already in location that accumulate dirt and grime.

 

Sometimes Dullcote will cloud if it’s sprayed on a humid day. If it’s not too bad, spray Testors Universal Thinner on the car and let it day, If it’s bad, you can try brushing the thinner on with a wide flat brush and let it dry, but you risk ruining decals if they’re not well sealed.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Riddell
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2020 6:57 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

 

Has anyone sprayed Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 from the can ?
On several occasions it has left a WHITE POWDER RESIDUE on the model.
Has anyone experienced this ?

John Riddell


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Paul Doggett
 

That’s the French chalk it’s the flatting agent in the varnish. I have not used Tamiya but I had it happen with Humbrol matt varnish you really have to shake the can especially if it’s been stored for some time.
Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 14 Apr 2020, at 12:57, John Riddell <riddellj@...> wrote:

Has anyone sprayed Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 from the can ?
On several occasions it has left a WHITE POWDER RESIDUE on the model.
Has anyone experienced this ?

John Riddell


Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

John Riddell
 

Has anyone sprayed Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 from the can ?
On several occasions it has left a WHITE POWDER RESIDUE on the model.
Has anyone experienced this ?

John Riddell


Re: Photos: Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Company Tank Cars

Mark Vinski
 

Is the truck being used to move the car with a connection to the coupler?

Mark Vinski


Re: Question re: Lidgerwoods

Chuck Soule
 

I am aware that the Northern Pacific had a Lidgerwood at their Auburn, WA engine facility, but I am not sure I could find a picture of it in our current lockdown situation.

Chuck Soule


Re: Photo: Boiler Loads

Allen Cain
 

I sent the link to the photo to Multiscale Digital who produces some really nice freight car loads.  He will produce it in the near future and based on other items that I have bought from him, it will be a quality piece.

Luckily the photo has two of the large boilers loaded in opposite directions so he can see all four sides.

If you have not seen his loads, check them out on Ebay or on his site:


And no, I have not stake in his company.

Allen Cain 


Re: Question re: Lidgerwoods

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

I guess I should step in here and mention the issue #7 of my newsletter WORK EXTRA is all about the Lidgerwood Rapid Unloader, including all the photos I have of them and plans. Those interested in purchasing a copy can contact me at the above e-mail address.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Lloyd Keyser <lloydkeyser@...>
To: main <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Apr 13, 2020 10:09 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: Lidgerwoods

There is an excellent  full page article on the C&NW Lidgerwood car pulling a ten wheeler backwards at the 40th Street shops in Chicago. The brake shoes are replaced with cutters to reshape the tire back into the proper contour without  having to use a drop pit. The article has two pictures and drawings of the cutters. I cannot scan so it is on page 42 of Volume II C&NW in Color by Lloyd Keyser published by Morning Sun. 

On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 7:48 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
Don Valentine wrote:


Re: June 1941. "Railroad yards. Milwaukee, WI

John Barry
 

Thanks Doug, 

I have a full set of the RPCs and have only begun to scratch the surface.

John

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 08:16:04 PM EDT, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:


Just about all meat packers used leased reefers from the 30s on. Those reefers could have the meat packers reporting marks or could have the reporting marks of the owner. Union Refrigeration, General American, Mather, North American were all major players in the leased meat reefer market. Even companies that had their own reporting marks, also used reefers with the owner’s reporting marks and the meat packers name or logo.

 

Dubuque, leased from several companies, including both Union Refrigeration and General American. I don’t have a color photo of a Dubuque meat reefer in the P/L as shown in the photo. But I do have a b/w photo, see attached.

 

URTX cars tended to be more orange, which can be verified by looking through Gene Green’s Refrigerator Color Guide by Morning Sun. This book has the later Dubuque scheme, but not the earlier P/L as seen in the 1941 MILW yard photo.

 

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia #14 has photos of General American Meat reefers, including a photo of  car leased to Dubuque on p. 90. It is not lettered for Dubuque and has URTX reporting marks. Remember General American purchased Union Refrigeration in 1929.

 

Note the color variations on the two MDT reefers just beyond the Northern Refrigerator Car Co reefer.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Barry
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 4:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] June 1941. "Railroad yards. Milwaukee, WI

 

Also of note is the URTX meat reefer marked for Dubuque Packing Company.  What color is that, orange?  Very different from the adjacent Northern Refrigerator to the right or the Milwaukee branded car to the left.  And the dark lettering contrasts with the white seen on the tonally similar MILW boxes in the forground.   

 

John Barry

 

ATSF North Bay Lines 

Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

Lovettsville, VA

 

707-490-9696 

 

PO Box 44736 

Washington, DC 20026-4736

 

 

On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 02:03:13 PM EDT, John Larkin via groups.io <jflarkingrc@...> wrote:

 

 

That shot highlights 3 Milwaukee boxcars with 3 different paint schemes.  I'm not a Milwaukee expert by any means but the cars appear to be built to the same plan.  That's one of the best pix I've ever seen illustrating how paint schemes can vary on what appears to be identical cars.

 

John Larkin

 

On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 12:09:21 PM CDT, Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...> wrote:

 

 


Re: Question re: Lidgerwoods

Lloyd Keyser
 

There is an excellent  full page article on the C&NW Lidgerwood car pulling a ten wheeler backwards at the 40th Street shops in Chicago. The brake shoes are replaced with cutters to reshape the tire back into the proper contour without  having to use a drop pit. The article has two pictures and drawings of the cutters. I cannot scan so it is on page 42 of Volume II C&NW in Color by Lloyd Keyser published by Morning Sun. 

On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 7:48 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
Don Valentine wrote:

     Jeez Tony, I thought that's what the made wheel lathes for! I'd like to see a photo of that. 

   Of course, but you no doubt realize that pulling the drivers off a steam locomotive to take them to the lathe might be more trouble that the Lidgerwood method, which is carried on without disassembling the running gear. Photo below, taken in 1949 at West Oakland. You can see the cable heading off to the left that pulls the locomotive (Arnold Menke collection). For those interested, the flat car is an old F-50-2. 

Tony Thompson



Re: Question re: Lidgerwoods

Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...>
 

It's a poor copy but you will get the idea.


MP USRA gon, was FSA/OWI photos

mopacfirst
 

Looking closer at the broadside photo of the MP gon, the door latches are plainly visible.  The MP diagram says these are Wine.

But I've also noticed that on the Intermountain model, there are no latches.  Were there some drop door designs that didn't need these?  I'm assuming not, but I'd like to throw that question out.

Back to the prototype, there are four guys shoveling the contents over the side.  Their aim was pretty good, since there are four discrete piles on the embankment.  The doors probably wouldn't have been a good idea here.

After these 3000 cars were built in 1919, MoPac ordered 750 clones in 1925, with 10 drop doors instead of 8.  In typical MP practice, along with the AB brake upgrade the cars also got power brake gear  Moving forward in time, by 1949 a number of the original cars were rebuilt with steel sides.  The last of them lasted to the late fifties.

Another note on the diagram says 'a few of these cars are fitted up to haul containers', meaning the small Youngstown limestone containers.

Ron Merrick

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