Date   

Re: Speaking of decals

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Craig, appreciate that.  The decals on your flat car look very nice as does the car.  Who's tractors did you use for the load?


On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 3:28 PM Craig Wilson <agecompanyphotog@...> wrote:
Fenton ... I have purchased a few of the K4 decal sets and applied a few.  I bought samples to study their accuracy to prototypes for which I have studied/collected data (specifically DT&I and Ann Arbor RR).  A lot of what I found is quite accurate with regard to sizes and specific lettering (data, reweighs, etc.) but not everything.  For example, on the Ann Arbor caboose set the compass herald is oversize making it unusable for the cabooses.  But the compass size makes it correct for using on the DT&I boxcars that were assigned to the AA (in a timeframe beyond the scope of this list) and partially repainted with AA heralds and reporting marks.

Not knowing the thought process or planning that went into the production of certain sets, I can't help but ask "what were you thinking?"  Another example:  I bought one of the Ann Arbor FA-2/RS-1 sets to see if the numbers could be used to renumber the Rapido AA FA-2 models (size, color, etc.).  They look suitable for this task BUT there is no "4" in the number jumble (the AA units were 50-50A through 56-56A).  Again ... "what were you thinking?"

On the positive side, the K4 decals are offered in an amazing range of scales (from G to Z).  So it is possible to get obtain things like heralds in different sizes needed for other freight cars.  I'm attaching a photo of a DT&I flatcar that needed a tiny compass herald with the "Connections" slogan.  The N-scale K4 set for DT&I gondolas with coil hoods provided the correct size for the HO model shown.  Need a large herald for the side of a water tank or shop building?  Look at the O-scale or G-scale version of the K4 decal.

Application:  the K4 decals are well printed and have nice thin film.  I ran into no issues applying them like any other decal.

Bottom line:  an extensive decal line that is worth looking at.  I found it best to purchase one set to examine the sizes and determine how it can best be used.  If judged useful, I go back and make a second order.  As always, YMMV.

Craig Wilson



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Speaking of decals

Craig Wilson
 

Fenton ... I have purchased a few of the K4 decal sets and applied a few.  I bought samples to study their accuracy to prototypes for which I have studied/collected data (specifically DT&I and Ann Arbor RR).  A lot of what I found is quite accurate with regard to sizes and specific lettering (data, reweighs, etc.) but not everything.  For example, on the Ann Arbor caboose set the compass herald is oversize making it unusable for the cabooses.  But the compass size makes it correct for using on the DT&I boxcars that were assigned to the AA (in a timeframe beyond the scope of this list) and partially repainted with AA heralds and reporting marks.

Not knowing the thought process or planning that went into the production of certain sets, I can't help but ask "what were you thinking?"  Another example:  I bought one of the Ann Arbor FA-2/RS-1 sets to see if the numbers could be used to renumber the Rapido AA FA-2 models (size, color, etc.).  They look suitable for this task BUT there is no "4" in the number jumble (the AA units were 50-50A through 56-56A).  Again ... "what were you thinking?"

On the positive side, the K4 decals are offered in an amazing range of scales (from G to Z).  So it is possible to get obtain things like heralds in different sizes needed for other freight cars.  I'm attaching a photo of a DT&I flatcar that needed a tiny compass herald with the "Connections" slogan.  The N-scale K4 set for DT&I gondolas with coil hoods provided the correct size for the HO model shown.  Need a large herald for the side of a water tank or shop building?  Look at the O-scale or G-scale version of the K4 decal.

Application:  the K4 decals are well printed and have nice thin film.  I ran into no issues applying them like any other decal.

Bottom line:  an extensive decal line that is worth looking at.  I found it best to purchase one set to examine the sizes and determine how it can best be used.  If judged useful, I go back and make a second order.  As always, YMMV.

Craig Wilson


Density of coal

Dave Nelson
 

I’m working on a problem involving the density of coal and need some help.  Does anyone have a wheel report containing cars loaded with coal that have the weight recorded?  What is the car and weight listed?  The wheel reports I have do not include car weight.

 

I’m asking because well documented coal densities you can find on the web are all densities based on ground coal (think ground coffee) which is done specifically because rail shipped coal, being larger, has substantial air gaps that lessen the overall density of the load.

 

IOW the published numbers are going to be higher than the same cubic volume found in any hopper.  I’m looking for the later number.

 

T.I.A.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: GM&O and A&WP colors

Steve SANDIFER
 

Oddball also had Farmall decals. I put them on my tractors and painted the silver on wheels and exhaust.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 9:36 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GM&O and A&WP colors

 


SUNSHINE had Farmall decals for their resin kit. I bought extras when LifeLike
did their tractors.



On 4/14/2020 11:29 AM, D. Scott Chatfield wrote:

My friend Joe Sullivan asked me the following:

 

 

1.  What color were GM&O flat cars in 1952 - 1954 time period?  The 42' 50T "USRA-ish" ones.

 

2.  I am assuming that A&WP flat cars and GA RR gondolas (specifically the ones rebuilt from flat cars) of that period were freight car brown (Langley Jr., Hanson & Silcox won't argue) .  Does anyone here dissent?  Does anyone dissent from assumption that the GA/A&WP freight car brown resembled the L&N color, except maybe a bit more LIGHT brownish that pure oxide red?

 

3. Does anyone know or a photo of one of the few CofGa 40' 1937 door-and-a-half boxcars with SUPERIOR doors?

 

4.  There's an online rumor of the existence of HO scale Farmall tractor decals.  Does such a thing actually exist??

 

Thanks

 

Scott Chatfield

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Milwaukee Road Silk Train

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

Don Valentine inquires whether or not HO brass importer Beaver Creek produced a silk car.  Yes, they produced a very nice model of a quite distinct and handsome SP car, a boxed one of which resides on my off-stage “For Sale” shelf as we speak.  The California State Railroad museum has the  body of one (the only?) stored at the SRR historic site in Jamestown, CA  (it played a completely unheralded part and a turning point in the successful across-the-table negotiations with the SP that underpinned the founding of the CSRM- a story for another time). If my memory is correct, these cars were also used for high value tea shipments.  

The Milwaukee photo -I believe- is probably another of several Milwaukee silk trains recorded on photographs by Asahel Curtis, a Seattle photographer who was often engaged by the Milwaukee at the time.   The photo currently depicted looks to me like it has been altered  for effect, showing an endless length of identical baggage cars longer than what other Bipolar-led silk train photos show might be more likely.

Other of Curtis’s photos show that the more common Milwaukee silk cars (added to the baggage cars were drawn from two series of low slung wood ice express reefers from the Milwaukee Shops in 1912 (and 13?), specifically built and so lettered for “Fish Service” These very possibly were among the very first true “express reefers” , and they constituted and remained the Milwaukee’s only  express reefers -aside from a few rib sided one-offs in later years- until their final demise as milk cars post WWII. I do not believe that they ever went off line, and they were rarely photographed.  Al Kalmbach loved these cars, Walthers made decals, and elevation plans were published in the earliest of MRs (1934?), and then subsequently in serial volumes of the MR Cyclopedia. They never made it to a kit, or to brass (in the pipeline at Shoreham Shops when they closed down). 

It would be a matter of semantics to argue one way or another whether silk trains were freight or passenger. The cars used  were built and designed to be used in passenger-like service, and the trains operated on passenger train schedules.  Of course, the lading was…freight!

Denny


 
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




Re: Anyone Want A First Generation SFRD Mechanical Reefer?

charles slater
 

Bob I think the Rr-56 would be the best one. There were more of them and 1955 would catch more modelers, and they lasted as box cars in the Bx-202 class until the 1980's.
Charlie Slater

Sent from Outlook



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 4, 2020 11:29 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Anyone Want A First Generation SFRD Mechanical Reefer?
 

Anyone Want A First Generation SFRD Mechanical Reefer?

I am good friends with a person working for a major model manufacturer. His area of expertise is product development.

For years he and I have been discussing the possibility of bringing to market an accurate HO scale first generation SFRD mechanical refrigerator car. The cut-off year would be 1960.

The car would be produced in styrene and probably only in R-T-R form.

From our discussions this project almost came to fruition a few years ago but stalled due to competition from other projects.  

Times have changed and now this has become a real possibility.

There are "foobie" cars offered by Athearn and Walthers, but I share a belief with others that there is a market for a more accurate car.

First, I want to hear from you which first generation mechanical reefer is of most interest to you and specifically why you are interested in a particular car.

Your choices are the following SFRD classes:

Rr-31 (5 cars - 1955)

Rr-54 (30 cars - 1953

Rr-56 (150 cars -1955)

Rr-60 (25 Cars - 1958

Rr-61 (25 Cars - 1958)

Rr-65 (100 cars - 1960)

Rr-66 (100 cars - 1960)

I'm fairly certain there are builder's drawings of all these classes but that will need to be verified.

Factors influencing the manufacturer's decision will be how many paint/repaint schemes are possible (including MOW), and cost of modifying the tooling to produce insulated boxcar versions and cars representing other railroads.

Once the manufacturer selects one of these choices I will ask you to submit your photos, especially those with dates, so the manufacturer can evaluate paint schemes and modifications to the as-built prototype.

If there is enough good prototype information available there is a real probability a specific car will be produced.

Thank you.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Speaking of decals

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks for the heads up Gary, good to know
Fenton

On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 1:51 PM Gary Bechdol <garyeb1947@...> wrote:
Fenton:  

I ordered several sets of ACL steam locomotive decals from K4.  I had twp locomotive professionally painted, but when the painter applied the white decals, the printing was so thin that the decal did not show up on the black locomotives.  Even doubling up the decals did not help.  Maybe I had an early set, but before you try decaling a car, do a test first on a piece of scrap using the paint color you are applying to the car.

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA

On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 12:30 PM O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:
By the way has anyone used the K4 decals out of Dayton OH. I stumbled across them on eBay and ordered about 10 different sets.  They have some nice C&NJ, ACL( a surprising variety of ACL) and others including some interesting private tank cars that I needed for future projects.  I haven't use them yet but they are pretty crisply printed and look good on paper.  I'll et you know when I do the ACL or C&NJ cars coming up in my build shop. 
If anyone has used them let me know what you think
Fenton

On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 12:21 PM Richard Brennan <rbrennan@...> wrote:
At 08:05 AM 4/15/2020, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>All decals should be compared to good photos! Even a lazy vendor
>sometimes gets them right
>or perhaps partly right. I once tried to DOCUMENT my older decals
>including all of the small
>bits in each set and I found a few real gems, a lot of not so good,
>and plenty of "you've got
>to be kidding me!" I gave up after a while because it was so time consuming.

Tim has captured the issue:
- You can make a decal set that is exactly correct for ONE car...
- You can make a set that is relatively correct for a number of cars...
- You can put together a herald and some letters/numbers and call it a decal

...and if you really want to find the 'howlers';
Get out your magnifying glass and read the re-weigh data and other
fine print (if it exists) on your pad-printed RTR cars!!!


Richard
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Richard Brennan - TT-west
----------------------------------------------------------------------------






--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Striker Castings

Brian Stokes
 

The Southern document does look very much like what is in the 1919 CBC drawing but in much better and more legible detail. 

Sounds like it really depends on the builder and road - and unfortunately, I haven't found any info on who built the El Paso & Southwestern gons yet. 
This gives me a good place to start though, between the drawing and the opposite side detail photos that David linked to. 

Bob, I'd love to get some of those drawings so I can detail the doors once they are available.

Thanks all! 

--
Brian Stokes
https://northpoint48.blogspot.com/


Re: Speaking of decals

Gary Bechdol
 

Fenton:  

I ordered several sets of ACL steam locomotive decals from K4.  I had twp locomotive professionally painted, but when the painter applied the white decals, the printing was so thin that the decal did not show up on the black locomotives.  Even doubling up the decals did not help.  Maybe I had an early set, but before you try decaling a car, do a test first on a piece of scrap using the paint color you are applying to the car.

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA

On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 12:30 PM O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:
By the way has anyone used the K4 decals out of Dayton OH. I stumbled across them on eBay and ordered about 10 different sets.  They have some nice C&NJ, ACL( a surprising variety of ACL) and others including some interesting private tank cars that I needed for future projects.  I haven't use them yet but they are pretty crisply printed and look good on paper.  I'll et you know when I do the ACL or C&NJ cars coming up in my build shop. 
If anyone has used them let me know what you think
Fenton

On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 12:21 PM Richard Brennan <rbrennan@...> wrote:
At 08:05 AM 4/15/2020, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>All decals should be compared to good photos! Even a lazy vendor
>sometimes gets them right
>or perhaps partly right. I once tried to DOCUMENT my older decals
>including all of the small
>bits in each set and I found a few real gems, a lot of not so good,
>and plenty of "you've got
>to be kidding me!" I gave up after a while because it was so time consuming.

Tim has captured the issue:
- You can make a decal set that is exactly correct for ONE car...
- You can make a set that is relatively correct for a number of cars...
- You can put together a herald and some letters/numbers and call it a decal

...and if you really want to find the 'howlers';
Get out your magnifying glass and read the re-weigh data and other
fine print (if it exists) on your pad-printed RTR cars!!!


Richard
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Richard Brennan - TT-west
----------------------------------------------------------------------------






--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Photo: Painting New Refrigerator Cars At PACCAR Factory

Andy Cich
 

Ted Culotta’s Prototype Railroad Modeling – Volume Four has an extensive article on kitbashing the R-40-14.  http://speedwitchmedia.com/product/prototype-railroad-modeling-volume-four/

 

The kitbash basically consists of Intermountain parts and modified Details West ends. Stan’s kit probably had castings of the modified ends. Anyway, the article is probably useful for building Stan’s kit as well as doing the kitbash.

 

 

Andy Cich

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 11:53 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Painting New Refrigerator Cars At PACCAR Factory

 

PFE R40-14. Which is basically an R40-10 with "W" corner posts/rounf corners, right?  I have an HO kit for one from Stan Rydarowwicz that I pulley's doff the shelf to look at just last week!

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Ken Adams
 

One good thing from this discussion, I will be exploring Spruebrothers as another option for tools and paints. 

We may not realize how much we have in common with the military/aircraft model hobbies. 

I am still a big Tamiya fan as apartment/condo style living does not allow for air brushing and temporary (when the wind is right) set ups for an air brush on the balcony have not worked for me.  Fine nozzles, close up spraying and a cut up cardboard box wind break have become an option that works. Then again I just used the old standby "Future" for gloss surface for decal application and Tamiya clear matte for the subsequent flat overcoat.


--
Ken Adams

Modeling SP Early 1950's in the Walnut Creak...


Re: Unusual trucks on gon in American Smelting photo

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Even the scrap is interesting.  Truck side frames and a pile of Bettendorf center sills!
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of spsalso via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 11:11 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unusual trucks on gon in American Smelting photo

Dennis,

Thanks for doing a test-run on my process.  Of course, the result would imply that the adjacent truck on the hopper would also have a 6' - 6" wheelbase, since you demonstrated that they match.

While the journals, wheel faces, and car sides aren't in the same plane, they're pretty close in this picture.  I'm guessing the car is at least 500' from the photographer.  The difference in distance from the car side to the wheel face is 2 1/2 feet.  So the "correction factor" would be .005.

And the car angle isn't so far off that the proportions of the dimensions of interest would not still be linear.  I think.  As the "length" of the car side shrinks with rotation, so does the "length" of the wheelbase.  Proportionally.

My continued re-examination of this photo has revealed to me a steam locomotive cab, in the foreground, that appears to be used for a warm-weather break room (no heat, covered windows).  And judging by the remaining snow, warm weather is still in the future.

A wonderful photograph.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

HI Ben,
 
Thanks for informing me, I will have a look
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 1:13 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can
 
Claus Schlund wrote:
"To which I say – thank goodness this is no longer possible! I often use isopropyl alcohol when applying weathering watercolor paints, and the isopropyl alcohol used to react with Dullcote and yield a chalky colored finish, even when I allowed time for a long-term curing of the Dullcote for weeks. This is typically what I did NOT want for most freight cars. While I agree it can be an asset in some specialized cases, it was typically a problem for me."

You do realize this process is controllable, right?  Mike Rose wrote several articles and filmed how-to videos on how to use this effect on more recent rolling stock, showing how to both apply and reverse the effect.
 
Ben Hom


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Benjamin Hom
 

Claus Schlund wrote:
"To which I say – thank goodness this is no longer possible! I often use isopropyl alcohol when applying weathering watercolor paints, and the isopropyl alcohol used to react with Dullcote and yield a chalky colored finish, even when I allowed time for a long-term curing of the Dullcote for weeks. This is typically what I did NOT want for most freight cars. While I agree it can be an asset in some specialized cases, it was typically a problem for me."

You do realize this process is controllable, right?  Mike Rose wrote several articles and filmed how-to videos on how to use this effect on more recent rolling stock, showing how to both apply and reverse the effect.

Ben Hom 


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Bob and List Members,
 
Bob wrote: “One trick I used to be able to do with Dullcote was to spray gray cement hoppers with it and then spray 70 percent isopropyl alcohol on the hopper a few minutes later. When dry this produced a nice chalky base from which to do further weathering. This no longer is possible.”
 
To which I say – thank goodness this is no longer possible! I often use isopropyl alcohol when applying weathering watercolor paints, and the isopropyl alcohol used to react with Dullcote and yield a chalky colored finish, even when I allowed time for a long-term curing of the Dullcote for weeks. This is typically what I did NOT want for most freight cars. While I agree it can be an asset in some specialized cases, it was typically a problem for me.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 11:25 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can
 
As far as rattle cans go, I'm with Nelson on this: Tamiya and sometimes Krylon. Tamiya gives a finer spray compared to Dullcote and Model Masters.
The formula for Dullcote apparently was altered a few years ago and the current formula just doesn't seem to produce the same quality finish or as much "tooth" for weathering.
One trick I used to be able to do with Dullcote was to spray gray cement hoppers with it and then spray 70 percent isopropyl alcohol on the hopper a few minutes later. When dry this produced a nice chalky base from which to do further weathering. This no longer is possible.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Painting New Refrigerator Cars At PACCAR Factory

Bruce Smith
 

PFE R40-14. Which is basically an R40-10 with "W" corner posts/rounf corners, right?  I have an HO kit for one from Stan Rydarowwicz that I pulley's doff the shelf to look at just last week!

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 10:38 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Painting New Refrigerator Cars At PACCAR Factory
 

Photo: Painting New Refrigerator Cars At PACCAR Factory

A 1941 photo from the University of Washington Digital Archives:

https://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/digital/collection/imlsmohai/id/5747/rec/6

Description: "Pacific Car and Foundry (later called PACCAR) originally made its name building railroad cars for the logging industry. Between 1920 and 1939, the firm's sales of railroad cars dropped from 88% of its business to only 4%. This changed in 1941 when the Pacific Fruit Express Company ordered 1,000 refrigerated freight cars from Pacific Car. In August 1941, the mile-long assembly line turned out a finished car every 40 minutes.

In this August 1941 photo, taken at the Pacific Car and Foundry railroad car plant, workmen paint the refrigerated cars ordered by Pacific Fruit Express."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: GM&O and A&WP colors

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

    You can add B&M, NH and Rutland to your list of black gons for our era, Bill

Cordially, Don Valentine


Atlas 50' Postwar AAR Box Cars

Ed Hawkins
 

STMFC Members,
Recent discussion on the STMFC has included postwar AAR 50’ box cars having a straight side sill reinforcement extending end to end for connecting the bolsters, crossbearers, and crossties.

An original Branchline Trains model that was appropriate for NYC having the side sill reinforcement extending from bolster to bolster was also used incorrectly for box car models of the following railroads having 8’ door openings, diagonal panel roof, riveted sides with 16 side sheets (8 on each side of the door), and Improved Dreadnaught ends of two variants built in 1950-1954 or 1955 & later. 

Erie 63000-63199, 200 cars, built Erie-Dunmore ca. 3-54 (various series re# 1954-1956)
GAEX 100000-112009, 339 cars built GATC late 1950, leased to various railroads
NP 31000-31499, 500 cars built NP-Brainerd ca. 9-50
NP 1100-1295, former 31000-31499 196 re# cars ca. 1954-1957, DF, painted green
T&P 71800-71859, 60 cars built T&P-Marshall 4-56, plus 31 additional cars 74134-74172 (not inclusive)

Other similar cars came having a straight side sill reinforcement came with Z-U diagonal panel roofs.

C&S 900-924, 25 cars built CB&Q-Havelock in 8-58
CB&Q 23000-23099, 100 cars built CB&Q-Havelock ca. 9-55

Models offered to date can be modified by filling in 4 notches (2 per side), however, that requires matching paint on painted models.

Several years ago Atlas was contacted with a proposal for tooling a pair of truly straight end-to-end side sill reinforcement inserts that would be correct for the above cars (i.e., without any notches). At the time Atlas contacted their Chinese supplier as to the cost of the tooling & indicated the cost would be minimal. However, to date, the tooling has not been produced. It’s apparent that Atlas might need some additional encouragement from STMFC modelers. 

In addition to the above-mentioned as-built cars, there would also be a number of repaints to include some beyond the scope of the STMFC.

Modelers interested in supporting Atlas to produce RTR models having the full-length side sill reinforcement should contact Atlas by completing a request at https://shop.atlasrr.com/contactus.aspx

Regards,
Ed Hawkins




Re: Speaking of decals

O Fenton Wells
 

By the way has anyone used the K4 decals out of Dayton OH. I stumbled across them on eBay and ordered about 10 different sets.  They have some nice C&NJ, ACL( a surprising variety of ACL) and others including some interesting private tank cars that I needed for future projects.  I haven't use them yet but they are pretty crisply printed and look good on paper.  I'll et you know when I do the ACL or C&NJ cars coming up in my build shop. 
If anyone has used them let me know what you think
Fenton

On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 12:21 PM Richard Brennan <rbrennan@...> wrote:
At 08:05 AM 4/15/2020, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>All decals should be compared to good photos! Even a lazy vendor
>sometimes gets them right
>or perhaps partly right. I once tried to DOCUMENT my older decals
>including all of the small
>bits in each set and I found a few real gems, a lot of not so good,
>and plenty of "you've got
>to be kidding me!" I gave up after a while because it was so time consuming.

Tim has captured the issue:
- You can make a decal set that is exactly correct for ONE car...
- You can make a set that is relatively correct for a number of cars...
- You can put together a herald and some letters/numbers and call it a decal

...and if you really want to find the 'howlers';
Get out your magnifying glass and read the re-weigh data and other
fine print (if it exists) on your pad-printed RTR cars!!!


Richard
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Richard Brennan - TT-west
----------------------------------------------------------------------------






--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Speaking of decals

Richard Brennan
 

At 08:05 AM 4/15/2020, Tim O'Connor wrote:
All decals should be compared to good photos! Even a lazy vendor sometimes gets them right
or perhaps partly right. I once tried to DOCUMENT my older decals including all of the small
bits in each set and I found a few real gems, a lot of not so good, and plenty of "you've got
to be kidding me!" I gave up after a while because it was so time consuming.
Tim has captured the issue:
- You can make a decal set that is exactly correct for ONE car...
- You can make a set that is relatively correct for a number of cars...
- You can put together a herald and some letters/numbers and call it a decal

...and if you really want to find the 'howlers';
Get out your magnifying glass and read the re-weigh data and other fine print (if it exists) on your pad-printed RTR cars!!!


Richard
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Richard Brennan - TT-west
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

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