Date   

PFE R30/40-50-18;19;21 reefers

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-

So long ago.....I had placed my order for Dick Harley's tooling produced PFE reefers in the R-30-18 class. Tooling was built years ago by Terry Wegmann. The cars are built and marketed by Intermountain RR Co.

I looked and can't quickly find requests for cars from me. Anyone on this list remember ordering these cars from me? I may cancel my order if no one remembers.

These cars are to be shipped to dealers this month.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson   Ojai CA


Re: GCSX Flat Car [was Barriger Library AC&F Photos]

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Hold on Schuyler!  I did not say granite on Rutland flat cars. The proper load is MARBLE!  The west
side of the Green Mountains in Vermont , in other words Rutland territory, is primarily dolomitic rock
or slate further west along the New York border and Lake Champlain. In the main stem of the Green
Mountains and on their eastern slopes is where the granite is found along with copper, though the 
latter is no longer mined. For Vermont granite loading I'm going to suggest either Barre & Chelsea flat 
cars of the #700 to #749 group, the decks of which were 42 ft., 1 in in length and 9 ft. 2 in. wide, or you 
could use Boston & Main flat cars from the #33501 to #33796 group that with decks of the same 
dimensions. 

Hard to believe but by the time the Connecticut & Passumpsic Rivers RR was completed from White
River Jct. to Newport, VT, together with is subsidiary the Massawippi Valley Railroad from Newport to
Lennoxville, PQ with trackage rights into Sherbrooke, PQ, by the early 1870's copper was being mined
at three points between White River and Lennoxville with all of this trackage becoming Boston & Maine
territory by the 1890's. These were Pompanoosic, and Ely in Vermont and Capleton, PQ with ample 
evidence of it's loading still present at the 1st and 3rd location. they having lasted the longest. That 
said I believe the concentrated ore that was shipped from all three points was always bagged and
shipped in box cars as I have been told it was from Pompanoosic where it was still being loaded and 
shipped in bags until the Elizabeth Mine closed in 1958. So there's and interesting commodity from 
this region shipped by rain but nit in a way that makes it such and interesting load as marble or 
granite chained on a flat car.

 


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: PRR BoxcarA photo for the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16614coll41/id/23/rec/363

Description: "Photo of an XM type boxcar, an American Railroad Administration model that was used as the basis for the second type of Pullman troop transport."

      As is very often true, museums and archives really have no idea what they are talking about (the caption may well have been written by an intern or volunteer). It's obviously a USRA box car and no doubt the many PRR-kknowledgeable folks on this list will have a LOT to say <g>.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar

Brian Carlson
 

Who writes these captions?  Also, I find it odd that the Illinois Library system is reposting a photo that is on the steam era freight cars website. Looking back at the original post I don’t see Illinois having any claim to the photo ??? 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Apr 22, 2020, at 2:37 PM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Well, they got two letters correct in the description. This is one of the USRA boxcars assigned to the Pennsy. The car number if 45466 falls in with 2650 cars built by AC&F. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 22, 2020, at 1:33 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: PRR Boxcar

A photo for the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16614coll41/id/23/rec/363

Description: "Photo of an XM type boxcar, an American Railroad Administration model that was used as the basis for the second type of Pullman troop transport."

I'm guessing the car number is 15466 but I'll let you folks with better monitors decipher the number.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar

Bruce Smith
 

And as far as I know, absolutely nothing to do with any sort of troop car.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Apr 22, 2020, at 1:40 PM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Photo: PRR Boxcar

A photo for the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16614coll41/id/23/rec/363 

Description: "Photo of an XM type boxcar, an American Railroad Administration model that was used as the basis for the second type of Pullman troop transport."

I'm guessing the car number is 15466 but I'll let you folks with better monitors decipher the number."

PRR 45466, Class X26, from PRR 44001-46725.  Total of 9900 cars spread across multiple series due to initial assignment to Lines East, Lines West, and subsidiaries.  This car exhibits mid-1930s upgrades, including upgraded roof, doors, and truss reinforcements.


Ben Hom 




Re: Help with Assorted Freight Car Truck Colors

Ken Adams
 

Post war SP freight car trucks may have been painted/repainted SP "Metallic" BCR fresh out of the car shop but within 3 months or less they appeared to be a dusty dark grey streaked with rust.  

I have found Tamiya XF-84 Dark Iron to be a good general base paint for truck color. Blagdon Weathering Powder rust color brushed on after the paint is dry gives a reddish tone that may have been the remains of the paint or true rust. 
--
Ken Adams
In splendid Shelter In Place solitude

About half way up Walnut Creek


Interior Photo: Pullman-Standard Compartmentizer Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Interior Photo: Pullman-Standard Compartmentizer Boxcar

A 1953 builder's photo from the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/pshs/id/21210/rec/195

A very clear photo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar

Dave Parker
 

And, not exactly a new find since there is a link below to the very same photo over on the old steamerafreightcars.com site.

Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar

Benjamin Hom
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Photo: PRR Boxcar

A photo for the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16614coll41/id/23/rec/363 

Description: "Photo of an XM type boxcar, an American Railroad Administration model that was used as the basis for the second type of Pullman troop transport."

I'm guessing the car number is 15466 but I'll let you folks with better monitors decipher the number."

PRR 45466, Class X26, from PRR 44001-46725.  Total of 9900 cars spread across multiple series due to initial assignment to Lines East, Lines West, and subsidiaries.  This car exhibits mid-1930s upgrades, including upgraded roof, doors, and truss reinforcements.


Ben Hom 



Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar

Eric Hansmann
 

Well, they got two letters correct in the description. This is one of the USRA boxcars assigned to the Pennsy. The car number if 45466 falls in with 2650 cars built by AC&F. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 22, 2020, at 1:33 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: PRR Boxcar

A photo for the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16614coll41/id/23/rec/363

Description: "Photo of an XM type boxcar, an American Railroad Administration model that was used as the basis for the second type of Pullman troop transport."

I'm guessing the car number is 15466 but I'll let you folks with better monitors decipher the number.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: PRR Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Boxcar

A photo for the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16614coll41/id/23/rec/363

Description: "Photo of an XM type boxcar, an American Railroad Administration model that was used as the basis for the second type of Pullman troop transport."

I'm guessing the car number is 15466 but I'll let you folks with better monitors decipher the number.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: GCSX Flat Car [was Barriger Library AC&F Photos]

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Apr 22, 2020 at 10:22 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
I noted that the examples above do not have AAR standard reporting marks, indicating that they were strictly for on-base use.
Interesting that they are all equipped with slotted knuckles.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Help with decals

Ken Adams
 

I had to use some old Champ decals recently which required Solvset full strength.

Of course I am averse to air brushing anything so the pre-decal gloss coat was brushed on Future (now marketed as Pledge "revive it" floor gloss.) It works for me......
--
Ken Adams
In Mandated Solitude About half way up Walnut Creek


Re: Walthers 40' gon

John Larkin
 

If still available (great price) I'll cut you a check or if it's close just send cash.

John Larkin

On Wednesday, April 22, 2020, 12:06:06 PM CDT, Hugh Guillaume via groups.io <mguill1224@...> wrote:


That is the kit that I have.  I have chosen not to build it.  I will send it to anyone who will cover the cost of priority mail.  HTG


Re: Rebuilt Double sheathed boxcars using Youngstown Steel wi

James Brewer
 

Eric,

It did come through to me; I have downloaded and been looking through it.  Quite a bit of work on your part.  Thank you!

Jim Brewer


Re: Help with decals

Jim King
 

Noted modeller, Bob Harpe, told me years ago that he uses 2 strengths of Solvaset.  1 is a mix of 40% Solvaset, 40% distilled water and 20% isopropyl alcohol.  I don’t use distilled water because our city water has never given me issues with fogging, etc.  I know some areas have “dirty” water and distilled, bottled water is the best option.

 

The other is full-strength Solvaset.  I have a bottle of each and use the greatly thinned brew when first applying decals.  Its dilution gives me enough time to move into position with a toothpick or broken-tipped #11 blade.  Once the decal dries, I switch to full-strength Solvaset to finish it. 

 

If the painted surface has sufficient gloss and I put enough thinned Solvaset on that spot, even with rivets, it usually takes just a couple applications of full-strength to get everything to nestle well.  I have Microsol bottles but rarely use them once I got used to the 2-step Solvaset process.

 

Jim King

http://smokymountainmodelworks.com/

 


Re: GCSX Flat Car [was Barriger Library AC&F Photos]

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks for your research and response, Ed.  You’re a valuable resource!

 


Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ed Hawkins
Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2020 12:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GCSX Flat Car [was Barriger Library AC&F Photos]

 

 



On Apr 22, 2020, at 10:18 AM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

 

I’m glad to have Don Valentine’s info about the use of the Rutland cars to haul granite blocks, so I can justify using one on my (future) ERIE layout . . . but I’m wondering if Ed Hawkins can answer the question out of the ACF records, whether the drawings for these cars (assuming they’re in the collection) show any other railroad users?

 

Schuyler,

The ACF drawing collection at the National Museum of Transportation has 4 drawings that pertain to lot 2551. All are dated in the range July-October 1942. 

 

31-3812 Lettering Diagram (also applies to lot 2558 GSCX ash transfer cars)

41-3419 Steel Details (also applies to lots 2544, 2552)

61-3594 General Arrangement (also applies to lots 2520, 2552)

61-3595 Brake Arrangement

 

The Barriger Flickr web site also has photos for related lots 2544 (U.S. Navy), 2552 (U.S. Coast Guard), and 2520 Nicaro Nickel Co. (Defense Plant order). 

 

If interested in obtaining copies/digital scans of any drawings, contact Teresa Militello, curator of the NMOT library at tma.teresa2@.... Keep in mind that at this time the NMOT is closed due to coronavirus restrictions.

 

Regards,

Ed Hawkins

 

 


Re: Rebuilt Double sheathed boxcars using Youngstown Steel wi

Eric Lombard
 

Well, I see that the attached file on yesterday's post is not available in our current arrangement. 
Email me if you are interested in the spreadsheet of steel-sided rebuilds and I will get one off to you.

Eric L


Re: GCSX Flat Car [was Barriger Library AC&F Photos]

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Don and friends,

Coast Guard Yard: https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49618643298/in/album-72157649155982802/  and end view at https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49619163361/in/album-72157649155982802/ (note the interesting coupler cut rod arrangement!)




One wonders how many of these 11-pocket flats were built for the government. Perhaps this was a standard military design, and the GCSX car sort of "leaked out". I noted that the examples above do not have AAR standard reporting marks, indicating that they were strictly for on-base use. As restricted cars and in small lots, they aren't of much use to us, but still interesting.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Apr 22, 2020 at 9:54 AM Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Garth and others,

    Lets not overook the "Coast Guard Yard flat car in the same grop of photos that was also
constructed in anuary 1943. The more we look I suspect the more we will find with 11 stake
pockets per side. I'm also wondering if the late Al Armatige mght have been the person behind
the Athearn flat car model havin worked with or for Athearn at one point and being from New
England himself. Anyone have any thoughts on this? I've never foud the source of any drawings
used to produce the model but know many other wjo are as happy as I am that Athern chose a
Rutland prototype to model. Given the use of marble as a building material and with Howe Scale
being located adjacent the Rutland's home yard in Rutland, Vt. there is reasonable justification 
for any modeler to have one of these Rutland flat cars on their model pike.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Bridge Girder On Flat Cars

Kemal Mumcu
 

You make an interesting observation Bruce. Looking through other photos of these cars I see some have the plate and others don't. It seems that the lower numbered cars have the plate and the higher numbers don't. Another reason to build one of each. ;)

The CP ran many many revenue earning cars into the 1950s on arch bar trucks. The company spanned sea to sea and most trips wouldn't need to ever leave home rails.

Colin

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