Date   

Re: early CBQ cars

Rupert Gamlen
 

Claus

Thanks for this link but I think it may be too old for some members.

Box car 26519 was built by Wells & French in 1891 (26503-26753), while 26259 behind it (if that is the correct number) was built the same year by Missouri Car & Foundry (26003-26502). Both were 34’ cars, and I think the light panel at the top of the side doors announces that they were equipped with air brakes. Both cars would be placed in class XM-3 when the company introduced classes in 1910-11.

The Burlington Route herald on the side of 26259 has the initials “CB&QRR” underneath, a practice which disappeared about the end of the century. Other companies within the Burlington group used the same herald but with their own initials.

The car to the left beyond the gondola (listed as a “coal car” up to 1905) is a Chicago & Iowa box car probably built in about 1880, with an inside length of 27’ 5
½”. The company was leased to the Burlington on 1 January 1892 but the equipment was no longer listed in ORER’s by March 1894, which may help date the photo. The cars were renumbered variously as CB&Q 9564-9958 and the last one of this group survived until 1912.

If anyone can more accurately date the end use of company initials under the Burlington Route herald, I would be grateful to hear from them.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, 24 April 2020 11:19 am
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] early CBQ cars

 


Re: boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

Andy Miller
 

There is an interesting feature about this.  Unlike box cars which had sliding doors, Reefers had double leaf swing doors needed to seal the car air tight.  That is why the doors were only 4’ wide. (well the SFRD were 5’) Any wider and they could not be loaded or unloaded on parallel tracks.   One of the great developments of WWII was the forklift truck.  It soon became the preferred way to unload box cars, but most forklifts would not fit though a 4’ door!   That’s why plug doors rapidly became standard on reefers after the war.

 

For the longest time no one made a 40’ plug door, iced reefer in HO.  So I kitbashed  them.  After I did about a dozen, Accurail came out with theirs – the story of my model RRing life.

 

Regards,

 

Andy Miller

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Andy Jackson
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 8:03 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

Los Angles Produce Terminal arrangement, but their 12 tracks were at an angle. Reefers could be unloaded 3 at a time using bridge plates between far 2. There was always one against a dock, 36 cars could be unloaded at the same time.

Andy Jackson

Santa Fe Springs CA


Re: boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

Richard McQuade
 

I spent 2 summers in the big CPR freight sheds in Lambton Yard in Toronto. The bridge plates were used on a lot of the cars. The shed was long and cars were always beside each other on adjacent tracks because some destinations like Montreal Pool and Montreal Eaton's would load 2 or more cars with the outside car loaded first then the inside car because there was a lot of freight going there every day without exception. I seem to recall that they were at the west end of the shed where the switch lead was because it made more sense to have them at that end then to have them buried up against the track bumpers at the far (east) end of the freight shed. There were two shifts - "graveyard" (1130pm-8am) and day shift (8am-4:30pm). All cars had to be closed at the end of the day shift so that they could be shunted between 4:30-11:30pm. Some cars wouldn't be fully loaded but had to have bulkheads nailed inside to keep the load from shifting while the yard crew banged them around. If a car was loaded it was sealed at the end of the shift but semi-loaded cars just had their doors closed and latched. On a model railroad a large freight shed could keep a crew busy for a whole shift because loaded cars needed to be switched out and replaced with empty cars and  semi-loaded cars had to be moved then brought back to their proper loading docks. That meant that not all cars on the inside track (closest to the shed) would be dragged out and sent away but that some would be and replaced with empties and some wouldn't be. Inbound freight to Toronto went to the King St. freight shed downtown. After those cars were unloaded and yarded they were sent up to us to be loaded. We didn't unload boxcars at Lambton, only loaded them from trucks that brought the freight to the shed.
Richard


Re: Weathering powder binder

Aley, Jeff A
 

Rumor is that it’s makeup – same stuff that is used in cosmetics.  What that stuff is, is an off-topic exercise for the reader 😊

 

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 4:18 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Weathering powder binder

 

Do you have any idea what Bragdon's adhesive might be?

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Apr 23, 2020 3:28 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Weathering powder binder

My understanding is that Bragdon’s has an adhesive mixed in which is activated by pressure. Rubbing the powder generates the required pressure.

 

To my knowledge no other weathering powders have any kind of binder or adhesive.

 

Doug  Harding

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 5:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Weathering powder binder

 

Can anyone tell me what the binder is in weathering powders? What is the substance that makes the powders stick when rubbed? Onto a steam era freight car.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

 


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: WP Boxcar 20807A 1951 builder's photo from the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/pshs/id/21885/rec/170

Silver car with "Rides Like A Feather" logo.


    Ah, yes, the famous silver "feather" cars. There must be several thousand models in existence for every car that was on the prototype.

Tony Thompson




Re: boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

Los Angles Produce Terminal arrangement, but their 12 tracks were at an angle. Reefers could be unloaded 3 at a time using bridge plates between far 2. There was always one against a dock, 36 cars could be unloaded at the same time.
Andy Jackson
Santa Fe Springs CA


Re: former VGN cars?

gary laakso
 

More likely C&IM gondolas that were akin to the VGN types.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 4:09 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] former VGN cars?

 

Hi List Members,

 

Are the six axle gons former VGN cars? If so, they are far from home.

 

 

More information can be found at the link below...

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund


Re: former VGN cars?

bongiovanni12001
 

Judging by the appearance of those cars and the date of the picture, they could very well be Virginian “battleship gons” that were sold by the railroad and used as storage bins or scrapped.  The railroad was decreasing the number of those cars in active service throughout the 1950s, and only a comparative few were left at the time of the merger with N&W. I believe the N&W got rid of the ones left within about 18 months.  

C&IM had some similar looking cars, but they were 70 ton cars on 4 wheel trucks, IIRC.

Frank Bongiovanni


Photo: Pullman Company Boxcar PLM X2023

Bob Chaparro
 
Edited

Photo: Pullman Company Boxcar PLM X2023

A 1940 builder's photo from the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/pshs/id/19536/rec/72
There are additional photos referenced to the right of the photo box.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Bob Chaparro
 
Edited

Photos: WP Boxcar 20807

1951 builder's photos from the Illinois Digital Archives:

http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/pshs/id/21885/rec/170

There is an additional photo referenced to the right of the photo box.

Silver car with "Rides Like A Feather" logo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: former VGN cars?

 

Didn’t C&IM have some battleship gons?

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Apr 23, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,
 
Are the six axle gons former VGN cars? If so, they are far from home.
 
 
More information can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


early CBQ cars

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Re: Weathering powder binder

Richard Townsend
 

Do you have any idea what Bragdon's adhesive might be?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Apr 23, 2020 3:28 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Weathering powder binder

My understanding is that Bragdon’s has an adhesive mixed in which is activated by pressure. Rubbing the powder generates the required pressure.
 
To my knowledge no other weathering powders have any kind of binder or adhesive.
 
Doug  Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org
 
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 5:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Weathering powder binder
 
Can anyone tell me what the binder is in weathering powders? What is the substance that makes the powders stick when rubbed? Onto a steam era freight car.
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 


Weight Of An Industrial Boiler?

Bob Chaparro
 

Weight Of An Industrial Boiler?

I have an HO scale Birchfield industrial fire tube boiler to use as a flat car or gondola load. It is a 3D printed model:

https://multiscale.digital/collections/ho-1-87/products/ho-scale-birchfield-industrial-fire-tube-boiler-flatcar-load

This is a very large boiler. It scales out at roughly 18 feet long, 13 feet high and 8 feet wide.

This photo shows as many as two of these large boilers and two smaller ones on a fifty-ton flat car:

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15644/rec/1807

Out of curiosity, what would one of these larger boilers weight?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


former VGN cars?

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Are the six axle gons former VGN cars? If so, they are far from home.
 
 
More information can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
At some industries, boxcars can be lined up on two tracks such that the far car is accessed by walking thru the near car and then across a steel plate serving as a bridge to get to the far car.
 
This can be seen nicely in he image below...
 
 
More information can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


Re: Weathering powder binder

Douglas Harding
 

My understanding is that Bragdon’s has an adhesive mixed in which is activated by pressure. Rubbing the powder generates the required pressure.

 

To my knowledge no other weathering powders have any kind of binder or adhesive.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 5:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Weathering powder binder

 

Can anyone tell me what the binder is in weathering powders? What is the substance that makes the powders stick when rubbed? Onto a steam era freight car.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

 


Re: B&O P-25D in HO

Bruce Griffin
 

Jim,

Great looking model.  Were these the cars modified for drywall loading?  

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

 


Re: B&O P-25D in HO

Jim Betz
 

Jim,

  Do you know why the decal film forms a 'shadow' around all of the 
lettering?  Did you decal after the weathering of the areas where
the decals are?  Lighting?  (Some times decals will reflect a flash
when without that intensity of light you don't see them.)

  It is not obtrusive - I think it is a great looking car and would be
happy to be able to say "I did this" of that car.

  Does any one know what service cars like this one were most
likely used in?  I'm referring to the low bulkhead ends.
                                                                                        - Jim


Weathering powder binder

Richard Townsend
 

Can anyone tell me what the binder is in weathering powders? What is the substance that makes the powders stick when rubbed? Onto a steam era freight car.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


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