Date   

Re: Cable Reel Loads

Guy Wilber
 

 Bruce Smith wrote: 


"I have some questions about Cable Reels as loads for steam era freight cars. 

I have a Sunshine PRR G27 gondola kit that was packaged with a kit for 18 steel cable reels. I model 1944. When did steel cable reels come into use?"


Previous to 1942 there was no specific diagram covering the loading of wire rope or cable (on reels).  In 1941, "at the request of shippers", the AAR's Loading Committee added Figure 75-B  to the Rules Governing The Loading of Commodities On Open Top Cars, effective March 1, 1942.  It would be appropriate for 1944 and is attached (as a pdf).  

   
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: Seeking Photo Help:

charles slater
 

Yes Bill I have been doing a lot of modeling.
Charlie

Sent from Outlook



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 11:01 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Seeking Photo Help:
 
Thanks Charley.  Just what I needed.  Hope all is going well with you in this new world we are living in.  Are you getting any modeling done?

Stay safe :

Bill



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: charles slater <atsfcondr42@...>
Date: 5/29/20 7:50 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: Bill Pardie <pardiew001@...>, main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Seeking Photo Help:

Here you are Bill, this should answer your question.
Charlie Slater

Sent from Outlook



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2020 6:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Seeking Photo Help:
 

I am looking for a photo that clearly shows the attachment of the lateral running boards on a Santa Fe Bx36 boxcar.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Photo: Unloading Gasoline

Dave Parker
 

Google is our friend.  It took a couple of steps, but that's an LOC FSA pic from WWII that you can find here:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsa/item/2017871450/

The 19 Mb TIFF version has a LOT more detail!

I defer to Steve Hile, but UTLX  19656 seems to be a bit of an oddball.  Steve's 1938 roster indicates these were early 6500-gal X-3 cars, that received new 8000-gal tanks ca. 1930.  Note the tank has four longitudinal  courses, which none of the "conventional" X-3s had.  This might explain the rather curious 1918 build date.

The two cars in front of 19656 both look like UTLX Class X (or XX) cars, 6500 gallons.

Great photo that I had not seen before; thanks for posting Bob.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: ATSF Mineral Brown

Ed Hawkins
 



On May 29, 2020, at 7:03 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Ed Hawkins' scan of ATSF paint samples from 1931 and 1945 (PPG) show a 'red shift'

STMFC,
To supplement Nelson’s point for cars built in the first group that follows, the ACF bills of materials for a number of Santa Fe freight cars built from 1931 to 1944 are consistently the same shade of Mineral Brown. The hue is a dark shade of brown with a flat finish. The equivalent Tru-Color paint number is TCP-19. These documents for equipment built by ACF from lot 1200 (1931) to lots in the upper 3600s (1952) are at the Barriger National Railroad Library. Not all ACF bills of materials have paint samples, however, ATSF had more than most railroads.

Lot 1200, 1931 Bx-13
Lot 1607, 1937 Bx-27
Lot 1973, 1940 Ga-50 Hart ballast
Lot 1974, 1940 Ga-49 gondola
Lot 2163, 1941 Ga-56 Hart ballast
Lot 2674, 1944 Ga-59 Hart ballast

The 2nd group of Santa Fe cars having paint samples in the ACF bills of materials are from late 1948 to 1951. These also specify “Mineral Brown but of a red-brown hue and medium gloss finish. 

Lot 3286, Jan. 1949, Ga-67 covered hopper
Lot 3287, Apr. 1949, Ga-68 gondola
Lot 3333, May 1949, Ga-69 gondola
Lot 3334, Aug. 1949, Ga-74 Hart ballast
Lot 3335, Dec. 1948, Ga-73 triple hopper
Lot 3550, July 1951, Ga-80 gondola

The color is a close match to the old Floquil RR74 “Boxcar Red” that was sold in a bottle with square corners & a common color used by numerous railroads in the postwar years. 

For the Santa Fe postwar freight cars the ACF bills of materials typically specified “synthentic” Mineral Brown from Pittsburgh, Sherwin-Williams, and Glidden. While in general the postwar Santa Fe lots were no longer the dark shade of Mineral Brown, there were some variations in the red-brown shades when comparing them side by side.  Tru-Color offers a number of paint numbers that are a reasonably-close match to the postwar ATSF Mineral Brown: TCP-188, 193, 197, 202, 210, 213-214, 216, 217, 220-223. 234-235, 237-245.

I’m curious if there exists any Bowles color drift cards for ATSF Mineral Brown from the steam era. These drift cards have dates & should reflect the change of shade from the prewar years, World War II years, and postwar years. The only ATSF Mineral Brown Bowles color drift card I’ve seen is dated Feb. 1963. For what it’s worth the Feb. 1963 drift card is a lighter red-brown shade than lot 3286 & any of the postwar ATSF paint samples. 

Hope this helps.
Ed Hawkins





Re: Photo: Unloading Gasoline

Bill J.
 

AMAZING!  I can't see the pump to move gas fro car to can.  Siphoning?!

Bill Jolitz


Re: Seeking Photo Help:

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Thanks Charley.  Just what I needed.  Hope all is going well with you in this new world we are living in.  Are you getting any modeling done?

Stay safe :

Bill



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: charles slater <atsfcondr42@...>
Date: 5/29/20 7:50 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: Bill Pardie <pardiew001@...>, main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Seeking Photo Help:

Here you are Bill, this should answer your question.
Charlie Slater

Sent from Outlook



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2020 6:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Seeking Photo Help:
 

I am looking for a photo that clearly shows the attachment of the lateral running boards on a Santa Fe Bx36 boxcar.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Photo: MC Automobile Boxcar 93033

Dave Parker
 

These are what Al called the NYCL's "1916 design".  Jeff English's summary of the NYCL box cars says 6500 all-steel cars total, all of them with 1-1/2 doors, some with end doors.  Most were originally MCRR cars, and a very quick glance at the Canada Southern roster suggests 2000 were originally NYC.  I didn't tease the data apart, but it looks like a large fraction of the MCRR cars were renumbered to NYC cars, 1942-49.  So, you'd need to look in both ORER listings to find the survivors ca. 1950.  I don't think they were rebuilt much (if at all), but some may have been reclassed as XMs.

These are very cool cars;  I have one of the Westy kits in my stash.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Seeking Photo Help:

charles slater
 

Here you are Bill, this should answer your question.
Charlie Slater

Sent from Outlook



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2020 6:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Seeking Photo Help:
 

I am looking for a photo that clearly shows the attachment of the lateral running boards on a Santa Fe Bx36 boxcar.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

Schuyler Larrabee
 

So ‘tis.  Thanks, Ben.

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 1:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

 

Schuyler Larrabee asked:
"Looking for confirmation: Are those X29s?" 
https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p15037coll3/id/49797/rec/1204 

 

Yes.  The X29 class marking can be clearly seen when you enlarge the photo.

 

 

Ben Hom


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

Benjamin Hom
 

Schuyler Larrabee asked:
"Looking for confirmation: Are those X29s?" 
https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p15037coll3/id/49797/rec/1204 

Yes.  The X29 class marking can be clearly seen when you enlarge the photo.


Ben Hom


Re: ATSF Mineral Brown

John Moore
 

I could not find Tru Scale model railroad paint as mentioned in the message string.  I could find Tru Color model railroad paint.  I believe that is the paint being referred to.

John in Albuquerque  -- --
okladivjohn@...


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Looking for confirmation: Are those X29s?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 12:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

 

Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

A 1942 photo from the Temple University Libraries:

https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p15037coll3/id/49797/rec/1204

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Note the four quadrant switch crew chalk marking near the grab iron. This is a typical pattern with a "+" sign with a letter or number code for the location, shift, carman and "ok" in the four quadrants.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Cable Reel Loads

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Well, the point of my inquiry was about the markings (decals) that Bruce has.  Do they cover both steel cable (or as Bruce pointed out, wire rope) AND electrical cables?  IOW, what would he be winding on the reels?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 12:30 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Schuyler,

 

I was talking about REELS capable of handling either steel cable or wire like used in communications.  Both are quite heavy.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 12:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Clarity, please . . .

 

Are we talking about reels of steel CABLE or reels of WIRE?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 10:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Bruce,

 

This isn’t the answer you are looking for but it might start you in the correct direction.  Steel cable reels were alive and well in the 1970’s when I hauled them.  What I saw ranged from 6,000 to 15,000 lbs. with wire on them.

 

It seems like anything less than 5,000 lbs. was prime for wooden reels.

 

Steel reels were always returned empty.  The wooden ones not so much, but some really good ones were returned.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 9:29 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Folks,

 

I have some questions about Cable Reels as loads for steam era freight cars. 

 

I have a Sunshine PRR G27 gondola kit that was packaged with a kit for 18 steel cable reels. I model 1944. When did steel cable reels come into use?

 

This kit has a nice set of decals for cable reel labels, but when I search GOOGLE, all the steel reels seem to have very little labeling. Indeed, it looks like it might be tough to apply the decals to these reels anyway, since they have ribs on the outside and the only photo photo I have seen with a label (Okonite), has it on a placard attached to the ribs. Were steel cable reels commonly labeled in the steam era? Photos? 

 

If the decals don't work for the steel reels, I'll repurpose them for the wood reels I have. The decal set included is pretty comprehensive and amazing. Are there other decal sets to label cable reels?

 

Regards,

Bruce 

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Tangent GATC 8,000 Gallon 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Car

Tangent Scale Models
 

Tangent Scale Models is proud to introduce our next production of General American 8,000 Gallon 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Cars.  As a reminder, this is the first plastic radial course tank offered in HO plastic!  (Radial course means the tank’s steel panels overlap each other, looking like “stairsteps”).

 

By the end of World War I, U.S. production of oil and oil-related products was sharply increasing thanks to the combination of war-related demands as well as demands from home.  In order to move oil and new consumer products, tank car producers introduced new car designs.  In 1917 General American Tank Car introduced a new general service 8,000 gallon non-insulated tank car.  Built in East Chicago, IN, these cars were easily identifiable by their circumferential rivets that surrounded the tank body, with notably different heights between the courses.  These “radial course” tank cars utilized steel bolster plates that rise up vertically to hold the tank in place, complete with a “web” section behind to minimize steel consumption.  At a time of fairly monochromatic box cars plying the rails, most consumable products and oil shippers proudly displayed their company markings on the tanks.  Additionally, tank car lessor firm Union Tank Line purchased a very large fleet of these cars as well, decorated in the distinctive UTLX “gold on black” scheme.  Between UTLX, Deep Rock, and other schemes to come in future releases, think of this as the first “crude oil” tank car of consequence.  The GATC 1917-design prototypes were the most prolific tank cars built during this period and were found everywhere from 1917 to roughly 1970. 

 

The Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-Design 8,000 Gallon General Service Tank Car is a highly-detailed tank car model that includes details accurate for each paint scheme, including KC- or AB-brake variations, with or without Cardwell draft sill springs, and different hand brakes.  Other visually-distinctive details for our models include the “see through” bolster section, circumferential rivets, and differing course heights.  Our RTR models include correct “true-to-life” colors and “hyper-accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement.  Finally, our scale replicas operate as well as they look, equipped with free-rolling all-metal wheels and Kadee® scale couplers, meaning our models are truly ready to run.  

           

Our new ready to operate replicas are in stock and available for sale NOW.  That’s right, no preorders!  Check them out by clicking here!

Whether wearing “plain” UTLX black lease colors or the colors of a lessee, these replicas will certainly be eye-catchers on your layout!  Check out the radial courses – they look like nothing else in HO!  Our May 2020 release includes the following four paint schemes:

 

- DMSX "Dunbar Molasses New Orleans 1919+" is our offering for the early steam-era modelers out there.  This model is offered in the attractive “Dunbar Molasses and Syrup Company” scheme with classy white stenciling on the side of the car.  Also, NEW ORLEANS, LA. is proudly stenciled on the car.  As always, this scheme comes directly off of a prototype car that matches our model.  Molasses was a common 8000 gallon tank car commodity even if it “sounds” unusual!  It was a core ingredient in foodstuffs, animal feed, vinegar, citric acid, etc.  Our Dunbar Molasses 1919+ cars come with era-correct K-brakes and are available in two road numbers.

 

- GATX " Union Starch and Refining Company 1950+" in the attractive “Union Starch and Refining Company – Quality Products From Corn” bright red scheme with accompanying white stenciling with black border.  These cars also feature “GRANITE CITY, ILLINOIS” spelled out.  This transition-era tank car is another great nationwide roamer, seen on all corners of the North American rail network hauling corn products. These models come with an AB brake system, and are available in four road numbers.

 

- UTLX "1926+ Lease" is one of two UTLX offerings in this production run: an “early” and a “later” car.  Union Tank Car Company’s UTLX lease fleet was comprised of tank cars from a variety of builders, including several large orders for GATC tank cars.  Numbering in the thousands, this fleet was part of the backbone of the large Standard Oil-owned fleet and are very relevant cars for those that need UTLX tanks – and more statistically relevant than the ACF prototypes you probably already have on your layout now (sorry, but it is true).  These nationwide service cars include a 1926 safety valve date, repack date, and paint date on the side of the car and underframe.  The car has appropriate and era-correct UTLX stenciling, and an era-correct K brake system.  This UTLX lease scheme is available in twelve road numbers.

 

- UTLX "Black Repaint 1958+" is the second of two UTLX offerings in this production run.  This scheme is the prototype repaint that was applied to UTLX cars in 1958.  The car also includes an era-appropriate AB brake system.  This UTLX lease scheme is available in six new road numbers for 2020.    
       

 

- Undecorated RTR Black cars are ready for decaling! 

 

- Undecorated Unpainted Kits are available as well.  When folks claim that “no one” makes kits anymore, well, here they are.  These are ready for building or kitbashing, and painting / decaling.  Great for those who desire to build their own. 

 

Features for these awesome replicas include:

- Circumferential riveted tank body and riveted underframe (count ‘em, there are many!)

- Radial course tank body – note the “stairstep” appearance!

- All-new underframe for the GATC 1917-design

- “See-through” cast knee above the bolsters

- Accurate dome appliances

- Dimensionally-correct hazardous placards with accurate hole detail

- Separately applied tank handrail

- Separately applied tank strap detail

- KC- or AB- brake variations depending on the prototype car

- Inclusion of Cardwell draft sill springs depending on the prototype car, otherwise “oval” frame openings where the springs were removed

- Different hand brake appliance options depending on the prototype car

- Highly correct “true to life” colors

- “Hyper-Accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement, including lettering applied to the underframe and air reservoir

- Durable wire grab irons and coupler lift bars

- Separate air hoses

- “Near-scale” draft gear box with side detail

- Kadee® “scale-head” couplers

- CNC-machined 33” wheels in high-quality Tangent Scale Models ASF cast steel truck with spring plank and with separate brake beams

- Replacement semi-scale wheels available separately from Tangent

- Multiple road numbers for each scheme - these cars often traveled in "groups" of more than one

- Recommended age 14 years and older

 

Don’t miss out on the Tangent Scale Models General American 8,000 gallon 1917-design radial course tank car!  Just like its prototype, this car will stand out on any layout situated from 1917 to 1970, and they went everywhere!

 

Pricing for RTR models is $44.95.  High-resolution images showing these fine replicas are available at www.tangentscalemodels.com and our site also includes prototype images for your reference as well.

 

That wraps up our update for today, and thank you for supporting the family-owned businesses in our industry! 

 

David Lehlbach, Founder

Tangent Scale Models - “Unparalleled scale replicas for discriminating railroad modelers”

www.tangentscalemodels.com


Re: Cable Reel Loads

Bruce Smith
 

Likewise and to make it more complicated, cable can be called "wire rope" 😉

What I am interested in are the reels, made of steel, that carried cable or wire.

Regards,
Bruce


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 11:30 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads
 

Schuyler,

 

I was talking about REELS capable of handling either steel cable or wire like used in communications.  Both are quite heavy.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 12:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Clarity, please . . .

 

Are we talking about reels of steel CABLE or reels of WIRE?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 10:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Bruce,

 

This isn’t the answer you are looking for but it might start you in the correct direction.  Steel cable reels were alive and well in the 1970’s when I hauled them.  What I saw ranged from 6,000 to 15,000 lbs. with wire on them.

 

It seems like anything less than 5,000 lbs. was prime for wooden reels.

 

Steel reels were always returned empty.  The wooden ones not so much, but some really good ones were returned.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 9:29 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Folks,

 

I have some questions about Cable Reels as loads for steam era freight cars. 

 

I have a Sunshine PRR G27 gondola kit that was packaged with a kit for 18 steel cable reels. I model 1944. When did steel cable reels come into use?

 

This kit has a nice set of decals for cable reel labels, but when I search GOOGLE, all the steel reels seem to have very little labeling. Indeed, it looks like it might be tough to apply the decals to these reels anyway, since they have ribs on the outside and the only photo photo I have seen with a label (Okonite), has it on a placard attached to the ribs. Were steel cable reels commonly labeled in the steam era? Photos? 

 

If the decals don't work for the steel reels, I'll repurpose them for the wood reels I have. The decal set included is pretty comprehensive and amazing. Are there other decal sets to label cable reels?

 

Regards,

Bruce 

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Re: Cable Reel Loads

Mont Switzer
 

Schuyler,

 

I was talking about REELS capable of handling either steel cable or wire like used in communications.  Both are quite heavy.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 12:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Clarity, please . . .

 

Are we talking about reels of steel CABLE or reels of WIRE?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 10:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Bruce,

 

This isn’t the answer you are looking for but it might start you in the correct direction.  Steel cable reels were alive and well in the 1970’s when I hauled them.  What I saw ranged from 6,000 to 15,000 lbs. with wire on them.

 

It seems like anything less than 5,000 lbs. was prime for wooden reels.

 

Steel reels were always returned empty.  The wooden ones not so much, but some really good ones were returned.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 9:29 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Folks,

 

I have some questions about Cable Reels as loads for steam era freight cars. 

 

I have a Sunshine PRR G27 gondola kit that was packaged with a kit for 18 steel cable reels. I model 1944. When did steel cable reels come into use?

 

This kit has a nice set of decals for cable reel labels, but when I search GOOGLE, all the steel reels seem to have very little labeling. Indeed, it looks like it might be tough to apply the decals to these reels anyway, since they have ribs on the outside and the only photo photo I have seen with a label (Okonite), has it on a placard attached to the ribs. Were steel cable reels commonly labeled in the steam era? Photos? 

 

If the decals don't work for the steel reels, I'll repurpose them for the wood reels I have. The decal set included is pretty comprehensive and amazing. Are there other decal sets to label cable reels?

 

Regards,

Bruce 

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Boxcar 54409 "Buy War Bonds"

A 1942 photo from the Temple University Libraries:

https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p15037coll3/id/49797/rec/1204

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Note the four quadrant switch crew chalk marking near the grab iron. This is a typical pattern with a "+" sign with a letter or number code for the location, shift, carman and "ok" in the four quadrants.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Iron Ore In Gondolas & Hoppers

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Iron Ore In Gondolas & Hoppers

A 1952 photo from the Temple University Libraries:

https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p15037coll3/id/17874/rec/972

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Perhaps this is limestone and not iron ore?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Cable Reel Loads

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Clarity, please . . .

 

Are we talking about reels of steel CABLE or reels of WIRE?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 10:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Bruce,

 

This isn’t the answer you are looking for but it might start you in the correct direction.  Steel cable reels were alive and well in the 1970’s when I hauled them.  What I saw ranged from 6,000 to 15,000 lbs. with wire on them.

 

It seems like anything less than 5,000 lbs. was prime for wooden reels.

 

Steel reels were always returned empty.  The wooden ones not so much, but some really good ones were returned.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 9:29 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cable Reel Loads

 

Folks,

 

I have some questions about Cable Reels as loads for steam era freight cars. 

 

I have a Sunshine PRR G27 gondola kit that was packaged with a kit for 18 steel cable reels. I model 1944. When did steel cable reels come into use?

 

This kit has a nice set of decals for cable reel labels, but when I search GOOGLE, all the steel reels seem to have very little labeling. Indeed, it looks like it might be tough to apply the decals to these reels anyway, since they have ribs on the outside and the only photo photo I have seen with a label (Okonite), has it on a placard attached to the ribs. Were steel cable reels commonly labeled in the steam era? Photos? 

 

If the decals don't work for the steel reels, I'll repurpose them for the wood reels I have. The decal set included is pretty comprehensive and amazing. Are there other decal sets to label cable reels?

 

Regards,

Bruce 

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Photo: UP "See Though" Boxcar 195220

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: UP "See Though" Boxcar 195220

A 1953 photo from the Temple University Libraries:

https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p15037coll3/id/20067/rec/494

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

I know other railroads had similar cars. Does anyone know more about the history of this car?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

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