Date   

Re: reefer spotted there has PFE reporting marks

Douglas Harding
 

Claus, PFE had a very small fleet of meat reefers, about 300. Not at home so can’t check the book as to numbers or era.

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2020 3:27 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] reefer spotted there has PFE reporting marks

 

Hi List Members,

 

I like this image of a Cudahy Packing building. I am surprised to see the reefer spotted there has PFE reporting marks!

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


CNW: Not the most common SS box car

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-

Something to share which is closer to the later years of Steam Era Freight Cars. This slide was on Ebay last week. I did not bid on it as I thought a friend of mine was going to bid for it. He did not, so I missed out.

I think that there is a Sunshine resin kit for this basic Howe truss car (without the plug door). This SS retro fitted with a plug door and carrying the North Western's great freight car paint scheme solidifies the idea that there is a lot to like here.

Inline image
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Are these cars being loaded with sawdust?

Bill Decker
 

Mel,

The original mill at Toledo--at least that which survives--was built by the US Army Spruce Division during WWI.  After the war, those assets were sold off.  In the case of the Toledo mill, it was sold to C.D. Johnson.  C.D. Johnson sold the mill to Georgia-Pacific in the early 1950s.  This was a dynamic time in the forest products industry as the Kraft pulp process was applied to wood chips for paper pulp.  Several large pulp and paper mills were built throughout the Pacific Northwest with many coming on-line toward the end of RR steam operations in the mid 1950s.  

G-P had another mill--not certain where--that they shipped wood chips to in the mid 1950s, per my earlier note concerning an SP GS gondola with chip rack (G-50-20-A) carrying the first such load out in 1957.  In 1958, G-P added a pulp and paper mill at Toledo.  Apparently, wood chips might have gone both ways for a brief time, but by the end of this list's time-frame, its of wood chips began flowing from other sawmill operations out to Toledo.  Yet today, G-P has both a saw mill and a pulp and paper mill at Toledo.  

Co-located saw and pulp mills are a common occurrence for large operations here in Oregon and Washington.  Weyerhaeuser in Springfield, Oregon, is another such mill with a full range of forest products and a co-located pulp mill.  Of course, these were and are rail-served, although (future date for this list) rail transport of wood chips has fallen by the wayside, notwithstanding earnest efforts on the part of the current shoreline operator.  Wood chips often were a loss-leader for the railroads--moved at a loss in the expectation that the finished product would go by rail--hopefully on a long haul.  

Bill Decker
McMinnville, Oregon--home of the Spruce Goose, stuffed and mounted in the Evergreen Air and Space Museum


Re: Paint Booth

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

I used pre-made 6” air conditioning duct parts. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:57 PM, Curt Fortenberry <curtfortenberry@...> wrote:



The MR plan does have a slight technical issue.  The arrangement of the ducts is actually counter to the way you'd do it for airflow.  I ended going to a sheet metal shop and had a correct transition piece made for the fan mount to the ductwork.

Curt Fortenberry


Re: Paint Booth

gastro42000 <martincooper@...>
 


On June 3, 2020 at 3:53 PM Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

SPARKLESS....effing autocorrect!
 
Hi: many years ago NCE made a very nice large paint booth to be vented outside. Maybe you could find a used one. They also made a sand blaster booth, but I missed that. Marty Cooper 

From: Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2020 2:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Booth
 
We've been over this before, but "sparkles" fans are NOT needed for a paint booth. The concentration of flammable agent is never high enough. Just get the highest capacity bathroom or kitchen vent fans you can find.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2020 2:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Booth
 
I built my own probably 30 years ago using 1/8" hardboard for the bottom, sides and back, with triangular cross section molding where the panels joined.  I added a vertical slot at the back for a standard size furnace filter, and made the top from Lexan clear sheet to allow light in.  The inside is painted white, which I protect with clear food wrap.  I used two surplus computer cooling fans with inductive motors (no sparking) at the back to pull the air out and through the filter.  Probably a squirrel cage fan would be more effective.  The waste air was ducted out a window using dryer vent components.  The face opening is probably 28"w by 16" high.

Todd Sullivan

 


boxcars at ‘OWRN Terminal #4 Grain Elevator’

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Three UP double sheathed boxcars at ‘OWRN Terminal #4 Grain Elevator’.
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


reefer spotted there has PFE reporting marks

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I like this image of a Cudahy Packing building. I am surprised to see the reefer spotted there has PFE reporting marks!
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Paint Booth

Curt Fortenberry
 


The MR plan does have a slight technical issue.  The arrangement of the ducts is actually counter to the way you'd do it for airflow.  I ended going to a sheet metal shop and had a correct transition piece made for the fan mount to the ductwork.

Curt Fortenberry


Re: Paint Booth

Todd Sullivan
 

Bruce  -  Got it!

I did not know that about the fans, and that will simplify my search for a replacement.  Thanks!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Paint Booth

Bruce Smith
 

SPARKLESS....effing autocorrect!


From: Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2020 2:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Booth
 
We've been over this before, but "sparkles" fans are NOT needed for a paint booth. The concentration of flammable agent is never high enough. Just get the highest capacity bathroom or kitchen vent fans you can find.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2020 2:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Booth
 
I built my own probably 30 years ago using 1/8" hardboard for the bottom, sides and back, with triangular cross section molding where the panels joined.  I added a vertical slot at the back for a standard size furnace filter, and made the top from Lexan clear sheet to allow light in.  The inside is painted white, which I protect with clear food wrap.  I used two surplus computer cooling fans with inductive motors (no sparking) at the back to pull the air out and through the filter.  Probably a squirrel cage fan would be more effective.  The waste air was ducted out a window using dryer vent components.  The face opening is probably 28"w by 16" high.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Paint Booth

Bruce Smith
 

We've been over this before, but "sparkles" fans are NOT needed for a paint booth. The concentration of flammable agent is never high enough. Just get the highest capacity bathroom or kitchen vent fans you can find.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2020 2:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Paint Booth
 
I built my own probably 30 years ago using 1/8" hardboard for the bottom, sides and back, with triangular cross section molding where the panels joined.  I added a vertical slot at the back for a standard size furnace filter, and made the top from Lexan clear sheet to allow light in.  The inside is painted white, which I protect with clear food wrap.  I used two surplus computer cooling fans with inductive motors (no sparking) at the back to pull the air out and through the filter.  Probably a squirrel cage fan would be more effective.  The waste air was ducted out a window using dryer vent components.  The face opening is probably 28"w by 16" high.

Todd Sullivan


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 275458 & Men Unloading Rail

John Stanford
 

Most rail of that era would have been 33' long, with an occational 36'.  With the car showing in OER as 37'6" IL that looks about right for a 33'er.

Still a good workout!


Re: Paint Booth

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

My brother owns a sheet metal fabrication company. I gave him the plans that ran in Model Railroader, and he welded one up for me. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Jun 3, 2020, at 2:27 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

I built my own probably 30 years ago using 1/8" hardboard for the bottom, sides and back, with triangular cross section molding where the panels joined.  I added a vertical slot at the back for a standard size furnace filter, and made the top from Lexan clear sheet to allow light in.  The inside is painted white, which I protect with clear food wrap.  I used two surplus computer cooling fans with inductive motors (no sparking) at the back to pull the air out and through the filter.  Probably a squirrel cage fan would be more effective.  The waste air was ducted out a window using dryer vent components.  The face opening is probably 28"w by 16" high.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Are these cars being loaded with sawdust?

Allen Cain
 

Sawdust is also used to produce MDF board which is basically sawdust that has been broken down into fibers and combined with a with binder.

I ran a large wood millwork company in Madras, OR a few years ago and the sawdust was collected in dust collectors and loaded into semi-trailers and sold.

And we made a LOT of dust.

Allen Cain


Re: Paint Booth

Todd Sullivan
 

I built my own probably 30 years ago using 1/8" hardboard for the bottom, sides and back, with triangular cross section molding where the panels joined.  I added a vertical slot at the back for a standard size furnace filter, and made the top from Lexan clear sheet to allow light in.  The inside is painted white, which I protect with clear food wrap.  I used two surplus computer cooling fans with inductive motors (no sparking) at the back to pull the air out and through the filter.  Probably a squirrel cage fan would be more effective.  The waste air was ducted out a window using dryer vent components.  The face opening is probably 28"w by 16" high.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Are these cars being loaded with sawdust?

mel perry
 

which begs the question, why into
toledo, did GP repurpose the mill?
or what?
thanks
mel perry

On Wed, Jun 3, 2020, 9:00 AM Bill Decker <sp.billd@...> wrote:
Nolan,

The "Spruce" in Spruce Goose actually is not Spruce.  It is Canadian pine.  That bird rests within five miles of where I am typing this.....  

Beyond that, the US Army Spruce Division was a World War One phenomena.  Airplanes of that era were built of wood.  WW2 saw a few wood aircraft, most notably the British Mosquito.  Howard Hughes Spruce Goose attempted to tap into the use of wood, as well.

Back to the wood chips coming out of Toledo Oregon in the mid-late 1950s.  A further check with local sources indicates the Georgia-Pacific pulp and paper mill at Toledo opened in 1958, obviously after the earlier referenced photo.  That makes shipping wood chips out of Toledo a brief phenomena of 1957 and part of 1958.  Thereafter, it was long strings of wood chip cars going out to Toledo on the Oregon Coast, passing through the middle of Corvallis (my home town) on their way.  As noted previously, all of this took place after SP steam dropped its fires, although G-P may well have had their steam locomotive still working out at the mill at Toledo.

Bill Deckder
McMinnville, Oregon


Re: Tichy USRA boxcar underframes

steve_wintner
 

Bruce, elaborate  please. I assume this the USRA single sheathed car?


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 275458 & Men Unloading Rail

Todd Sullivan
 

Yes, but this is the USA Spruce Division, and these guys are LOGGERS.  Strong men!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 275458 & Men Unloading Rail

Tony Thompson
 

Ted Schnepf wrote:

This is am interesting photo. Lets assume 90 pound rail, 39' long, which would weigh 1200 pounds. There are 12 men, lifting each rail out of the car, roughly 100 pounds per man, if all lifting evenly.

could ber a long day, 100 rails later.

     I'm always amused at model railroads where the owner has modeled four men carrying a length of rail with rail tongs.

Tony Thompson




Re: Tichy USRA boxcar underframes

Dave Parker
 

Bruce:

That's interesting.  Is the UF the same as in some other Tichy model, thus representing some economy in tooling?

The good news is that I can't see any flaws looking at the side-sills.  If I have to crawl under the car to see the error, I can probably live with it.  It's why I stopped installing train-lines.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA