Date   

Re: Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

Tony Thompson
 

mel perry wrote:

i believe, in the real world, that's a no-no

  In later years, yes. In the 1950s, no.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

Todd Sullivan
 

But correct 'Chingish' would be, "Model million pulpwood load begins first stick."  No 'a' or 'the' in Mandarin, ditto prepositions.

Todd Sullivan
who learned Chinglish from my dear wife who is from Beijing.


Re: Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

Allen Cain
 

All else fails, place it directly behind the engine then the other cars will not be impacted.  

But if all cars are properly weighted to NMRA standards, I would not think that there would be a problem unless the curve radius are REALLY tight?

Just my 2 cents.

Allen Cain


Re: Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Bob,

(Here I go again!) I suspect this photo is somewhat mislabeled. The loads are may be shake wood on its way to a shingle mill. 

Nice photo though. Good find.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 1:16 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Bob,

Unless those crates contain spare parts, or are part of a "kit", they are far too small for a whole car.

In the early days before Evans racks, autos were sometimes shipped in crates (via freight cars; mandatory content). I wonder if this continued into later times for overseas shipments. Recently I was watching a Smithsonian channel documentary on the Raj in India. One of the sahibs had a very nice Packard auto, pretty much a luxury car for the time. Would this have been crated for shipment? I suspect so.

I owe my life to a 1948 Packard semi-limo my father bought used around 1954. We were rear-ended while stopped by a drunk driver in a Cadillac the police estimated was going well over 60 miles an hour. Our car went airborne, and was thrown all the way across a 4-lane intersection. We all had minor injuries, but my father was able to nurse the car the ten or so miles to our home. The Caddie was winched up onto a flatbed and hauled off to the junkyard. My father immediately bought another used Packard. Those autos were built like the tanks Packard engines powered during the war.

But I digress.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 1:59 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates

A 1905 photo from the Wayne State University Libraries:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:CFAIEB01e765

Click on "Open Image in Viewer".

This image can be enlarged quite a bit but loads slowly.

Description: "1921-22 Packard truck, left side view, unloading Packard crates into boxcars."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Loading Raw Silk

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

Edward has pretty much hit the silk problem on the head. Silk was a very, very valuable cargo, and was a tempting target for organized crime. Some division points along the silk routes had vault-like buildings into which silk cars could be placed for safe storage until the next train was dispatched. Likely the building was protected by armed officers when it was full. Way back in the 1960s, Bud Sima wrote an article about building one of these vaults in MR.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 12:16 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

It was incredibly valuable cargo. Why are so many non-perishable products (MILLIONS of TONS) now
shipped by air? Because it's so valuable that the higher transportation cost is negligible. It's hard to steal from
a fast moving train (or airplane). :-)


On 6/10/2020 12:08 PM, spsalso via groups.io wrote:
I mentioned a couple of those reasons for speed in my earlier post.

As I envision the hoopla accompanying the silk shipments, I also see another benefit from railroad speed:  self-promotion.

"Sure they're fast.  But we're FASTER!  Just look at the last running time!  We're BETTER than that other line!"

Sometimes it seemed kind of over-the-top.  This could explain why.

Edward Sutorik


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates

A 1905 photo from the Wayne State University Libraries:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:CFAIEB01e765

Click on "Open Image in Viewer".

This image can be enlarged quite a bit but loads slowly.

Description: "1921-22 Packard truck, left side view, unloading Packard crates into boxcars."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dry Ice Refrigerator Car Test

Bob Chaparro
 

Dry Ice Refrigerator Car Test

Here is some "dry" reading if you have the time and inclination:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924003645607&view=1up&seq=19

This is a 1952 technical paper from the USDA reporting on a refrigerator car equipped with dry ice system of refrigeration.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Awesome photo! I especially like the gondola closest to the camera – it has a hole punched into the side, and the side plates are rusted thru near the bottom.
 
While I cannot identify the gondola based on visible lettering, the construction and the rivet pattern tells me it is definitely a PRR class GS (or GS subclass) gondola
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: 10 June, 2020 13:21
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977
 

Great shot, incredibly clear.  But the mere thought of wanting to model that load gives me a very bad headache!

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 1:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

 

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

Bob Chaparro
 

An old Chinese proverb says, "The modeling of a million piece pulpwood load begins with a first stick."

I read this in a fortune cookie message. The other side of the message had a one-step tip for fixing the underframe of an InterMountain reefer.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Reefers At Michigan Central Yard - Detroit

mel perry
 

the one without is a different roof altogether
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 10:22 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Reefers At Michigan Central Yard - Detroit

A 1928 photo from the Wayne State University Libraries:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:vmc77171_1

These photos load slowly but can be enlarged quite a bit.

Most of the identifiable reefers are either PFE or SFRD. Note the car number stenciling on the hatch cover of the PFE reefer in the right-center foreground and the reefer coupled to it. There is no stenciling on the PFE reefer to the left of the first reefer.

Comparing these three PFE cars, two have a platform surrounding the hatch cover, one does not.

More reefers, same location and year:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:vmc77171

Bob Chaparro

Hemet


Photo: Reefers At Michigan Central Yard - Detroit

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Reefers At Michigan Central Yard - Detroit

A 1928 photo from the Wayne State University Libraries:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:vmc77171_1

These photos load slowly but can be enlarged quite a bit.

Most of the identifiable reefers are either PFE or SFRD. Note the car number stenciling on the hatch cover of the PFE reefer in the right-center foreground and the reefer coupled to it. There is no stenciling on the PFE reefer to the left of the first reefer.

Comparing these three PFE cars, two have a platform surrounding the hatch cover, one does not.

More reefers, same location and year:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:vmc77171

Bob Chaparro

Hemet


Re: Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Great shot, incredibly clear.  But the mere thought of wanting to model that load gives me a very bad headache!

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 1:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

 

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

mel perry
 

i believe, in the real world, that's a no-no
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 10:16 AM Paul Koehler <koehlers@...> wrote:

All:

 

Not true, MTS Brass car with the Aluminum tanks, I can run anywhere in a train and any length train.  Three cars to over thirty, as you can see it’s first out in front of the caboose in this train.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gastro42000
Sent: Tuesday, June 09, 2020 11:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; Tony Thompson <tony@...>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

 

 

On June 9, 2020 at 2:04 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:  po

Marty Cooper wrote:hi: yep. I wanted one, I got one. It makes a nice static display, but it is too heavy to run without pulling the rest of the cars off the track. Marty Cooper 



Hi: it also makes a nice brass car, but very heavy. Marty Cooper 

 

     There was at least one brass version which had turned aluminum tanks.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


 

Attachments:


Re: Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

Paul Koehler
 

All:

 

Not true, MTS Brass car with the Aluminum tanks, I can run anywhere in a train and any length train.  Three cars to over thirty, as you can see it’s first out in front of the caboose in this train.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gastro42000
Sent: Tuesday, June 09, 2020 11:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; Tony Thompson <tony@...>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

 

 

On June 9, 2020 at 2:04 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:  po

Marty Cooper wrote:hi: yep. I wanted one, I got one. It makes a nice static display, but it is too heavy to run without pulling the rest of the cars off the track. Marty Cooper 



Hi: it also makes a nice brass car, but very heavy. Marty Cooper 

 

     There was at least one brass version which had turned aluminum tanks.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


 


Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 20/20 Hindsight Virtual RPM coming fast

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I searched my email for “virtual,” which got me several dozen hits, but searching for “Speedwitch” got me my receipt too. 

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Adams
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 1:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] 20/20 Hindsight Virtual RPM coming fast

 

Presumably those of us who were able to register will be getting some form of e-mail notification from Speedwitch in the next day or so with the login information. I have an alternate weekly Zoom meeting in the same time period so will have to know which I am attending soon.  I have an unfulfilled order on my Speedwitch account that indicates I will be able to virtually attend. 

As I understand it registration is now closed as the software limits of attendance (room capacity issue?) have been reached. 
--
Ken Adams
In splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek


Re: 20/20 Hindsight Virtual RPM coming fast

Ken Adams
 

Presumably those of us who were able to register will be getting some form of e-mail notification from Speedwitch in the next day or so with the login information. I have an alternate weekly Zoom meeting in the same time period so will have to know which I am attending soon.  I have an unfulfilled order on my Speedwitch account that indicates I will be able to virtually attend. 

As I understand it registration is now closed as the software limits of attendance (room capacity issue?) have been reached. 
--
Ken Adams
In splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek


Re: Photo: Loading Raw Silk

spsalso
 

Tim,

Yes, it's hard to steal from a fast moving train.  And it's hard to steal from a train moving at "regular" speed.  I'd say the difficulty is about the same.

Now, a STOPPED train is different.  And that concept applies to both fast and slow trains.  And dealing with that problem would be similar for both fast and slow trains.

NEVER put the train in a siding.
NEVER give the train a yellow or red block.
During fueling and engine changes, armed guards with those new-fangled machine guns that every citizen may purchase (fun days, then!)
Be ready for surprise stops caused by bad guys (see new-fangled equipment above)
Maybe a couple other things I didn't think of but a bright rising railroader would.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 09:16 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

It was incredibly valuable cargo. Why are so many non-perishable products (MILLIONS of TONS) now
shipped by air? Because it's so valuable that the higher transportation cost is negligible. It's hard to steal from
a fast moving train (or airplane). :-)


On 6/10/2020 12:08 PM, spsalso via groups.io wrote:
I mentioned a couple of those reasons for speed in my earlier post.

As I envision the hoopla accompanying the silk shipments, I also see another benefit from railroad speed:  self-promotion.

"Sure they're fast.  But we're FASTER!  Just look at the last running time!  We're BETTER than that other line!"

Sometimes it seemed kind of over-the-top.  This could explain why.

Edward Sutorik


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Loading Raw Silk

spsalso
 

It may be an error to assume the railroad needed any significant insurance for the raw silk load.

They may have required the SHIPPER to buy any "excess" insurance.

That has happened to many of us when we ship, when we are asked if we want to pay for extra insurance on our expensive shipment.  The shipping company (UPS, USPS) doesn't pay for that; the shipper (YOU) does.  So it may also have been the same for the silk shipments.


Ed

Edward Sutorik

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