Date   

Sheathing on resin kits

Andy Carlson
 

For many decades I have been quite outspoken in lobbying for less aggressive model freight car wood siding gaps in the Single and Double Sheathed car sides. Our very own Brian Leppert, who was the tool maker for the HO MDC 50' SS auto box car back in the Carson City days of Roundhouse, tells how he was instructed to make the car side's grooves "very noticeable", which Brian dutifully followed.

I know a very nice guy who is a major contributor to resin car production whom years ago was unapologetic in sticking to Evergreen factory scribed siding for the house car sides being made back then. In the years following he now makes some of the best siding for HO freight cars and he is justifillably proud of those results.

I show some examples of DS sides, both real and model.
Inline image
Inline image
This is probably the latest DS tooling in HO.

Model Single sheathed cars have seen huge improvements in the last few decades, but I would like to see even further gains.

Inline image
Even in a tired and old SS car, the wood siding does not grow excessively apart.
Inline image
This was called to our attention last week in the STMFC and though extreme, it isn't excessive.
Inline image

This SS side was a quite common condition for SS car sides and you will notice some areas the joints are missing to view.

Inline image
Fresh paint on an older car and yet the boards still fit close together.

I am certainly glad to see movement towards nicer boards on our wood sided cars. Let us not stop yet.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson, Ojai  CA


Well Eric,
    I talked with one of these resin makers not too terribly long ago (certainly more recently than 10 years ago) at CCB and this person told me that if you can't see the boards from more than several feet, people don't purchase them.  Admittedly neither this person or their firm was at CCB or Chicagoland this last year so there may have been some incremental progress, however that is what I am talking about.   We seem to be in conflict here with my first hand conversation and your first hand perceptions.      

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Jim Dick - St. Paul, MN                                                                                        


Re: EARLY LV "wrong way" box

mel perry
 

bud:
trucks are intetesting also?
mel

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020, 4:20 AM Bud Rindfleisch <BlackDiamondRR@...> wrote:
Schuyler,
    Wish I could enlarge the image.I n the meantime I have this builder's photo (I believe) of an early wrongway door LV car.I don't know the photo source as the pic was a gift to me from a friend.
      Bud Rindfleisch


Photo: Ventilated Boxcars

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Ventilated Boxcars

A 1948 photo from the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois:

http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/nby_rrlife/id/389/rec/226

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit to show ACL, Seaboard and L&N ventilated boxcars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: New file uploaded to main@RealSTMFC.groups.io

James Brewer
 

Also, it is not necessary to send me any corrections/additions as an Excel file....a simple email with be fine....thanks!

Jim Brewer


Re: New file uploaded to main@RealSTMFC.groups.io

James Brewer
 

All,

This file was also uploaded to the Resin and Plastic Freight car site; when I attempted to upload it to Reatstmfc there was no space; so I forwarded to Jeff and he kindly has uploaded it.

I have received several corrections/additions to the file; I would ask that if you have any corrections/additions, to forward them directly to me; I have no pride of authorship in this, I am just the scribe.  Please for to me at jim.brewer.3611@...

I anticipate posting the revised file around the beginning of July.  Thanks.

Jim Brewer

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 7:00 PM main@RealSTMFC.groups.io Notification <main+notification@realstmfc.groups.io> wrote:

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that the following files have been uploaded to the Files area of the main@RealSTMFC.groups.io group.

Uploaded By: Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@...>

Description:
Station and Reweigh symbols from James Brewer

Cheers,
The Groups.io Team


New file uploaded to main@RealSTMFC.groups.io

main@RealSTMFC.groups.io Notification <main+notification@...>
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that the following files have been uploaded to the Files area of the main@RealSTMFC.groups.io group.

Uploaded By: Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@...>

Description:
Station and Reweigh symbols from James Brewer

Cheers,
The Groups.io Team


Re: Photo: Loading Raw Silk

John Riddell
 

For an extremely valuable commodity with insurance rates sometimes charged by the hour, speedy delivery was important.

CPR with its integrated railway and steamship  service had a competitive edge. In 1924 CP’s newest liner “Empress of Canada” sped across the Pacific in eight days, ten hours and nine minutes from Tokyo to Vancouver. CPR trains then sped the silk to reach New York only thirteen days after leaving Yokohama harbour.

 

John Riddell

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: EARLY LV "wrong way" box

Edward
 
Edited

These LV box cars were often used in the bagged flour trade out of Buffalo.
Eight-hundred 100 lb. bags of flour made a load. 
Bagged flour like that was used in neighborhood bake shops like the one I grew up in during the 1940's.
LV had left-hand door box cars built in the 1920's which replaced older truss-rodded cars.
Here is one I built in O scale, using photos and spying on the HO model that Syracuse Hobbies was selling at the time.
The flour load was made with Chiclet gum pieces, filling the door area only to keep the weight reasonable.

Ed Bommer


Re: C&O MW Tenders

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Mont,

Yes, the C&O coal tower here in Charlottesville was retained for sanding until the yard was downsized around 1989. The tower is still standing, though derelict. Somebody bought it to turn into a dwelling, but that project went down the tubes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 8:17 AM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:

Garth and all,

 

Many (most?) coaling towers also had provisions for storing and dispensing sand.  That function kept some coaling towers in use well beyond their time.

 

The two that I am most familiar with are the Monon at Lafayette, IN, Shops and the K&IT Youngtown Yard in Louisville, KY.  Both were dispensing sand into the late 1960's.  Both were built from reinforced concrete.

 

Mont Switzer 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford [mallardlodge1000@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 4:57 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O MW Tenders

Mel,

I think the bunkers continued to be used for some years to supply coal for heating and possibly cooking needs to the MW trains, as stated in my original post. Maybe not. Some C&O maven might be able to add more to this.

This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains? Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 5:35 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
garth:
were the fuel bunkers converted also?
thanks
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 1:50 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Attachments:


Re: EARLY LV "wrong way" box

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Terrific photo, Bud, thanks very much.  I wish it carried a blt date.  I’m sure that’s a builder’s photo, with every little detail picked out in white, all the lettering on the wheels and trucks.  Also the slotted coupler knuckle says a lot about the time period.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bud Rindfleisch
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 7:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] EARLY LV "wrong way" box

 

Schuyler,

    Wish I could enlarge the image.I n the meantime I have this builder's photo (I believe) of an early wrongway door LV car.I don't know the photo source as the pic was a gift to me from a friend.

      Bud Rindfleisch


Re: NKP 99819 loading corn in cement hopper Yuton, IL 1946

Matt Smith
 

Follow up to previous, with NKP Yuton Coal Dock in background

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll63/id/4180
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


NKP 99819 loading corn in cement hopper Yuton, IL 1946

Matt Smith
 

Check this out!

NKP 99819 loading corn in cement hopper Yuton, IL 1946 

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll63/id/4404

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Re: C&O MW Tenders

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

No railroad was more dedicated then the C&O in using old tenders for coal & water in the camp trains. A roster published by the C&O Historical Society shows numbers in the "T" series going as high as 308, plus twelve in Wreck train service (with a "W" prefix) and one odd man out numbered X111.

These rosters all specify coal and water capacity. For example, T-239 was rated for 16 tons of coal and 8000 gallons of water.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jun 10, 2020 4:49 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] C&O MW Tenders

Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



Re: C&O MW Tenders

mopacfirst
 

I was in some Santa Fe cabooses in 1969/70 sitting in storage in Wichita, awaiting rebuilding or scrapping, most likely scrapping since the West Wichita shops had just closed.  They all had cast iron stoves.  While I don't remember a coal box, there certainly wasn't any other form of heat.

Ron Merrick


Re: C&O MW Tenders

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 01:58 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains?
That's what they make shovels for. The men on work trains were mostly rated as laborers anyway... want heat tonight... shovel enough coal into the bunker to last us the week.

Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?
Long after the steam era, and long after the time period of this list. I can still remember chasing a South Shore (an electric line) freight down the street in Michigan City with the smell of coal smoke waffing from the caboose stack. This was in the early seventies.

The Soo Line never changed the stoves in their wood cabooses, some of which were still in service in the 1970's. Coal was supplied from a coal box adjacent to the caboose tie-up track.

Dennis Storzek


 
 


Re: C&O MW Tenders

Bill McClure
 

The coal bunkers on C&O MOW tenders were left as-built.

Bill McClure


Re: C&O MW Tenders

Mont Switzer
 

Garth and all,

 

Many (most?) coaling towers also had provisions for storing and dispensing sand.  That function kept some coaling towers in use well beyond their time.

 

The two that I am most familiar with are the Monon at Lafayette, IN, Shops and the K&IT Youngtown Yard in Louisville, KY.  Both were dispensing sand into the late 1960's.  Both were built from reinforced concrete.

 

Mont Switzer 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford [mallardlodge1000@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 4:57 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O MW Tenders

Mel,

I think the bunkers continued to be used for some years to supply coal for heating and possibly cooking needs to the MW trains, as stated in my original post. Maybe not. Some C&O maven might be able to add more to this.

This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains? Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 5:35 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
garth:
were the fuel bunkers converted also?
thanks
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 1:50 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Attachments:


Re: EARLY LV "wrong way" box

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Schuyler,
    Wish I could enlarge the image.I n the meantime I have this builder's photo (I believe) of an early wrongway door LV car.I don't know the photo source as the pic was a gift to me from a friend.
      Bud Rindfleisch


Re: C&O MW Tenders

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Mel,

I think the bunkers continued to be used for some years to supply coal for heating and possibly cooking needs to the MW trains, as stated in my original post. Maybe not. Some C&O maven might be able to add more to this.

This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains? Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 5:35 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
garth:
were the fuel bunkers converted also?
thanks
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 1:50 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Attachments:


Re: Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

Paul Koehler
 

Mel:

 

On the Southern Pacific trains were blocked by destination, not by the load.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mel perry
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 2:34 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tank Car United States Army USAX 16503

 

which leads to the question, what were

the rules, as far as train make up goes,

prior to the rule changes, was there a

national standard that each rr followed

or each rr had their own rules/ideas?,

and if there was a prior national

standard what was it?

thanks

mel perry

 

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 2:26 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

mel perry wrote:



i stand corrected, apparently in the 50's

railroader's were expendable, wonder

what changed that thinking? OSHA?

 

   Not expendable, but expected to use common sense on their own. Occasional failures to do so led to OSHA.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 

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