Date   

Re: UMM Tools

Eric Hansmann
 

I bought an UMM saw a few months back and used it recently to remove a 3/32 strip of material from the side sills of a boxcar kit. I was very happy with the results.

I also bought this micro mitre box.



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On June 14, 2020 at 10:47 PM "Brian Carlson via groups.io" <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Based on George Tolman's clinic yesterday at Hindsight 20/20 I am going to get one of these UMM saws I heard about.  http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_28&products_id=35

I know we have tools junkies on the list. are their other tools I should investigate from their site? Thanks in advance.
Brian Carlson 

 



Re: UMM Tools

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Although most seem to currently sold out, I have liked using the micro chisels for removing plastic molded details.  Much easier than working with the chisel blade Xacto.

 

http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_224&products_id=8285

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Carlson via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 11:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] UMM Tools

 

Based on George Tolman's clinic yesterday at Hindsight 20/20 I am going to get one of these UMM saws I heard about. http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_28&products_id=35

I know we have tools junkies on the list. are their other tools I should investigate from their site? Thanks in advance.
Brian Carlson 


Re: UMM Tools

steve_wintner
 

They offer a number of different tools for folding and forming photoetched parts. 

I think the also offer etched tools for applying CA, which are well worth the money. 

Steve


UMM Tools

Brian Carlson
 

Based on George Tolman's clinic yesterday at Hindsight 20/20 I am going to get one of these UMM saws I heard about. http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_28&products_id=35

I know we have tools junkies on the list. are their other tools I should investigate from their site? Thanks in advance.
Brian Carlson 


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

erieblt2
 

The South Brooklyn Railway hauled(or attempted to haul) an embalmed whale to the Coney Island Aquarium. See ‘Uptown, Downtown’, by Fischer.


On Jun 14, 2020, at 3:26 PM, Richard Wilkens <railsnw123@...> wrote:

Mention of the whale from the Portland Oregonian

Richard Wilkens

Oregonian, April 13, 1930


WHALE IS TO MOVE ON

Car With Embalmed Mammal to Leave Portland Monday.


The embalmed whale on exhibition at the North Bank station, Tenth and Hoyt streets, will leave Portland at noon tomorrow to complete a transcontinental tour, it was announced yesterday. Interested crowds have been inspecting the big marine mammal during its stay here. Entire classes of several schools have passed around the glass and steel housing under which the 65-ton creature lies on display and listened to the lecture by Captain Harry S. White.


The 130 pupils of the school for the deaf at Vancouver inspected the whale Friday, and instructors translated the lecture into the sign language for-the deaf.               .


The whale being exhibited is of the baleen or whalebone variety and it is so placed that the function of the whalebone in the mouth is apparent.


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Bruce Smith
 

Steve, Folks,

It turns out that embalming whales and then touring with them was a repeated attraction over many years.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Steven D Johnson <tenncentralrwy@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 4:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier
 

I remember going to see one of these embalmed whales, which was housed in a specially-made semi trailer.  That was in the 1960s in my hometown of Hopkinsville, KY.  It was in the parking lot of a shopping center, next to a small carnival with rides. I don’t recall any odor, but it’s been a while ago…

 

Steve Johnson

Nashville, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 4:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

 

And the odor.  I guess you'd have to come up with essences of either embalming fluid or decomposing whale to provide in the kit.  Phew!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Richard Wilkens
 

Mention of the whale from the Portland Oregonian

Richard Wilkens

Oregonian, April 13, 1930


WHALE IS TO MOVE ON

Car With Embalmed Mammal to Leave Portland Monday.


The embalmed whale on exhibition at the North Bank station, Tenth and Hoyt streets, will leave Portland at noon tomorrow to complete a transcontinental tour, it was announced yesterday. Interested crowds have been inspecting the big marine mammal during its stay here. Entire classes of several schools have passed around the glass and steel housing under which the 65-ton creature lies on display and listened to the lecture by Captain Harry S. White.


The 130 pupils of the school for the deaf at Vancouver inspected the whale Friday, and instructors translated the lecture into the sign language for-the deaf.               .


The whale being exhibited is of the baleen or whalebone variety and it is so placed that the function of the whalebone in the mouth is apparent.


Re: brakes

Dave Parker
 

You're welcome Schuyler, and apologies for the semi-obvious typo.  The K-2 triple was paired with 10-inch diameter cylinders; it was the "long" dimension that was 12".
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Steven D Johnson
 

I remember going to see one of these embalmed whales, which was housed in a specially-made semi trailer.  That was in the 1960s in my hometown of Hopkinsville, KY.  It was in the parking lot of a shopping center, next to a small carnival with rides. I don’t recall any odor, but it’s been a while ago…

 

Steve Johnson

Nashville, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 4:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

 

And the odor.  I guess you'd have to come up with essences of either embalming fluid or decomposing whale to provide in the kit.  Phew!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Observe how this special car was provided with just the right number of panels to accept the word “TRANSCONTINENTAL.”

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 1:45 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

 

Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

A 1930 photo from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture:

https://ferrisarchives.northwestmuseum.org/Item/Index/9099

A special car.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Whale not included.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 2:56 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

 

      Anybody wanna model this? Could be a Shake 'n' Take . . .

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Todd Sullivan
 

And the odor.  I guess you'd have to come up with essences of either embalming fluid or decomposing whale to provide in the kit.  Phew!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Todd Sullivan
 

Ed Bommer said,

"Not just the embalmed whale presumably inside the rail car, but what about that automobile?
There seems to be a tow line connecting its back end to the railroad with a whale inside.
Perhaps this photo was arranged by an automobile dealer to advertise on how powerful that new car was?"

Or maybe he was offering a whale of a deal.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Tony Thompson
 

Decals. Decals are always the problem.

   There are alway ways to get decals produced. Modeling the interior of this load will be the challenge <g>.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Richard Townsend
 

Decals. Decals are always the problem.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson <tony@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Jun 14, 2020 11:55 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

      Anybody wanna model this? Could be a Shake 'n' Take . . .

Tony Thompson




Re: brakes

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thank you, Randy, this is great background information.  Much appreciated.

 

Schuyler

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Randy Hees
Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2020 8:05 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] brakes

 

The original Westinghouse automatic brake valve was designated the "F"  It was patented in 1872.   It did not have "fast action".  In general it was good for a train of 8-10 cars.  The F valve did not meet the minimum standard (no valve did) at the first Burlington Air Brake trial in 1886, which used a 50 car train..  In response Westinghouse offered the "H" brake valve, which did have "fast action".  In a fast action, the air brake valve not only applies air in response to dropping the air pressure in the train line, but also recognizes a rapid air pressure loss as an emergency, and in that case in addition to a maximum brake application the valve also vents the train line, reducing pressure in the train line.  As a result the change in pressure is much more rapid, and the brakes apply much quicker.

The "K" valve was introduced in 1906/07 as an improved "H" valve.  They used the same mounting flange (to the brake reservoir if a "HC" or "KC" ("F" used a different flange) Externally the only difference between a "H" and "K" was an added flange on the valve body casting.  Westinghouse offered a kit to convert a "H" to a "K".  That kit included a sheet metal flange to be added to the valve body to give the "H" valve the same silhouette as a "K".

On the D&RG(W) "F" valves were used on tenders until the end of operation.  Most passenger cars on the D&RG(W) had "F" valves, and they are in use on the C&TS historic cars.  The D&RG freight car order of 1903 (3000 class box cars, 30' stock cars, & drop bottom gons all had "H" valves, all of which were converted to "K" with the added sheet metal flange.

Randy Hees


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

Tony Thompson
 

      Anybody wanna model this? Could be a Shake 'n' Take . . .

Tony Thompson




Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

np328
 

Thank you also Mark for the PDF link, 
  like Jeff I was not aware of this link from the Rapido blurb I recv'd in the e-mail letter a few days ago. 
That would have greatly cleared things up however now it's all good. 
I can see reserving some more than one although six seems overboard. Three would have been a good number.
I'll contact the LHS.                Jim Dick - Roseville, MN  


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

erieblt2
 

Now that’s a...unique freight car!


On Jun 14, 2020, at 7:46 AM, Edward <edb8381@...> wrote:

Not just the embalmed whale presumably inside the rail car, but what about that automobile?
There seems to be a tow line connecting its back end to the railroad with a whale inside.
Perhaps this photo was arranged by an automobile dealer to advertise on how powerful that new car was?

Ed Bommer


Re: brakes

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks, Dave, and thanks particularly for that link.  That merits some careful reading, I’m sure.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Parker via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2020 7:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] brakes

 

Schuyler:

There is some conflicting information out there with respect to exact dates (e.g., the NMRA info looks suspect), but I tend to rely on the 1913 Westinghouse handbook for information about K brakes:

https://archive.org/details/westinghouseairb00inteuoft

My understanding is that Westinghouse came up with the "quick-action" triple valve in 1887 (replacing the "plain" valves), and rapidly cornered the marked on air-brake equipment. The first such triple was the "H" valve (H-1, H-2), which was the superseded by the "K" design sometime around the turn of the century (I can't find the exact date with a quick search).  These were just Westinghouse model designations, but they were the de facto industry standard, which is why you see "K-2 Triple" (or K-1) stenciled on so many pre-1927 cars.

In case the clinic didn't cover it, the K-1 valve was for use with 6- and 8-in diameter cylinders, while the K-2 was paired with 12-in cylinders.  KC was short for "cylinder and reservoir Combined", and KD for "cylinder and reservoir Detached".

Hope this helps with the K side of your questions.  I'll leave AB to someone who who models in that era.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA

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