Date   

Re: Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

Tony Thompson
 

Mont Switzer wrote:

I doubt the display portion of hazardous materials placarding regulations have changed all that much over the years.  You could get away with covering a hazardous placard over, but if no covering is available, "when the freight comes off the placard comes off" unless it is a tank car or a car with containers that have residue in them.

   I am sure this is true for hazardous placards, but I was thinking of the many OTHER placards that are used, from "unload other side" and "canned goods" or "frozen food," to "caution - auto parts."

Tony Thompson




Re: UMM Tools

Craig Zeni
 

On Jun 15, 2020, at 6:08 AM, main@RealSTMFC.groups.io wrote:


3c.
From: Steve and Barb Hile <shile@mindspring.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2020 02:12:34 EDT

Although most seem to currently sold out, I have liked using the micro chisels for removing plastic molded details. Much easier than working with the chisel blade Xacto.



http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_224 <http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_224&products_id=8285> &products_id=8285



Steve Hile
I bought one of the UMM saws a few years ago after hearing Greg Martin rave about it. I wasn't disappointed at all. It's an amazing thing and I'm now the guy that raves about them. The UMM saw and some high quality Dumont & FIls tweezers are called out in my resin building presentation and another one that I do that's too modern and not age appropriate here.

The chisel tools that I have converted to, and never looked back, are those from Hasegawa. There's several sizes; the 3mm wide TT-9 "Hasegawa Trytool" is my favorite. The width of the blade makes it harder to accidentally rotate it and create collateral damage. The round TT-5 is my second favorite. The way its tip is cut makes it ideal for going in and nicking off rivets or whatever that are in hard to reach places. I also bought the narrower flat chisel and the 'triangular' chisel - I've not found them to be as useful as the TT-9 and TT-5. MIne came from store.spruebrothers.com ...but it looks like the TT-9 is out of stock right now. With a little practice and care, I've found that I can shave off unwanted details and literally not have to do any clean up with a file or 1000 grit paper. I had to remove the rear overhang from a Highliners F unit shell. In the past I've have used the UMM saw and come back with some 600 and 1000 grit to clean it up. I used the TT-9 and made probably a dozen passes, peeling up a curl of plastic with every pass. It finished clean and needed zero sanding work. The tools are that sharp and good.

At the same web page is the Trumpeter brand of chisels - I tried a couple. Not impressed. At all. Didn't feel sharp, didn't handle well.


Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Re: UMM Tools

Ken Adams
 

Modify the um-usa url's to HTTPS so you won't get nasty messages about unsecure sites. 

Very interesting stuff. There goes the last of the $1200 virus giveaway.  Tool stuff that Micro-Mark doesn't do. Will admit to being a bit of a micro tool guy...But on my very limited active workspace I find I spend a lot of time trying to remember where that tool I need now is hiding.
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek


Re: UMM Tools

steve_wintner
 

Oh, interesting. 

The ones I have aren't a loop. The are an open end,   more like your needle. Allows me to reach in and drop a dot of CA right around the grab wire just above where it enters the hole. The CA then flows down into the hole, very neat. The CA then dries in the applicator before I can remove it, of course. But a candle flame fixes that. 

http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_113&products_id=6487

I'm sure the loop is good too, maybe better for some applications - I think I'll give them a try, thanks for pointing them out!

I've also used the Small Shops bug, as Dave P mentioned. Very nice. But I currently have one particular bend that it cannot do - UMMs 150mm bender, the one Jim mentioned, looks like a good bet. 

Steve W


Re: Photo: UP Boxcar 13356 With Banner

Bob Chaparro
 

Tony Thompson discussed the "star" in this blog post:
http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2014/05/the-equipment-register-part-4.html
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: New file uploaded to main@RealSTMFC.groups.io

Schleigh Mike
 

Hi Jim!

No, I don't have any more specifics about the B&M.  That road is not my first interest but I am a member of the group and have had some focus on their "DS" as that site did the re-weigh work for the first of the B&M "WAG" boxcars that appeared in 1958.  Dave and I communicate frequently.  He is a good B&M source.  Likewise Rick Nowell.

Also, I neglected Ferrona, Penna. as "FR" for the ERIE list.  That site is the closest to my current residence here in Western Pennsylvania.  Ferrona was the ERIE's yard at Sharon, Penna.

I think it wonderful you are doing this list.  We just cannot seem to get enough detail about these addictive freight cars.

Regards----Mike

On Monday, June 15, 2020, 11:28:37 AM EDT, James Brewer <jim.brewer.3611@...> wrote:


Mike,

I should have been more specific......my question really related to the B&M list as you have parsed the Erie information from the color guide.  Sorry for the confusion. Dave Parker has supplied info on the B&M based upon those he had seen on freight cars.  Thanks!

Jim


Re: New file uploaded to main@RealSTMFC.groups.io

James Brewer
 

Mike,

I should have been more specific......my question really related to the B&M list as you have parsed the Erie information from the color guide.  Sorry for the confusion. Dave Parker has supplied info on the B&M based upon those he had seen on freight cars.  Thanks!

Jim


Re: New file uploaded to main@RealSTMFC.groups.io

James Brewer
 

Mike,

Thanks for the information.  Do you know which of these reweighed freight cars?

One thing that I have learned is that each shop on the railroad had an identifying code or symbol; but not every shop did reweigh work.  So, for example, at the small N&W yard in Waynesboro, VA they probably could repack a journal box or maybe even test a reservoir, but they did not reweigh cars there.

Thanks.

Jim Brewer


Re: UMM Tools

Dave Parker
 

I second what Steve said about the micro-chisels.  I bought three, and the Xacto #17 blades are not getting much use at all.

I also bought the MN-004 bender and, for the Yarmouth ladder stiles, I like it significantly better than The Bug from The Small Shop.  The latter is more versatile however, as the "teeth" in the top plate allow for bending of more complex shapes.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: A daft question

Paul Doggett
 

Hi Todd 

I understand that thank you.

Paul 


On 15 Jun 2020, at 15:02, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

Hi Paul,

Not unless the crew needed the same marks on both sides.  Most crews on yard switchers worked on one side of the loco and cars - the side that provided the greatest visibility for all crew members.  Local freight crews did the same thing, although which side would depend on the track layout at each town or switching location.

Todd Sullivan


Re: A daft question

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Paul,

Not unless the crew needed the same marks on both sides.  Most crews on yard switchers worked on one side of the loco and cars - the side that provided the greatest visibility for all crew members.  Local freight crews did the same thing, although which side would depend on the track layout at each town or switching location.

Todd Sullivan


Re: UMM Tools

James Brewer
 

Brian,

I think George and/or Lester Breuer recommended this tool for bending photo-etched parts; I bought one and it is very easy to use; currently listed as out of stock but expected within 2-3 weeks: http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_225&products_id=59

Here is a larger version of the bender, but it is probably to big for our applications: http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_225&products_id=28

I think I will also order that saw that George showed.

Jim Brewer


A daft question

Paul Doggett
 

Hi
This is probably a daft question but were chalk marks the same on each side of the car?

Paul Doggett. England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


Re: Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

Mont Switzer
 

Bob and Tony,

 

I doubt the display portion of hazardous materials placarding regulations have changed all that much over the years.  You could get away with covering a hazardous placard over, but if no covering is available, "when the freight comes off the placard comes off" unless it is a tank car or a car with containers that have residue in them.

 

As we all know, railroads began lowering placard (tack) boards in the mid-1950's so you didn't need to be at a dock or have a ladder to install the placards.

 

Mont Switzer   


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of erieblt2 [williamfsmith22@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 2:33 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

Good eye! I think removing the placard without a ladder(or being at a loading dock)would be tough! Placard boards in photos often seem to have kept their paint more than I saw in real life. Bill S

On Jun 14, 2020, at 11:05 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Bob Chaparro wrote:

Seriously, were there any regulations about removing placards that were no longer needed?

    A former railroad clerk I talked to about route cards and placards, when asked if the old ones were removed before adding new ones, replied "Why? Just tack 'em on top." Photos do exist of placards partly ripped off, likely "disabling" them without taking time to cleanly remove them.

Tony Thompson




Re: UMM Tools

Matt Goodman
 

Steve mentioned a photo-etched flue applicator. I’m not familiar with UMMs version, but have had good luck with the glue looper with thin glues - I rarely use my open-ended sewing needle anymore. 

http://www.creativedynamicllc.com/the-glue-looper.html

They have a loop for thick glues; I have one of those, but haven’t test used it. 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Jun 15, 2020, at 1:21 AM, steve_wintner via groups.io <steve_wintner@...> wrote:

They offer a number of different tools for folding and forming photoetched parts. 

I think the also offer etched tools for applying CA, which are well worth the money. 

Steve


Re: UMM Tools

Eric Hansmann
 

I bought an UMM saw a few months back and used it recently to remove a 3/32 strip of material from the side sills of a boxcar kit. I was very happy with the results.

I also bought this micro mitre box.



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On June 14, 2020 at 10:47 PM "Brian Carlson via groups.io" <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Based on George Tolman's clinic yesterday at Hindsight 20/20 I am going to get one of these UMM saws I heard about.  http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_28&products_id=35

I know we have tools junkies on the list. are their other tools I should investigate from their site? Thanks in advance.
Brian Carlson 

 



Re: UMM Tools

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Although most seem to currently sold out, I have liked using the micro chisels for removing plastic molded details.  Much easier than working with the chisel blade Xacto.

 

http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_224&products_id=8285

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Carlson via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 11:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] UMM Tools

 

Based on George Tolman's clinic yesterday at Hindsight 20/20 I am going to get one of these UMM saws I heard about. http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_28&products_id=35

I know we have tools junkies on the list. are their other tools I should investigate from their site? Thanks in advance.
Brian Carlson 


Re: UMM Tools

steve_wintner
 

They offer a number of different tools for folding and forming photoetched parts. 

I think the also offer etched tools for applying CA, which are well worth the money. 

Steve


UMM Tools

Brian Carlson
 

Based on George Tolman's clinic yesterday at Hindsight 20/20 I am going to get one of these UMM saws I heard about. http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_28&products_id=35

I know we have tools junkies on the list. are their other tools I should investigate from their site? Thanks in advance.
Brian Carlson 


Re: Photo: Embalmed Whale Carrier

erieblt2
 

The South Brooklyn Railway hauled(or attempted to haul) an embalmed whale to the Coney Island Aquarium. See ‘Uptown, Downtown’, by Fischer.


On Jun 14, 2020, at 3:26 PM, Richard Wilkens <railsnw123@...> wrote:

Mention of the whale from the Portland Oregonian

Richard Wilkens

Oregonian, April 13, 1930


WHALE IS TO MOVE ON

Car With Embalmed Mammal to Leave Portland Monday.


The embalmed whale on exhibition at the North Bank station, Tenth and Hoyt streets, will leave Portland at noon tomorrow to complete a transcontinental tour, it was announced yesterday. Interested crowds have been inspecting the big marine mammal during its stay here. Entire classes of several schools have passed around the glass and steel housing under which the 65-ton creature lies on display and listened to the lecture by Captain Harry S. White.


The 130 pupils of the school for the deaf at Vancouver inspected the whale Friday, and instructors translated the lecture into the sign language for-the deaf.               .


The whale being exhibited is of the baleen or whalebone variety and it is so placed that the function of the whalebone in the mouth is apparent.

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