Date   

Re: placard holders-tack boards

Tony Thompson
 

Mont Switzer wrote:

I'm sure you are aware that some roads (NKP, C&O, MWR to name 3) mounted their door tack boards off center toward the opening so a man standing in the car could reach the tack board.  I like to install placards on these car doors as if a man standing in the car and reaching around did the work.  That makes the placards crooked and oriented toward the door opening even further.  

     THis is like my approach to route cards: photos rarely show them squared up on the board, so I almost never apply one squared up.

Jaeger used to make a nice selection of placards, but last time I looked they had been dropped from their line.

   Yes, a very useful set, of which my stash luckily still contains plenty. I usually apply door placards only to one side of the car. On my layout, you only ever see one side of cars, so the one-side placard provides me a restricted-service and a general-service car all in one, just by rotating the car.

Tony


Re: Photo: GN Combination Door Boxcar 12217

Benjamin Hom
 

Mel Perry asked:
"can anyone identify the mopac boxcar
in the photo, it appears to be a 1937 car?"

R+3/4 improved Dreadnaught end, so definitely not a prewar boxcar.  MP 38372, from MP 37975-38524, built 11-58, details on Hawkins spreadsheet here:


Ben Hom


Re: Photo: GN Combination Door Boxcar 12217

mel perry
 

can anyone identify the mopac boxcar
in the photo, it appears to be a 1937 car?
thanks
mel perry


Re: Photo: GN Combination Door Boxcar 12217

Bruce Smith
 

To the left is the end of PRR X43A #603117, built circa 1952, and 9 years later, desperately in need of new paint.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 12:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: GN Combination Door Boxcar 12217
 

Photo: GN Combination Door Boxcar 12217

A 1959 photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A4590

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: placard holders-tack boards

Mont Switzer
 

Tony,

 

This has been a favorite topic as I have been adding placards and car routing cards where appropriate as part of my final detailing process.  Even on cars that have neither, I like at add residue:  scraps of former placards or route cards.  I chop up bits of paper with a razor blade until I get a fine confetti.  Add this to a little dab or Elmer's glue and mission accomplished.

 

I'm sure you are aware that some roads (NKP, C&O, MWR to name 3) mounted their door tack boards off center toward the opening so a man standing in the car could reach the tack board.  I like to install placards on these car doors as if a man standing in the car and reaching around did the work.  That makes the placards crooked and oriented toward the door opening even further.  

 

Jaeger used to make a nice selection of placards, but last time I looked they had been dropped from their line.

 

Mont Switzer 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Tony Thompson [tony@...]
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 1:33 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

Mont Switzer wrote:

I doubt the display portion of hazardous materials placarding regulations have changed all that much over the years.  You could get away with covering a hazardous placard over, but if no covering is available, "when the freight comes off the placard comes off" unless it is a tank car or a car with containers that have residue in them.

   I am sure this is true for hazardous placards, but I was thinking of the many OTHER placards that are used, from "unload other side" and "canned goods" or "frozen food," to "caution - auto parts."

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Cartoon Cars

Eric Hansmann
 

It looks like a few cars have advertising banners attached to the car sides. There are words and illustrations.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 12:51 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Cartoon Cars

 

Photo: Cartoon Cars

A circa 1884-1885 photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/lsu-sc-noe%3A118

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Not a great photo but what were cartoon cars?

Maybe something to do with the World's Industrial & Cotton Centennial Exposition in 1884-1885?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: UMM Tools

gtws00
 

I have all four versions of these. I 1st started with the short one to bend PE stiles. I liked it so much I bought the longer version. These 1st ones did not have the bending brake, but when UMM-USA offered them with the brake I ordered those as well. I use are four of they. The ones without the bending brake can be used as a vise to hold some thin materials as you work on them. I will have a tutorial in part two of my IC Mini-Kit Clinic when presented at the next Virtual RPM.
Attached is a picture of the 4 benders and a small brass angle that is .040x.040 made with the benders

I also use the CA applicators from UMM-USA and my favorites from the Glue Loopers

George Toman


Re: Photo: IC Boxcar 340844 & Others

Steve SANDIFER
 

Note the stock pen. The first class ballast.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 12:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: IC Boxcar 340844 & Others

 

Photo: IC Boxcar 340844 & Others

A 1932 photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/ulm-p120701coll10%3A200

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Cartoon Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Cartoon Cars

A circa 1884-1885 photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/lsu-sc-noe%3A118

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Not a great photo but what were cartoon cars?

Maybe something to do with the World's Industrial & Cotton Centennial Exposition in 1884-1885?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: IC Drop-Bottom Gondola Interior

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: IC Drop-Bottom Gondola Interior

An undated photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A5198


    I love the battered drop doors. Does anyone model this?

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: IC Drop-Bottom Gondola Interior

gary laakso
 

The B&O gon in front of the IC one, REALLY had a side bulge accident. 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 10:43 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: IC Drop-Bottom Gondola Interior

 

Photo: IC Drop-Bottom Gondola Interior

An undated photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A5198

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Some of the doors appear damaged.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: GN Combination Door Boxcar 12217

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: GN Combination Door Boxcar 12217

A 1959 photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A4590

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Rock Island Furniture Boxcar 61461

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Rock Island Furniture Boxcar 61461

An undated photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A10438

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: IC Drop-Bottom Gondola Interior

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: IC Drop-Bottom Gondola Interior

An undated photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A5198

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Some of the doors appear damaged.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: N&W Door-And-A-Half Boxcar 511751

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: N&W Door-And-A-Half Boxcar 511751

An undated photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A8172

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

I could be off on the car number.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: IC Boxcar 340844 & Others

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: IC Boxcar 340844 & Others

A 1932 photo from the Louisiana Digital Library:

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/ulm-p120701coll10%3A200

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Click on the photo and scroll.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

Tony Thompson
 

Mont Switzer wrote:

I doubt the display portion of hazardous materials placarding regulations have changed all that much over the years.  You could get away with covering a hazardous placard over, but if no covering is available, "when the freight comes off the placard comes off" unless it is a tank car or a car with containers that have residue in them.

   I am sure this is true for hazardous placards, but I was thinking of the many OTHER placards that are used, from "unload other side" and "canned goods" or "frozen food," to "caution - auto parts."

Tony Thompson




Re: UMM Tools

Craig Zeni
 

On Jun 15, 2020, at 6:08 AM, main@RealSTMFC.groups.io wrote:


3c.
From: Steve and Barb Hile <shile@mindspring.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2020 02:12:34 EDT

Although most seem to currently sold out, I have liked using the micro chisels for removing plastic molded details. Much easier than working with the chisel blade Xacto.



http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_224 <http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_224&products_id=8285> &products_id=8285



Steve Hile
I bought one of the UMM saws a few years ago after hearing Greg Martin rave about it. I wasn't disappointed at all. It's an amazing thing and I'm now the guy that raves about them. The UMM saw and some high quality Dumont & FIls tweezers are called out in my resin building presentation and another one that I do that's too modern and not age appropriate here.

The chisel tools that I have converted to, and never looked back, are those from Hasegawa. There's several sizes; the 3mm wide TT-9 "Hasegawa Trytool" is my favorite. The width of the blade makes it harder to accidentally rotate it and create collateral damage. The round TT-5 is my second favorite. The way its tip is cut makes it ideal for going in and nicking off rivets or whatever that are in hard to reach places. I also bought the narrower flat chisel and the 'triangular' chisel - I've not found them to be as useful as the TT-9 and TT-5. MIne came from store.spruebrothers.com ...but it looks like the TT-9 is out of stock right now. With a little practice and care, I've found that I can shave off unwanted details and literally not have to do any clean up with a file or 1000 grit paper. I had to remove the rear overhang from a Highliners F unit shell. In the past I've have used the UMM saw and come back with some 600 and 1000 grit to clean it up. I used the TT-9 and made probably a dozen passes, peeling up a curl of plastic with every pass. It finished clean and needed zero sanding work. The tools are that sharp and good.

At the same web page is the Trumpeter brand of chisels - I tried a couple. Not impressed. At all. Didn't feel sharp, didn't handle well.


Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Re: UMM Tools

Ken Adams
 

Modify the um-usa url's to HTTPS so you won't get nasty messages about unsecure sites. 

Very interesting stuff. There goes the last of the $1200 virus giveaway.  Tool stuff that Micro-Mark doesn't do. Will admit to being a bit of a micro tool guy...But on my very limited active workspace I find I spend a lot of time trying to remember where that tool I need now is hiding.
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek


Re: UMM Tools

steve_wintner
 

Oh, interesting. 

The ones I have aren't a loop. The are an open end,   more like your needle. Allows me to reach in and drop a dot of CA right around the grab wire just above where it enters the hole. The CA then flows down into the hole, very neat. The CA then dries in the applicator before I can remove it, of course. But a candle flame fixes that. 

http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_113&products_id=6487

I'm sure the loop is good too, maybe better for some applications - I think I'll give them a try, thanks for pointing them out!

I've also used the Small Shops bug, as Dave P mentioned. Very nice. But I currently have one particular bend that it cannot do - UMMs 150mm bender, the one Jim mentioned, looks like a good bet. 

Steve W

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