Date   

Re: Photo: Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Jun 28, 2020, at 11:09, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA
A circa 1910-1920 photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bennetthall/9535159122/in/album-72157624912254584/
Click on the photo to enlarge it.
An industry probably served by the Southern Pacific.
I wonder if the cars on the lower elevation track(s) are loading pulp... and if so whither it might be bound.


Re: Photo: Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Jun 28, 2020, at 11:08, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad
A circa 1906 photo from the Detroit Publishing Co:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bennetthall/9209902079/in/album-72157634496066101/
Click on the photo to enlarge it.
Older freight cars and locomotives.
That plume coming out of the goat's safety looks just like a wisp of cotton!
(On the other hand the fireman seems to need some unpaid time off for overfiring.)


Re: Car weighting

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Jun 28, 2020, at 10:53, Bud Rindfleisch <BlackDiamondRR@gmail.com> wrote:

Tim O,
Great observations, especially about coupling onto a light car and having it fly away! Sure takes away all that detailed realism built into our models.
Bud Rindfleisch
I got my start in HO before Kadee™ magnetics and Lindberg™ Delrin™ trucks arrived on the scene, and when I first experienced both of them on the same car I entered the land of Utter Frustration™. I quicky repurposed my uncoupling pick to double as a hold-fast and haven't turned back.


Re: Car weighting

Eric Hansmann
 

Schuyler,

 

I have operated my lighter models on a couple different club layouts with various grades and train lengths up to 30-35 cars without an issue. My freight cars have been mixed in with others weighing closer to the NMRA recommendations.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2020 1:25 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Car weighting

 

That’s fine, Eric, but what happens when you take your equipment to another layout?  I don’t even HAVE a home layout (yet) but I’m a member of a major club, the North Shore Model Railroad Club (www.nsmrc.org ) and one of the major issues that arise in ops there are cars that are either under or (far) over weight standards.  OK, fine, the weight recommendations in the RP.  Whatever, as I said before, it is a (de facto) standard.

 

Schuyler


Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA

Andy Carlson
 

Going by the brick structure, this is the Oxnard brothers' sugar plant. Located very close to where the current Ventura County Ry connects to the SP, within rock throwing distance to the Oxnard train station. Plant was torn down, I believe, in the 1950s.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 11:41:11 AM PDT, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA
A circa 1910-1920 photo:
Click on the photo to enlarge it.
An industry probably served by the Southern Pacific.

   Nice view of a string of Blackburn beet racks, an HO model of which is now being produced by Owl Mountain Models.

Tony Thompson




Re: Car weighting

fire5506
 

I looked at https://www.Imperialsupplies.com website and they also have stickon wheel weights in 1/4 OZ sizes that are not lead and can be shipped to California.


Richard Webster


Re: Photo: Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA
A circa 1910-1920 photo:
Click on the photo to enlarge it.
An industry probably served by the Southern Pacific.

   Nice view of a string of Blackburn beet racks, an HO model of which is now being produced by Owl Mountain Models.

Tony Thompson




Photo: Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unloading Sugar Beets, Oxnard, CA

A circa 1910-1920 photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bennetthall/9535159122/in/album-72157624912254584/

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

An industry probably served by the Southern Pacific.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad

A circa 1906 photo from the Detroit Publishing Co:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bennetthall/9209902079/in/album-72157634496066101/

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Older freight cars and locomotives.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Car weighting

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Tim O,
     Great observations, especially about coupling onto a light car and having it fly away! Sure takes away all that detailed realism built into our models.
     Bud Rindfleisch


Re: ICC Freight Commodity Statistics

Jack Mullen
 

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 07:04 AM, akerboomk wrote:
what is "Naval Stores"???
The generic term for resin products, so called for the early primary use in wooden ship construction and maintenance. Includes turpentine, pitch, rosin and tar.

Jack Mullen


Re: Car weighting

william darnaby
 

I forgot to mention...cause it was late...resin gons get .020 lead sheet, hammered from .040 from McMaster-Carr, between the floor and underbody.  Years ago I standardized on Intermountain wheel sets, first the old wide wheels and then the .088"s.  In addition, everything gets 2-56 truck screws that are initially cranked town snug.  The B end then gets backed off a quarter turn and the A end gets backed off 3 quarters of a turn.  This promotes tracking without having the car tip back and forth.  I use rail sizes from code 40 to 83 on the railroad and have no issues.

Bill Darnaby

On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 09:29:55 AM CDT, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:


You’re pretty close to the NMRA recommendation  for a forty foot house car with metal wheels. I use seven of the ¼ oz. tire weights, and that’s very close to the recommendation. For those not familiar with the formula, it’s one ounce plus ½ oz. per inch of car length, so a 40 ft. house car would weigh 3.5 oz. It’ s better to be a little over than a little under, and some clubs have their own standards like La Mesa, which includes rollability and tipping in addition to car weight. Car weight isn’t a critical operational feature unless you run very long trains on horseshoe curves, but the minimum weight should be at least 3.25 oz. for good tracking. I’ve operated 80 plus car trains on the 2% grades on the Tehachapi, and that’s true test of car trackability.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of william darnaby
Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2020 10:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Car weighting

 

I have never paid any attention to the NMRA weighting recommendations and couldn't begin to say what they are.  For styrene cars I use what I am given.  For resin cars of any kind I use I use six of the 1/4 oz. sticky weights in a strip.  Exceptions would be resin flat cars which get what ever fits underneath and resin hoppers which get basically nothing beyond trucks and couplers.  I also run empty Kadee 2-bay hoppers with no added weight.  I have no derailment issues.  Carefully laid track helps.

 

Bill Darnaby 

 


Re: Car weighting

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 6/28/2020 7:29 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
You’re pretty close to the NMRA recommendation  for a forty foot house car with metal wheels

    For those interested in lead stickon's see below.  However they won't ship to CA and a few other states.

https://www.imperialsupplies.com/item/0798580

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Corrections/Additions to Reweigh Symbols list

James Brewer
 

All,

Thanks to those who have provided additions and corrections to the reweigh station symbols list recently posted.  I have incorporated all that I have received and anticipate uploading the revised file after 4th of July weekend.

If you haven't sent me your additions/corrections yet, please do so.

Thanks!

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD


Re: Car weighting

Nelson Moyer
 

You’re pretty close to the NMRA recommendation  for a forty foot house car with metal wheels. I use seven of the ¼ oz. tire weights, and that’s very close to the recommendation. For those not familiar with the formula, it’s one ounce plus ½ oz. per inch of car length, so a 40 ft. house car would weigh 3.5 oz. It’ s better to be a little over than a little under, and some clubs have their own standards like La Mesa, which includes rollability and tipping in addition to car weight. Car weight isn’t a critical operational feature unless you run very long trains on horseshoe curves, but the minimum weight should be at least 3.25 oz. for good tracking. I’ve operated 80 plus car trains on the 2% grades on the Tehachapi, and that’s true test of car trackability.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of william darnaby
Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2020 10:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Car weighting

 

I have never paid any attention to the NMRA weighting recommendations and couldn't begin to say what they are.  For styrene cars I use what I am given.  For resin cars of any kind I use I use six of the 1/4 oz. sticky weights in a strip.  Exceptions would be resin flat cars which get what ever fits underneath and resin hoppers which get basically nothing beyond trucks and couplers.  I also run empty Kadee 2-bay hoppers with no added weight.  I have no derailment issues.  Carefully laid track helps.

 

Bill Darnaby 

 


ICC Freight Commodity Statistics

akerboomk
 

For those interested, I have compiled *all* the statistics for the B&M, for the years they published individual RR data (1917-1963) (plus 1914-1916 regional/national data)
NOTE: Even if you aren't interested in the B&M...I include the following more general data (see right-most columns):
1) Eastern District (early years) or New England Region (later years) data
2) National "loads originated" data

The Excel file is available here:
https://www.bmrrhs.org/s/BnM_ICC_Frt_Comm_Stat_All-yn9r.xls

Each year is a "tab" at the bottom (worksheet)
There are some examples of how to use Excel to create charts for traffic over time (see rows on each sheet down below row 300, and worksheets after the "[19]63" worksheet).

And some discussion about the ICC commodity data is here:
https://www.bmrrhs.org/icc_freight_commodity_statistics
(or at least read the info in the "00-Notes" worksheet)

If anyone is interested in compiling their own railroad's data, feel free to use this as a template
Constructive criticism always welcome.. Particularly if you know the documents/regulations that governed what was included in each commodity (e.g. what is "Naval Stores"???)
--
Ken Akerboom


Re: Photos: PFE 36624 (R-40-2)

Bruce Smith
 

This R-40-2 retains it's applied metal emblem.

Regards,
Bruce 
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Dave Parker via groups.io <spottab@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 28, 2020 12:11 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: PFE 36624 (R-40-2)
 
You can actually read the date on the brake service stencil -- looks like 10-1-40 (or maybe 10-4-40).  K brakes had to be serviced every 15 months at this time, so that narrows the date of the photo better than if you could see the reweigh stencil.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Car weighting

Tim O'Connor
 


Having observed truck performance for over 50 years I think the NMRA recommended
weights give the best long term results for tracking, rolling resistance, wear & tear, coupling
inertia (ever couple into a car and send it flying?), and resistance to 'wobbling' or rocking


On 6/26/2020 9:17 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Bruce Metcalf wrote:

I use the NMRA weights in HO. I have also found that when there are problems, it's not the absolute weight, but combinations of light and heavy cars in one train. That, or putting light cars or just too many cars around too-tight curves.

     There were studies in the model magazines back in the 1950s that concluded (possibly correctly) that the biggest factor in car weight performance was CONSISTENT car weight. As Bruce says, mixing heavier and lighter cars can bite you. I think one could very probably choose a weight below the NMRA weight now recommended, but the key would be, again, to STICK to that weight and get as close as you can with every car.
      I continue to use the NMRA weight, but then again, I don't have any heavy grades that can hurt locomotive performance.

Tony Thompson

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photos: PFE 36624 (R-40-2)

Bill Welch
 

Who owns the tooling for the ex-Red Caboose PRR style trucks?

Bill Welch


Re: Photos: PFE 36624 (R-40-2)

 

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 06:54 PM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
( snip )
Photos: PFE 36624 (R-40-2)

Undated photos from the Library of Congress, probably from the early 1940s:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017812535/


In Ted's recent blog post on his site, he goes over the PRR 2D-F8 truck variants in some detail, I suggest all interested take a look.

http://prototopics.blogspot.com/

In it, he mentions the ARA variant used on PFE reefers and in the above link from Bob, the PFE reefer has an ARA type Y truck as mentioned in Ted's blog.
In the TIFF version you can zoom in quite well on this interesting truck.

The one on this PFE reefer looks to have a lateral motion device, something not shown in Ted's blog.

On a side note, if anyone on this list has extra or unneeded RC X29 trucks they don't need or want, I and someone else on this list would like to get them.
We could put them to use.

Regards,
Dan Smith



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