Date   

Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 


Lobsters and other fish went in EXPRESS REEFERS. And when lobsters were shipped ALIVE
they could indeed be sent all the way from Maine to California, even in steam days.



On 7/8/2020 9:28 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io wrote:
Doug,

I rather doubt that fresh lobsters would make it live to the West Coast by rail, based on years of eating them on Cape Ann north of Boston where my grandparents had a summer house, and on average transit times for freight coast to coast.  Specialty paper is more likely.  Champion Paper Mills in Lowell or Lawrence (I forget which) made high grade coated paper for the National Geographic magazine in the 1950s (I toured their mill as a high schooler), so I could conceive of such a load being shipped from MA to the PacNW to a specialty printer.  I'm sure Seattle or Portland had at least one of those. 

I'll try to think of other commodities that might work.  There had to be specialty manufactured items made in cities around Boston, including Lawrence, Lowell,  Worcester, Framingham, Fitchburg and the like that had national distribution.

Todd Sullivan

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 


Tony, BAR reefers continued to be used for California produce at least into the mid 1970's.


On 7/8/2020 9:25 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Doug Paasch wrote:

I have been looking at how to justify a BAR reefer and some BM cars to appear on my Seattle layout and any more ideas would be welcome.  All I can think of for a BAR reefer is fresh lobster?  I like the idea of the BM car carrying B&M beans to some grocery distributors, too.

    Remember that for awhile in the '50's BAR loaned its reefers to PFE from June 1 to October 1. So there you are! California vegetable or oranges, fresh to Seattle!

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 


Don't forget clothespins!! Before dryers, everyone needed a lot of clothespins. :-)

The Maine Central actually rebuilt 50 ton open hoppers into covered hoppers for clothespins!




On 7/8/2020 10:03 PM, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:
It is possible that specialty wood items were shipped from New England to the west coast. I’m think of turned wooden thread spools, maybe even toothpicks. Yes the PNW had much lumber, but maybe not the right species for various items. And yes there were and are plenty of paper mills here, but maybe not making the right kind of paper for specialty uses. And the idea of textiles is great. Think of those huge textile mills like in Lowell. 


On Jul 8, 2020, at 6:44 PM, Doug Paasch <drpaasch@...> wrote:



Thanks all for your info/ideas!


On Jul 8, 2020 7:29 PM, "Todd Sullivan via groups.io" <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Well, now, that's a darned sneaky solution to Doug's problem!

Todd Sullivan


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Wanting to model accurate watermelon loads

Charles Etheredge
 

Right on Don.   Somewhere I have a picture of a whole string of horse-pulled wagons lined up waiting to unload their wagons into TNO cattle calls.  That was in Hempstead, Tx.  also.


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Richard Townsend
 

It is possible that specialty wood items were shipped from New England to the west coast. I’m think of turned wooden thread spools, maybe even toothpicks. Yes the PNW had much lumber, but maybe not the right species for various items. And yes there were and are plenty of paper mills here, but maybe not making the right kind of paper for specialty uses. And the idea of textiles is great. Think of those huge textile mills like in Lowell. 


On Jul 8, 2020, at 6:44 PM, Doug Paasch <drpaasch@...> wrote:



Thanks all for your info/ideas!


On Jul 8, 2020 7:29 PM, "Todd Sullivan via groups.io" <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Well, now, that's a darned sneaky solution to Doug's problem!

Todd Sullivan


Re: wanting to model accuate watermelon loads

Richard Townsend
 

There was an article in RMC a few years ago on making a watermelon 🍉 load for ventilated box cars.


On Jul 8, 2020, at 6:07 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



I think air hardening green modeling clay is your best bet. You can probably roll a hundred melons
while watching a 1 hour TV show.

On 7/8/2020 5:22 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Two views for those wanting to model accuate watermelon loads for their steam era freight cars...
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: UNION TEXAS NATURAL GAS tank car and WFE wood ice reefer

David Soderblom
 

Tony:

Not just raining, but a hard rain that splashed and soaked.  Just to keep you miserable.



David Soderblom




--
David Soderblom
Baltimore MD
david.soderblom@...


Re: Wanting to model accurate watermelon loads

Don Hand
 

Group - One good reference is the article, Moving Melons by Rail, by David Steer, Railroad Model Craftsman, Jan. 2014. More about the cars is in Ventilated Box Car, by Robert L. Hundman, Mainline Modeler, Apr. 2006.

I live in Hempstead, Texas, which was the watermelon shipping capital of the U.S., prior to 194O.  Although, surviving photos show watermelons being shipped primarily in T&NO stock cars.

Don Hand


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Doug Paasch
 

Thanks all for your info/ideas!


On Jul 8, 2020 7:29 PM, "Todd Sullivan via groups.io" <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Well, now, that's a darned sneaky solution to Doug's problem!

Todd Sullivan


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Carbon Black Car?

mopacfirst
 

Steve is right, and remember in the steam era there were a lot more refineries than in later years, but of course they were much smaller, which probably makes them more suitable for modeling.  Another point to remember model-wise is that only a relatively small portion of the plot is taken up with process units, with much more of the acreage occupied by the tank farm, which is where the loading racks would be anyway.  A typical refinery might have one or two lead tracks extending into the process areas if that happens to be where the plant storehouse is (receiving materials), but most of the trackage is at the very edges of the plot.

Ron Merrick, piping engineer


Photos: Cotton Transportation

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: Cotton Transportation

Photos from the Jackson County Historical Society:

Circa 1910 – Loading cotton at railroad depot, Tupelo

https://jacksonhistory.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/103.jpg

Train Load of Cotton from Newport Arkansas

https://jacksonhistory.net/train-load-of-cotton-from-newport-arkansas/

Bob Chaparro

 

Hemet, CA

 


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Todd Sullivan
 

Well, now, that's a darned sneaky solution to Doug's problem!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Todd Sullivan
 

Doug,

I rather doubt that fresh lobsters would make it live to the West Coast by rail, based on years of eating them on Cape Ann north of Boston where my grandparents had a summer house, and on average transit times for freight coast to coast.  Specialty paper is more likely.  Champion Paper Mills in Lowell or Lawrence (I forget which) made high grade coated paper for the National Geographic magazine in the 1950s (I toured their mill as a high schooler), so I could conceive of such a load being shipped from MA to the PacNW to a specialty printer.  I'm sure Seattle or Portland had at least one of those. 

I'll try to think of other commodities that might work.  There had to be specialty manufactured items made in cities around Boston, including Lawrence, Lowell,  Worcester, Framingham, Fitchburg and the like that had national distribution.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tony Thompson
 

Doug Paasch wrote:

I have been looking at how to justify a BAR reefer and some BM cars to appear on my Seattle layout and any more ideas would be welcome.  All I can think of for a BAR reefer is fresh lobster?  I like the idea of the BM car carrying B&M beans to some grocery distributors, too.

    Remember that for awhile in the '50's BAR loaned its reefers to PFE from June 1 to October 1. So there you are! California vegetable or oranges, fresh to Seattle!

Tony Thompson




Re: wanting to model accuate watermelon loads

Tim O'Connor
 


I think air hardening green modeling clay is your best bet. You can probably roll a hundred melons
while watching a 1 hour TV show.

On 7/8/2020 5:22 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Two views for those wanting to model accuate watermelon loads for their steam era freight cars...
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Doug Paasch
 

They wouldn't ship spuds or cranberries from Maine to the west coast as Washington and Idaho are spud country, and Washington and Oregon grow cranberries (Ocean Spray).  But B&M beans are THE best and certainly were shipped to the west!

Paper not likely as Washington had gobs of paper mills.  But I have been looking at how to justify a BAR reefer and some BM cars to appear on my Seattle layout and any more ideas would be welcome.  All I can think of for a BAR reefer is fresh lobster?  I like the idea of the BM car carrying B&M beans to some grocery distributors, too.

  Doug Paasch


On Jul 8, 2020 5:05 PM, "Andy Brusgard" <ajb1102@...> wrote:
Potatoes!!! 


Hindsight update

Ted Culotta
 

Meant to send this here, but absentmindedly sent it to the old Yahoo group. Anyway....

As mentioned during Hindsight 20/20, we will be conducting some weeknight clinics, as well as further iterations of Hindsight 20/20. The first weeknight clinic is listed below. Our next Hindsight 20/20 event, "Hindsight 20/20-2.0" will be on August 22. Details will follow in the next couple of weeks, including the lineup of clinicians along with information about how to register. 

Because we are using zoom, we can accommodate almost 500 attendees. However, that comes with some additional costs (~$65 US per month). We are NOT going to request money for any events. However, we will set up a "tip jar" where you can send paypal donations to help defray costs. Any extra funds will be used to provide an honorarium to our speakers (the three of us excepted). We will keep the zoom registration and the "tip jar" with different individuals to remain as above-board and independent as possible.

Lightroom for Model Railroaders, including live demonstrations - Ted Culotta
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 8:00 PM - 9:30 PM EDT
This discussion will demonstrate how to use LR to manage and catalog photos, drawings, articles, etc.

You may register for the clinic at www.speedwitchmedia.com

Hunter, Ryan, and Ted

Ted Culotta
Speedwitch Media
P.O. Box 392, Guilford, CT 06437


Re: UNION TEXAS NATURAL GAS tank car and WFE wood ice reefer

Ted Culotta
 

True on the New Haven. There was the 2-10-2 (hauling Steam Era freight cars... did I stay outta jail Mike?) that threw a tire while on the Poughkeepsie Bridge (gantlet tracked so there was no pulling up alongside with a crane) on a bitter, bitter cold night. The tire had to be sweated back on manually on the bridge.

Ted Culotta
Speedwitch Media
P.O. Box 392, Guilford, CT 06437


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Andy Brusgard
 

Potatoes!!! 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Rails and Hoists for Spools of Rayon

Drew M.
 

American Viscose's first plant was located in Marcus Hook, PA. There is more info here:

as well as at oldchesterpa.com

Drew Marshall

Modeling the pre-Depression years.

Sent from TypeApp

On Jul 8, 2020, at 17:55, Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...> wrote:
There was a large rayon factory (American Viscose Corp.) in Front Royal, Virginia, served by the Norfolk & Western Railway - which was controlled by the Pennsylvania Railroad during our time period.

Ken Montero

On 07/08/2020 4:08 PM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Rayon was made from cellulose fiber, and I know there were mills in the Pacific NW in NW Washington State served by the Northern Pacific and in W Va served by the Western Maryland, IIRC.  I'd be wondering if the PRR cars were for another mill, perhaps in the Northern Tier of Pa which was heavily forested.

Todd Sullivan