Date   

Re: Chicago-Cleveland Viking outside metal roof

James Brewer
 

I'm not certain this is the "same" type of Viking roof used by the SP, but this one was used on a few classes of N&W boxcars:

https://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=3680

Jim Brewer


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Another product : wooden kitchen matches. EVERYONE needed them. One of the match makers had
an enormous factory near Duluth-Superior but there must have been others.

   There were at least two match factories in California in the WW II era.

Tony Thompson




Re: Chicago-Cleveland Viking outside metal roof

Rich C
 

That roof is interesting to me. It is a very early Viking. Please send me some roof shots before you attach the running board. I want to modify one of my spare flat roofs for a Maine Central X29.

Thanks in advance, my friend

On Thursday, July 9, 2020, 11:00:52 AM CDT, Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472@...> wrote:


Hi

I am building a Sunshine SP B50-14 with a Hutchins roof I already have two with Hutchins roofs and have two more to build again with Hutchins roofs what I would like to do is to build one of them with a Chicago-Cleveland Viking outside metal roof could I do this using the Hutchins roof as a starting point? Photos would also help.

Many thanks
Paul Doggett.    England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿



Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Lee Thwaits
 

There was (is?) a large Diamond Match mill in Chico, CA making matchsticks & toothpicks ( plus other products), enough to supply most of the west.

Lee Thwaits


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 


Also, during the frequent "car shortages" experienced by postwar railroads, I think it's a very good bet
that if a car was suitable, and was needed for an online customer, then the reporting marks were of no
consequence whatever.

The GN would HOARD it own box cars prior to the grain harvest, and spot them everywhere online
near grain elevators. And since GN was always griping about the online/offline imbalance of cars due to
slow returns, I think it's a safe bet the GN assigned other railroads' cars without regard to the "rules"
(which were really just guidelines anyway) -- at least before the grain harvest.




On 7/8/2020 1:22 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
R J Dial wrote:

I've seen pics of BAR and B&M boxcars in LA and Seattle. Stuck in my mind as always wondered what would be shipped from corner to corner of the US like that. They may have been WWII photos, but can't recall for sure.

     You're assuming they were loaded by the home road and sent to the West Coast. More likely they were loaded SOMEWHERE in the U.S. and sent there. For example, the car in Seattle might have come from LA or Houston. Car Service Rules would not encourage westward movements of those cars, of course, but after WW II, the AAR surveys found that only about 2/3 of car movements were in accord with those Rules, so there is a lot of scope for "exceptions," though they really are not even exceptions.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: UNION TEXAS NATURAL GAS tank car and WFE wood ice reefer

Tim O'Connor
 


EGADS! That sounds movie-worthy! I get vertigo just thinking about it.

On 7/8/2020 8:04 PM, Ted Culotta wrote:
True on the New Haven. There was the 2-10-2 (hauling Steam Era freight cars... did I stay outta jail Mike?) that threw a tire while on the Poughkeepsie Bridge (gantlet tracked so there was no pulling up alongside with a crane) on a bitter, bitter cold night. The tire had to be sweated back on manually on the bridge.

Ted Culotta


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: UTLX 96720

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Tim,

Yes, it is an ACF car and is represented by the Kadee model.  All the Kadee ICC 105A-300W tank cars are listed as Discontinued, and there are no large images of the models on their website, so it's a bit hard to tell exactly.  The other model that is of an ACF ICC 105 is by Atlas.  Not as well detailed nor as pricey, but still a good model.  I noticed that both models have ACF builder's marks stenciled on the center sill.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 


I was very surprised to learn that Idaho Potatoes with those wonderful brown skins.. are actually
treated with SULFURIC ACID sprayed onto the fields. The skins are a defense! :-D

I don't know how far back that goes, but it's definitely been done for a while now.

On 7/8/2020 11:23 PM, akerboomk wrote:

RE: B&M cars.

There’s always the Jones and Lamson Machine Tool works from Springfield VT (Shipped on the Springfield Terminal)  Sending machine tools to Boeing (or some aviation supplier)?

 

Re: Potatoes

Were the same varieties of potatoes grown in Idaho & Maine?  I’ve no idea what kinds were grown in Maine.  My image of an Idaho potato is just the Russets, but that may be more out of ignorance (maybe I should look at the bags, next time I’m in the store ;-) than any actual knowledge of what varieties are/were grown in Idaho.

 

RE: National “pools” of cars

Boxcars and flat cars were truly national pools.  There’s  a bunch of instances in ORERs where the B&M was renumbering cars and had pleas to “send our cars home so they can get renumbered”.

Then there’s the saga of flat 33509:

            https://www.bmrrhs.org/s/BMRRM_33509_flatcar.pdf

 

[from the B&M RR Magazine July, 1951 (vol 19 No. 7)]


Ken Akerboom

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 


Different varieties.

On 7/8/2020 11:23 PM, BillM wrote:

FEC shipped potatoes from the 5th district south of Miami and also the Hastings area.

Bill Michael

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Andy Brusgard
Sent: July 8, 2020 7:05 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

 

Potatoes!!! 



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Chicago-Cleveland Viking outside metal roof

Paul Doggett
 

Hi

I am building a Sunshine SP B50-14 with a Hutchins roof I already have two with Hutchins roofs and have two more to build again with Hutchins roofs what I would like to do is to build one of them with a Chicago-Cleveland Viking outside metal roof could I do this using the Hutchins roof as a starting point? Photos would also help.

Many thanks
Paul Doggett. England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 


Another product : wooden kitchen matches. EVERYONE needed them. One of the match makers had
an enormous factory near Duluth-Superior but there must have been others.

There's a lot of pine in New England too - but the really good stuff was removed in colonial days - for ship masts!
The second and third growth forests are mostly for paper and pulp.

Oh, another New England forest product to this day - hardwood FLOORING lumber. Lots of it. Oak. Maple.

And of course - wood furniture.



On 7/8/2020 11:13 PM, Doug Paasch wrote:

Good thought on the lumber.  The PNW is almost all softwood.  Hardwoods would need to come from the east, like maple (duh!), red & white oak, black walnut, etc.  Toothpicks, clothes pins, and textiles (especially woolens) are possibilities.  And manufactured goods, too.

 

Thanks for more ideas.  This is great!

 

  Doug Paasch



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


UTLX 96720

Tim O'Connor
 


So is this UTLX tank car an ACF product? Does it match the Kadee model?

And check the roof on the lumber box car - Evidently a Milwaukee rib side car. :-)


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Wanting to model accurate watermelon loads

Rick Naylor
 

Muscatine Melon: A Case Study of a Place-based Food in Iowa Susan Futrell – One Backyard Consulting, Iowa City, Iowa and Craig Chase – ISU Extension Farm Management, Waterloo, Iowa
core.ac.uk


By 1921, production of melons from Muscatine County totaled 750 carloads of watermelon, produced on around 2000 acres of land; and 100 carloads of muskmelon and cantaloupe, grown on around 500 acres. The 1925 Iowa State Vegetable Growers Association reported that Hal Wolford of Conesville was growing Hales Best and Perfectos: “The biggest benefit over California melons is that they are vine-ripened close to market.” It took approximately 12 days for the melons to reach the East Coast from the West Coast, whereas it took about six to eight days from Iowa (Iowa State Vegetable Growers Association Annual Report, 1925). Truck growers at this point used domestic farm labor for producing and harvesting, and any other labor needed came from the city of Muscatine. Most of the vegetables were marketed in Chicago, St. Louis, Memphis, New Orleans, and the Twin Cities. Chicago was a 12-hour run by railroad; St. Louis, Kansas City and New Orleans were on direct rail lines, which offered good transportation facilities to the area growers. The Growers Association also reported for the first time in 1925 that Iowa cantaloupes were shipped to New York in carlots.


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Don Hand <donlhand@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 8, 2020 8:46 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wanting to model accurate watermelon loads
 
Group - One good reference is the article, Moving Melons by Rail, by David Steer, Railroad Model Craftsman, Jan. 2014. More about the cars is in Ventilated Box Car, by Robert L. Hundman, Mainline Modeler, Apr. 2006.

I live in Hempstead, Texas, which was the watermelon shipping capital of the U.S., prior to 194O.  Although, surviving photos show watermelons being shipped primarily in T&NO stock cars.

Don Hand


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Parker wrote:

One more time guys.  Prior to about 1942, there wasn't any such thing as a "free runner"
 
  I would make the same case here:  it is very unlikely that they wandered down the coast having been loaded in Seattle.  That's much more of a 1945+ scenario.

   Not sure where this comes from. The Car Service Rules as we know them were adopted by AAR in 1934, and were described as codifying principles already largely in operation.

Tony Thompson




Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Parker wrote:

One more time guys.  Prior to about 1942, there wasn't any such thing as a "free runner"

 Then why are the same Car Service Rules in the back of ORER issues prior to 1942?

Tony Thompson




Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Rails and Hoists for Spools of Rayon

tmkprr1954
 

Kenneth Montero wrote
Jul 8  

"There was a large rayon factory (American Viscose Corp.) in Front Royal, Virginia, served by the Norfolk & Western Railway - which was controlled by the Pennsylvania Railroad during our time period."

The January ORER also has 34 N&W boxcars (50500-51999 series) equipped with "Rayon Yarn Beams".

I also found 10 B&O cars (467000-46799 series) equipped "for handling tire cord yarn".

This would echo Bruce's understanding of rayon use in our era.

Still looking for more references in the ORER!

Tom Kane
Modelling the PRR in 1954 (ish)
PRRT&HS 8188
Purcellville, VA


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Carbon Black Car?

Tim O'Connor
 


Does UTLX 96720 look like an ACF built tank car? Is it the same as the Kadee model?

Tim O'Connor


On 7/8/2020 1:50 PM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:

Bob and all;

 

I see two Skelgas and at least three other (one being a UTLX), what look like ICC-105-300’s, almost certainly in compressed gas service.  Is there a production area in the vicinity?

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 8, 2020 12:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Carbon Black Car?

 

Photo: Carbon Black Car?

A 1955 photo from the Oklahoma Historical Society:

Blockedhttps://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc193102/?q=train

Click on the photo to enlarge it and use the Zoom button to enlarge it further.

The covered hopper appears to be a carbon black car.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Looking for tips on transferring Clover House dry transfers to decal paper

Tim O'Connor
 

Steve

I use a plastic cutting mat on my table tops. These come in many sizes and are really handy for all modeling uses.
Here is an example - https://www.connectingthreads.com/omnigrid-mat/p/81690

Tim O'


On 7/9/2020 12:02 AM, Steve and Barb Hile wrote:

Thanks to Tim, Doug, Claus, Lester and John for the good advice.  I was working on a softer pine desk top and tried a variety of burnishing devices, with fairly poor results.  I moved to a much harder desktop surface and tried the butt end of a wooden paint brush and my finger nail with decent results, taping down one side to allow me to see what was attaching to the paper and what was not.

 

A few more sets are on order, along with some other burnishing tools and the MS liquid decal film.  I tried Future on an early test, with middling results.  The challenge is doing a multi-color decal in layers of transfers.

 

Thanks again!

Steve Hile


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tim O'Connor
 

Dave, it does not require "free running".

It could have been loaded by ANY railroad in the AAR region (or regions) served by the BAR and
sent to the AAR region that included Florida or to any adjacent region. From there it could end up going
back -towards- a BAR region or to any region ADJACENT to a BAR region, or... not. It could be
reloaded there, and sent anywhere at all. As long as the per diem was paid, the BAR had no grounds to
complain.

People who think freight cars (esp box cars) moved like ping-pong balls back and forth are MISTAKEN.

Tim O'Connor


On 7/9/2020 2:01 AM, Dave Parker via groups.io wrote:
On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 09:26 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
One more time, guys. Box cars were free runners. They could have arrived in Seattle after being loaded ANYWHERE. Get over the idea that they had to be loaded on their home road.
One more time guys.  Prior to about 1942, there wasn't any such thing as a "free runner"
 
The photo that started this thread is of a B&M series 12100-12299 auto (not box) car built in 1910.  Although the photo quality is poor, it doesn't look like it dates to much more than a decade later.  In that context, I think the chances that it ended up in Florida as some sort of random routing event are zilch. 

I have not seen any Seattle photos, but the obvious examples of B&M cars in LA are in Speedwitch FOFC, vols 2 and 9.  Two cars total, both in 1936-37.  I would make the same case here:  it is very unlikely that they wandered down the coast having been loaded in Seattle.  That's much more of a 1945+ scenario.

Last, the important New England commodity that hasn't yet been mentioned is shoes, at least prior to WWII.  Hides came east, shoes went west.  IIRC, Woburn (MA) was the biggest center, which is why it's a SuperFund site today (chromium-6 problems).

--
Dave Parker

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Rails and Hoists for Spools of Rayon

Bruce Smith
 

There was an American Viscose Rayon plant in Lewistown, PA, served directly by the PRR, that operated from 1921 until 1974. In the 1950's the captive service rayon cars for this plant consisted of 18 PRR X37B boxcars. It is my understanding that the rayon from this plant was primarily used in tire manufacturing.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL