Date   

Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Mont Switzer
 

Ben,

 

Why I like the Delrin 2-56 screws is I can cut or trim them to the exact length that I want, with ease.  I've done this before and after installation with equal success.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Benjamin Hom [b.hom@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 08, 2020 1:12 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

Wayne Cohen wrote:
"In the distant past, I tried Kadee’s 2-56 Delrin screws to mount couplers.  Many of the heads snapped off in normal use and I quit using them. Slot or Phillips head - same results."

Slot or Phillips is irrelevant - why use plastic screws if electrical shorts are not an issue?  Use metal screws instead.


Ben Hom


Re: An image of ACL ventilated boxcars

Tony Thompson
 

      Lovely model and beautiful paint scheme. But if the body color was called "yellow ocher," I would say the model is not that color. Alternatively, if the model is the right color, it should not be called "yellow ocher." I have no idea which one is right.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Tony Thompson
 

Don Valentine wrote:

Perhaps Tony Thompson, as our resident PFE man, has some insight on this.

  Looking at the photos I have from PFE shop work, I see no sign of any panels being assembled. Several photos clearly show individual boards (grooved to look like two boards) being installed.

Tony Thompson




Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob,
 
Very nicely done. I especially like the simulated wood grain on the tack boards.
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 09, 2020 7:34 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman




Re: An image of ACL ventilated boxcars

David Soderblom
 

That is an *exquisite* model and finishing job.  Extraordinary.



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA






Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

Brian Carlson
 

Bob since the D&M cars were postwar did they have the older  5/4 end or postwar IDE? 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 9, 2020, at 7:35 PM, Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:


When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman


 
<D&M Ptd RH.JPG>


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Rick Naylor
 

Diamond Match Company. Berst-Forster-Dixfield Division. Timber Unit.

The collection contains records of the Timber Unit of the Diamond Match Company's Berst-Forster-Dixfield Division. The Timber Unit, located in Oakland, Maine, was responsible for the purchase, transportation, and production of the lumber used to manufacture the company's products in Maine. It contracted with various lumber camps in the state for its supplies. The company had a long history in Oakland, beginning as the Forster Manufacturing Company in 1913. This company manufactured toothpicks and clothespins until 1916, when it was succeeded by the Berst-Forster-Dixfield Company, headquartered in New York City, which operated from 1923 to 1946. This company was succeeded by Diamond Match Company in 1947, which seems to have absorbed Berst-Forster sometime before that. Diamond Match had been formed in 1881 when twelve already-existing match companies agreed to consolidate into one. Diamond Match took over 85% of the market in the 1880's and in 1910 patented the first non-poisonous match in the United States. In 1957 it merged with Gardner Board and Carton Company to form Diamond-Gardner; in 1959 it merged with United States Printing and Lithograph Company to become Diamond National Corporation and then became Diamond International in 1964. It operated in several states and in addition to its mill in Oakland also had mills in Rumford, Phillips, and Dixfield, Maine. During its operation in Oakland, the plant made a number of products, including ice cream sticks, swab sticks, lollypop holders, toothpicks and woodenware. In its peak years just before World War II, the mill at Oakland employed over 500 people and its activities also gave work to loggers and others who provided raw materials to the mill. The operation in Oakland closed in 1983.




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of np328 <jcdworkingonthenp@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 2:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida
 
   Tim,   
The wooden match company in the Duluth area was Diamond Match company located in Cloquet, MN. The GN had a line from Duluth/Superior going west through there and the NP had a branch from Carlton, MN going to Cloquet. The Milwaukee had trackage rights over the Twin Cities / Twin Ports line with rights to Cloquet also. All three lines competed for this traffic as there were other decent sized mills in Cloquet making particleboard also.  Cloquet was the terminus for the Cloquet & North Eastern Rwy which was notable for running a number of steam locomotives well into the 1960s. And several Trains photo writeups about Where to still find steam. 

Sulphuric Acid on the spuds. Well that answers it.    McDonalds wanted clean white potatoes for their fries. Maine potatoes had been sent out prior as the standard. However they could not get the uniform whiteness that the commercial market or McD wanted for french fries - so that is when Idaho took over and Maine spuds became an also ran. I recall maybe thirty years ago after some late spring skiing at Sun Valley (girls skiing in bikinis, guys in shorts and T's) my brother and I had a relaxed schedule home and wondered about going south following the UP east to Fremont and heading up from there following the old Omaha line, which was literally on the shoulder of the road at times before it was rebuilt some years ago.  On going south through Idaho, our western friends said no, no, no, they are spraying the potato fields! They want people to stay out area for three days after spraying. That was enough to convince us.  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Jim Dick - Roseville, MN


Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

O Fenton Wells
 

Wowzer Bob, hand lettering, that's quite a feat.  Looks great.Very nicely done
Fenton

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 7:35 PM Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:
When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman


 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

Bob Chapman
 

When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman


 


Re: Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

Bill McClure
 

Generally, for certain publicity photos of the era the final heap was placed by hand. Every piece. There are C&O photos that show miners doing that.

Bill


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

John Holmes
 

Thanks much for enlightening me.

John Holmes

On Jul 9, 2020, at 1:54 PM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:



John;

 

I have seen a number of photos like this over the years, and others make it look like a publicity thing.  Like, “Look how perfect our coal you will get is.”

 

It is clear from some of those that the coal was sorted by size and appearance.

 

Some photos  have signs or banners, saying things like “Eastern Bituminous Burns Best”.  Good cheap advertising for somebody!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Holmes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 4:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

 

Ok folks, I am not a coal road modeler, but my curiosity is too much.  This coal load needs an explanation from those in the know.  The lumps are placed so well...better than some patios that I have seen.  

 

John Holmes



On Jul 9, 2020, at 9:55 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:



Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

An undated photo from West Virginia University:

Blockedhttps://wvhistoryonview.org/image/003502.jpg

1930 or later,

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Carbon Black drawings?

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Don, 
  Thanks for that info!  I wasn't sure if a kit existed for a carbon black car, but the friend who is building his from scratch is in S scale. I've previously purchased HO kits to duplicate in S, one of which is the F&C LV Wrong Way door box.
     Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Carbon Black drawings?

Bruce Smith
 

Don,

There are multiple models of AC&F carbon black hoppers in HO, including the very dated NEBW resin (F&C), the updated F&C kit, the injection molded Rail Shop Inc. styrene kit, and the Overland brass model. These are discussed extensively in our archives.

However, the question was asked because the list member wants an S Scale car, so none of these help.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...>
Sent: Sunday, July 5, 2020 7:01 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Carbon Black drawings?
 

Hi Bud,

 

     You are aware, I presume, that someone offered a resin kit for the Cabot Corp. carbon black

cars. If memory serves I believe it was Steve Funaro of F&C.

 

My best, Don Valentine

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: An image of ACL ventilated boxcars

palmettoltd82
 

The original ACL Atlantic Coast Despatch paint scheme (yellow ochre body, boxcar red & white herald, black lettering, boxcar red trim) was officially dropped in 1929 in favor of the more cost effective brown with white lettering.  The attached photo of Rich Yoders O-scale O-17 model shows the pre-1929 paint scheme.   The pre-29 paint scheme was also applied to ACL subsidiary roads such as the Washington & Vandermere (with ACD herald) and the Winston-Salem Southbound Rwy (sans ACD herald).  The ACL also modified 50 class O-12 vents for express service. The cars (Nos. 1800-1849) were painted Pullman dark green and lettered in white.  The 0-12s were returned to the freight service with the conversion of the 50 USRA DS rebuilds (1850-1899).  Hope this helps.


Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Bruce Smith
 

Dennis, Don,

I had an alternative explanation that is purely speculative, as yours are. Perhaps these boards have been removed by workers as part of the salvage operation. That could either be to assess the condition of the insulation, or to open up the sides to allow it to dry, without too severely damaging the integrity of the sides. Uniform locations would explain the regularity 😉

I believe that boards are missing in what appears to be multiples of 2 because of the use of V center V siding that has the appearance of 2 boards for every actual board.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 4:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers
 
On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 12:36 PM, Donald B. Valentine wrote:

If you look at both photos the cars all show a 4 and 4 panel pattern on either

side of the doors in the same places n the car sides even if the number of individual boards lost varies.

This leads me to wonder just how these cars were originally constructed or “assembled”. Could it be

that panels of siding were assembled as units before actually being applied to the sides of the cars?

I noticed that too, Don, the missing siding seems to be at the car post locations. Since the siding is a single layer of T&G, I don't see any way to blame it on panels. Here is what I think happened. The siding is nailed to girths; horizontal wood rails that are fitted between the posts. That means it's likely a lot of nails in those strips of siding adjacent to the posts only caught the end of the girth, so those boards were not attached quite as solidly as the strips further from the posts. When subjected to the scouring action of the flood waters, those were the first boards to let go. It's also possible that the proximity of the post put more pressure on those siding boards as the current tried to force it's way between. Whatever the reason it is clearly related to the position of the car posts, and it was consistent along the length of both cars.

Dennis Storzek


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Mystery Cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Most certainly coke extensions.  The gaps are for wheelbarrows on ramps.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of O Fenton Wells
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 1:32 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Mystery Cars

 

Probably for hauling coke

Fenton

 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 12:57 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Mystery Cars

An undated photo from West Virginia University:

Blockedhttps://wvhistoryonview.org/image/025947.jpg

These cars appear to be gondolas with extensions. Anyone have an idea what these cars were used for?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


 

--

Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Businesses served by the PRR's Mon Division/Branch over time

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Yes, Tom, and research into the individual industries/customers.

 

I have a larger document that covers what I know on each customer/siding/interchange, researched to-date (this is a whole lot of work), and what that contributed as carloads, and of what.

 

I am also interested in the evolution of that area over time, which changed tremendously.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of tmkprr1954 via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 1:44 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Businesses served by the PRR's Mon Division/Branch over time

 

Elden,

That is indeed an interesting evolution of customers.  Did that come from CT1000s?

 

Regards,

 

Tom Kane

Modeling the PRR in 1954 (ish)

PRRT&HS 8188

Purcelleville, VA


Re: Businesses served by the PRR's Mon Division/Branch over time

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

No, NAPTOWN (name?), those are the number of businesses of that type served, like 12 breweries/distilleries becomes 5, then still 5, then 1.  Not only due to prohibition, but also consolidation, and example being “Pittsburgh Brewing”, who consolidated lots of smaller operations into their own, with fewer customers then served.

 

The carloads on the Mon were immense.

 

That’s a whole ‘nother subject!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of naptownprr
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 2:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Businesses served by the PRR's Mon Division/Branch over time

 

What do the numbers represent in the columns?  Surely they are not carloads.


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 12:55 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io; PRR@PRR.groups.io
Subject: [External] [RealSTMFC] Businesses served by the PRR's Mon Division/Branch over time

 

This message was sent from a non-IU address. Please exercise caution when clicking links or opening attachments from external sources.

 

Groups;

 

To add to the discussion on industries served, over time, I thought you might find this interesting:

 

PRR’s Monongahela Division/Branch:   1918, 1939, 1945, 1962:

Business Traffic by Commodity/Industry – 1918 to 1962

Commodity/

Industry

1918

1939

1945

1962

Auto/Truck Delivery

1

 

 

 

Boiler Tubes

1

 

 

 

Boxes

 

2

2

2

Brewing/Distilling

12

5

5

1

Brick (Standard, not refractories)

2

1

1

 

Cement

 

1

1

1

Chemical/Coke By-Products

1

3

4

4

Coal (Mining)

48

32

39

16

Coal (Retail)

1

2

2

 

Coke

 

4

1

1

 

Coal AND Coke

 

7

1

 

 

Concrete Block

 

 

 

1

Construction

 

 

2

 

Cooperage (Barrels)

1

1

1

 

Dairy

 

1

1

1

Drain Pipe

 

1

1

1

Drywall

 

1

1

1

Electrical Products

 

 

 

1

Feed and/or Milling

 

1

1

1

Flour

 

1

1

1

Foundry Products/”Iron Works”/Castings

3

1

1

 

Finished Furniture Storage & Transfer

 

1

1

 

Glass & Glasshouse Supply

 

11

5

5

2

Grain

2

 

 

 

Grocery/Supermarket Supply

1

1

1

1

Hangers

 

1

1

1

Hay

1

 

 

 

Ice

3

1

1

 

Iron Only (Muck Iron)

1

1

1

1

Iron & Steel Pipe (Primarily iron)

2

1

1

1

LCL/Station Deliveries

35

34

37

14

Lumber/Commercial Products/Building Supply

21

17

20

13

Machinery

5

4

4

3

Marine Ways

 

1

1

1

Meat

3

4

4

1

Mercantile

 

 

1

 

Mine & Mill Supply

 

1

1

1

1

Munitions Casings

 

 

1

1

Natural Gas

2

1

1

1

Oil or Refined Products

6

8

13

8

Paper (Wrapping)

1

 

 

 

Plumbing Supply

 

1

1

2

Power Generation

1

2

4

3

Produce

2

2

2

1

Railroad Track Parts

1

1

1

1

Railroad Wheels

1

1

1

?

Refractories

1

1

1

1

Sand & Gravel

2

1

1

 

Sashes & Doors

 

1

1

1

Scrap/Iron & Metal

2

2

5

5

Slag

 

 

1

 

Specialty Moving Services

 

 

1

 

Steel/Iron & Steel (primarily steel)

9

15

15

13

Steel Supply for Fabricators

1

1

1

1

Storage/Transfer/Warehousing

1

3

4

3

Team Track

1

1

1

1

Toy Pistols

1

 

 

 

Trunks & Bags

 

1

1

1

***Unknown***

 

8

15

6?

U.S. Army Engineers

 

1

1

 

Water (Water Treatment)

1

2

3

3

TOTAL BUSINESSES

 

200

180

218

122?

TOTAL CARLOADS IN / OUT

 

12,481/21,759

 

 

 

Percent Coal Mining (Out)

24%

18%

18%

13%

Carloads of Coal/Percentage of Total

 

 

 

 

Percent Station Delivery (In/Out)

18

19

17

11

 

 

 

 

 

Percent Steel Industry (In/Out)

5

8

7

11

 

 

 

 

 

Percent Lumber/Building Supply (In)

11

9

9

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note big declines in brewing, coal mining, coke, glass, LCL, and growth in steel and scrap.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

 


Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 12:36 PM, Donald B. Valentine wrote:

If you look at both photos the cars all show a 4 and 4 panel pattern on either

side of the doors in the same places n the car sides even if the number of individual boards lost varies.

This leads me to wonder just how these cars were originally constructed or “assembled”. Could it be

that panels of siding were assembled as units before actually being applied to the sides of the cars?

I noticed that too, Don, the missing siding seems to be at the car post locations. Since the siding is a single layer of T&G, I don't see any way to blame it on panels. Here is what I think happened. The siding is nailed to girths; horizontal wood rails that are fitted between the posts. That means it's likely a lot of nails in those strips of siding adjacent to the posts only caught the end of the girth, so those boards were not attached quite as solidly as the strips further from the posts. When subjected to the scouring action of the flood waters, those were the first boards to let go. It's also possible that the proximity of the post put more pressure on those siding boards as the current tried to force it's way between. Whatever the reason it is clearly related to the position of the car posts, and it was consistent along the length of both cars.

Dennis Storzek


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

John;

 

I have seen a number of photos like this over the years, and others make it look like a publicity thing.  Like, “Look how perfect our coal you will get is.”

 

It is clear from some of those that the coal was sorted by size and appearance.

 

Some photos  have signs or banners, saying things like “Eastern Bituminous Burns Best”.  Good cheap advertising for somebody!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Holmes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 4:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

 

Ok folks, I am not a coal road modeler, but my curiosity is too much.  This coal load needs an explanation from those in the know.  The lumps are placed so well...better than some patios that I have seen.  

 

John Holmes



On Jul 9, 2020, at 9:55 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:



Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

An undated photo from West Virginia University:

Blockedhttps://wvhistoryonview.org/image/003502.jpg

1930 or later,

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

6701 - 6720 of 182152