Date   

Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

James Brewer
 

Bob,

Another great build!  I believe Ted Culotta did offer decals for this group of cars as a "special" set sometime in the past.

Keep building!

Jim Brewer


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Mont Switzer
 

Tony,

 

That is how you cut longer bolts and treaded rod in the real world.  Always works.

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 12:05 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

 

Mont Switzer wrote:



Why I like the Delrin 2-56 screws is I can cut or trim them to the exact length that I want, with ease.  I've done this before and after installation with equal success.

 

      Works equally well with brass screws, Mont. Just turn a nut onto the screw above the cut, make the cut, then turn the nut back off, cleans up the thread, then file if needed. Almost as quick as with plastic.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Mont Switzer
 

Cranberries:  the folks around Warren, Wisconsin, Cranberry Museum say their state is the largest cranberry producing state in the US.

 

Idaho:  I thought they were growing french fries there.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Walter Cox via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 12:46 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

 

Were Dexter shoes sold that far west? When they were actually made in Maine they were all I bought.

Walt

In a message dated 7/8/2020 9:07:05 PM Eastern Standard Time, drpaasch@... writes:

 

They wouldn't ship spuds or cranberries from Maine to the west coast as Washington and Idaho are spud country, and Washington and Oregon grow cranberries (Ocean Spray).  But B&M beans are THE best and certainly were shipped to the west!

Paper not likely as Washington had gobs of paper mills.  But I have been looking at how to justify a BAR reefer and some BM cars to appear on my Seattle layout and any more ideas would be welcome.  All I can think of for a BAR reefer is fresh lobster?  I like the idea of the BM car carrying B&M beans to some grocery distributors, too.

  Doug Paasch

 


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Parker wrote:

One more time guys.  Prior to about 1942, there wasn't any such thing as a "free runner"

     I'm not sure what Dave based this statement on, and have looked into the history of freight car handling to see if I could see what he meant.
      I already replied that essentially the same Car Service Rules in place through the 1950s had been adopted by the AAR in 1934. But that only reflects some minor modifications at that time in the existing rules.
       I went back to E.W. Coughlin's book, _Freight Car Distribution and Car Handling in the United States_ of 1956, published by the AAR's Car Service Division, for which Coughlin worked. In discussing the Car Service Rules, he observed that freight car handling between railroads was governed by essentially the same principles and "the same Code of Car Service Rules as adopted in the closing years of the last century" [19th century].
        So effectively the first sixty years of the 20th century were governed by those rules, and though they continued in force thereafter, the widening use of Special Car Order 90 directions for direct return homeward of a growing variety of cars certainly began to erode the previous patterns of car movement.

Tony Thompson




Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Walter Cox
 


There were also differences in the dates that the crop matured in the various growing areas.

 

Re: Potatoes

Were the same varieties of potatoes grown in Idaho & Maine?  I’ve no idea what kinds were grown in Maine.  My image of an Idaho potato is just the Russets, but that may be more out of ignorance (maybe I should look at the bags, next time I’m in the store ;-) than any actual knowledge of what varieties are/were grown in Idaho.

_._,_._,_


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Walter Cox
 

Were Dexter shoes sold that far west? When they were actually made in Maine they were all I bought.
Walt

In a message dated 7/8/2020 9:07:05 PM Eastern Standard Time, drpaasch@... writes:

They wouldn't ship spuds or cranberries from Maine to the west coast as Washington and Idaho are spud country, and Washington and Oregon grow cranberries (Ocean Spray).  But B&M beans are THE best and certainly were shipped to the west!

Paper not likely as Washington had gobs of paper mills.  But I have been looking at how to justify a BAR reefer and some BM cars to appear on my Seattle layout and any more ideas would be welcome.  All I can think of for a BAR reefer is fresh lobster?  I like the idea of the BM car carrying B&M beans to some grocery distributors, too.

  Doug Paasch


_._,_._,_


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Tony Thompson
 

Mont Switzer wrote:

Why I like the Delrin 2-56 screws is I can cut or trim them to the exact length that I want, with ease.  I've done this before and after installation with equal success.

      Works equally well with brass screws, Mont. Just turn a nut onto the screw above the cut, make the cut, then turn the nut back off, cleans up the thread, then file if needed. Almost as quick as with plastic.

Tony Thompson




Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Douglas Harding
 

I have an electrician’s wire stripper that also is designed to cut a variety of small screw sizes, including 2-56. Works great on brass screws, gives a nice clean cut, just touch up with a file and I have one any length I want.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 9:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

 

Ben,

 

Why I like the Delrin 2-56 screws is I can cut or trim them to the exact length that I want, with ease.  I've done this before and after installation with equal success.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Benjamin Hom [b.hom@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 08, 2020 1:12 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

Wayne Cohen wrote:
"In the distant past, I tried Kadee’s 2-56 Delrin screws to mount couplers.  Many of the heads snapped off in normal use and I quit using them. Slot or Phillips head - same results."

 

Slot or Phillips is irrelevant - why use plastic screws if electrical shorts are not an issue?  Use metal screws instead.

 

 

Ben Hom


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Mont Switzer
 

Ben,

 

Why I like the Delrin 2-56 screws is I can cut or trim them to the exact length that I want, with ease.  I've done this before and after installation with equal success.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Benjamin Hom [b.hom@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 08, 2020 1:12 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

Wayne Cohen wrote:
"In the distant past, I tried Kadee’s 2-56 Delrin screws to mount couplers.  Many of the heads snapped off in normal use and I quit using them. Slot or Phillips head - same results."

Slot or Phillips is irrelevant - why use plastic screws if electrical shorts are not an issue?  Use metal screws instead.


Ben Hom


Re: An image of ACL ventilated boxcars

Tony Thompson
 

      Lovely model and beautiful paint scheme. But if the body color was called "yellow ocher," I would say the model is not that color. Alternatively, if the model is the right color, it should not be called "yellow ocher." I have no idea which one is right.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Tony Thompson
 

Don Valentine wrote:

Perhaps Tony Thompson, as our resident PFE man, has some insight on this.

  Looking at the photos I have from PFE shop work, I see no sign of any panels being assembled. Several photos clearly show individual boards (grooved to look like two boards) being installed.

Tony Thompson




Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi Bob,
 
Very nicely done. I especially like the simulated wood grain on the tack boards.
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 09, 2020 7:34 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman




Re: An image of ACL ventilated boxcars

David Soderblom
 

That is an *exquisite* model and finishing job.  Extraordinary.



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA






Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

Brian Carlson
 

Bob since the D&M cars were postwar did they have the older  5/4 end or postwar IDE? 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 9, 2020, at 7:35 PM, Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:


When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman


 
<D&M Ptd RH.JPG>


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Rick Naylor
 

Diamond Match Company. Berst-Forster-Dixfield Division. Timber Unit.

The collection contains records of the Timber Unit of the Diamond Match Company's Berst-Forster-Dixfield Division. The Timber Unit, located in Oakland, Maine, was responsible for the purchase, transportation, and production of the lumber used to manufacture the company's products in Maine. It contracted with various lumber camps in the state for its supplies. The company had a long history in Oakland, beginning as the Forster Manufacturing Company in 1913. This company manufactured toothpicks and clothespins until 1916, when it was succeeded by the Berst-Forster-Dixfield Company, headquartered in New York City, which operated from 1923 to 1946. This company was succeeded by Diamond Match Company in 1947, which seems to have absorbed Berst-Forster sometime before that. Diamond Match had been formed in 1881 when twelve already-existing match companies agreed to consolidate into one. Diamond Match took over 85% of the market in the 1880's and in 1910 patented the first non-poisonous match in the United States. In 1957 it merged with Gardner Board and Carton Company to form Diamond-Gardner; in 1959 it merged with United States Printing and Lithograph Company to become Diamond National Corporation and then became Diamond International in 1964. It operated in several states and in addition to its mill in Oakland also had mills in Rumford, Phillips, and Dixfield, Maine. During its operation in Oakland, the plant made a number of products, including ice cream sticks, swab sticks, lollypop holders, toothpicks and woodenware. In its peak years just before World War II, the mill at Oakland employed over 500 people and its activities also gave work to loggers and others who provided raw materials to the mill. The operation in Oakland closed in 1983.




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of np328 <jcdworkingonthenp@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 2:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida
 
   Tim,   
The wooden match company in the Duluth area was Diamond Match company located in Cloquet, MN. The GN had a line from Duluth/Superior going west through there and the NP had a branch from Carlton, MN going to Cloquet. The Milwaukee had trackage rights over the Twin Cities / Twin Ports line with rights to Cloquet also. All three lines competed for this traffic as there were other decent sized mills in Cloquet making particleboard also.  Cloquet was the terminus for the Cloquet & North Eastern Rwy which was notable for running a number of steam locomotives well into the 1960s. And several Trains photo writeups about Where to still find steam. 

Sulphuric Acid on the spuds. Well that answers it.    McDonalds wanted clean white potatoes for their fries. Maine potatoes had been sent out prior as the standard. However they could not get the uniform whiteness that the commercial market or McD wanted for french fries - so that is when Idaho took over and Maine spuds became an also ran. I recall maybe thirty years ago after some late spring skiing at Sun Valley (girls skiing in bikinis, guys in shorts and T's) my brother and I had a relaxed schedule home and wondered about going south following the UP east to Fremont and heading up from there following the old Omaha line, which was literally on the shoulder of the road at times before it was rebuilt some years ago.  On going south through Idaho, our western friends said no, no, no, they are spraying the potato fields! They want people to stay out area for three days after spraying. That was enough to convince us.  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Jim Dick - Roseville, MN


Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

O Fenton Wells
 

Wowzer Bob, hand lettering, that's quite a feat.  Looks great.Very nicely done
Fenton

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 7:35 PM Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:
When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman


 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

Bob Chapman
 

When I lived in Central Michigan, the Detroit & Mackinac was our neighborhood railroad, a short line serving the northeast coast of Michigan from Bay City to Mackinaw City, where it connected with a steam-powered car ferry crossing the Straits of Mackinac. In 1947, D&M bought 200 1937 AAR-design boxcars in the #2800-2999 series. With most postwar boxcars at 10’6” interior height, D&M’s 1947 purchase of the obsolescent 10’0” IH cars was curious.

Recent completion of six C&BT kits from the deep stash unearthed a pair of circa-1990 undec IMWX “W-corner” 1937 AAR kits -- one a perfect match for the D&M prototype.

The separate details provided with the kit were much better executed than those of the C&BT kits, and fewer replacement parts were needed – namely Barber S-2 trucks, and Kadee grabs and Universal brakewheel. I used the kit’s wooden running board, although Yarmouth's US Gypsum type would have been more correct.

I opted for D&M’s circa-1950 lettering scheme, not available as a decal set. The roadname and reporting marks are 8” letters from a Microscale alphabet, with dimensional data from K4’s D&M set. Weathering represents the tired paint and lettering befitting a short line boxcar.

While not a lot of modeling here, I thought the lettering scheme might be of interest -- to my knowledge not offered on a commercial model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman


 


Re: Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

Bill McClure
 

Generally, for certain publicity photos of the era the final heap was placed by hand. Every piece. There are C&O photos that show miners doing that.

Bill


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

John Holmes
 

Thanks much for enlightening me.

John Holmes

On Jul 9, 2020, at 1:54 PM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:



John;

 

I have seen a number of photos like this over the years, and others make it look like a publicity thing.  Like, “Look how perfect our coal you will get is.”

 

It is clear from some of those that the coal was sorted by size and appearance.

 

Some photos  have signs or banners, saying things like “Eastern Bituminous Burns Best”.  Good cheap advertising for somebody!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Holmes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 4:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

 

Ok folks, I am not a coal road modeler, but my curiosity is too much.  This coal load needs an explanation from those in the know.  The lumps are placed so well...better than some patios that I have seen.  

 

John Holmes



On Jul 9, 2020, at 9:55 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:



Photo: C&O Hopper 56516 With Lump Coal Load

An undated photo from West Virginia University:

Blockedhttps://wvhistoryonview.org/image/003502.jpg

1930 or later,

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Carbon Black drawings?

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Don, 
  Thanks for that info!  I wasn't sure if a kit existed for a carbon black car, but the friend who is building his from scratch is in S scale. I've previously purchased HO kits to duplicate in S, one of which is the F&C LV Wrong Way door box.
     Bud Rindfleisch

18161 - 18180 of 193620