Date   

Re: B&O double sheathed boxcar with single sheathed ends?

Dave Parker
 

I don't know how unusual this combination is generally, but it (or something similar) is not uncommon on rebuilt 36-ft DS cars (D&H, NYNH&H, probably others).  But, this is a 40-ft car (says my 1938 ORER), so maybe it is.  Perhaps one of the B&O experts can comment.

I do, however, find the roof unusual.  Why to the seam caps seem to stop a good foot short of the eave?  Have we ever seen this before?
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photos: MPLX Tank Car 966 - Mexican Petroleum Corporation

John Stanford
 

Does anyone know the timeline for the later MPLX lettering schemes?  Did the American Gas lettering on silver preceed the white Amoco logo on black, or were they concurrent?  Wondering what would be appropriate for late 40's.

-John Stanford


B&O double sheathed boxcar with single sheathed ends?

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

A Facebook poster pointed out that B&O boxcar #82965, just to the right of center and just beyond the two tank cars in this John Vachon, June 1941 photo of Milwaukee's yards
shows a single sheathed end on a double sheathed car. (I suggest going to the .tif image at https://cdn.loc.gov/master/pnp/fsa/8c19000/8c19600/8c19665u.tif to really blow it up).

Other photos in the series are interesting as well, including this nearly top-down gondola load

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Actually, binder head screws are used in conjunction with binder posts, a T-shaped internally-threaded post which fits in standard punched holes in paper.  The posts and the screws are used to >>bind<< booklets and to get to topic, freight car diagram books.  Having caused the ELHS to republish freight, passenger and locomotive diagram books, I am quite familiar with them.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 4:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

 

What you illustrate is called a “binder-head” screw. They have the thinnest head among the common screw types. Due to the shallow head few have Phillips or cross-head driving recesses. They were developed to hold wires to terminals, called “binding”. They are commonly found in the electronics industry, especially on barrier-type terminal strips.

 

Slightly thicker and more rounded are “pan-head” screws. The thicker head allows, in addition the common slot, use of Phillips or cross-head driving recesses.

 

Next up in head thickness is the common “round-head” screw where the head is nearly hemispherical.

 

There are many other types. The more common include:

 

“stove-head” screws (sometimes called" truss-head”) that have a larger diameter thin head. The name comes from their original use in assembling sheet metal heating and cooking stoves.

 

“fillister-head” screws (sometimes called “cheese-head”) have a thick cylindrical head, usually with a slightly convex top surface. These are found mostly in machine assembly. Some of the Kadee plastic screws have this head.



Most of the thicker head styles are also available with “Allen” (hex socket) driving recesses, and nowadays “”Torx” or similar star-shaped recesses.



Complicating the issue is that every make uses slightly different shape and proportions, plus many commercial large-scale users specify their own designs.



Dan Mitchell

==========

 



On Jul 10, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

 

I keep running into a difficulty of the draft gear box wanting to rotate if the screw isn’t really TIGHT, which can be obviated by making sure there is a continuous contact between the back end of the box and the center sill, or, of course, by some adhesive.  I really prefer the very flat headed screws I mentioned before as it reduces the side profile of the screw head.  They look something like this:

<image003.jpg>

But have an even flatter head

When I got the dozens I have, they were only available with the slotted head.  I see now that there are some which are cross-headed screws.

 

Schuyler

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 10:13 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

 

Hi List Members,

 

It is exactly for this reason that I prefer brass screws - they are relatively easy to cut to a custom length (much easier than steel screws), but since they are metal they are stronger than plastic screws

 

Claus Schlunnd

 

----- Original Message ----- 

Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 8:31 AM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

 


I use the Kadee screws for cases (hoppers and flats) where the length of the screw causes it to emerge
and become visible - or if it interferes with something inside the car, like a weight. I install it, and then cut it
off flush. If you're snapping them, you're over tightening them. Use a tiny drop of Loctite if you're worried
about them coming out.

Tim O'Connor


On 7/8/2020 1:12 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Wayne Cohen wrote: 
"In the distant past, I tried Kadee’s 2-56 Delrin screws to mount couplers.  Many of the heads snapped off in normal use and I quit using them. Slot or Phillips head - same results."

 

Slot or Phillips is irrelevant - why use plastic screws if electrical shorts are not an issue?  Use metal screws instead.

 

 

Ben Hom


-- 
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

 


Re: Poultry cars : Bachmann news just received

Tim O'Connor
 


No one is going to import a "Tangent quality" RTR poultry car from China (or wherever).

Ambroid wood kit, Overland brass, or scratchbuild. Them's the choices in HO scale.


On 7/10/2020 12:00 PM, Eric Hansmann wrote:

Charlie Vlk posted this reply to the Early Rail discussion list on this Bachmann model.

 

As I said, the car body is the standard Bachmann 40 Ft steel box car.  I wouldn’t be surprised if it is the same mold or started life as the Athearn copy that Kader made for Mantua as their “Crown” line in the 1960s that were sold as carded RTR cars.

The printing almost makes a convincing car though….in the catalog.

Charlie Vlk

 

IMO, this model might prevent another manufacture from producing a model with prototype fidelity. Other than the screening, there is little about the Bachmann model that reflects the prototype poultry cars.

 

Oh, it has wheels. I forgot the prototype poultry cars ran on wheels.

 

Eric Hansmann



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Tim O'Connor
 


Yep, definitely below the stringer, and attached (abutted) to the end sill.



On 7/10/2020 2:56 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 08:07 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Well, I agree that it’s not tight to the floor above it, but . . . it’s also appearing to be bent, and on a wrecked car, I’d be cautious about generalizing from the condition of this particular diagonal to say that all diagonals on PFE reefers are the same.  Once bent, that channel has lost a good bit of its integrity.
All the way at the left edge of the second photo https://dl.library.ucla.edu/islandora/object/edu.ucla.library.specialCollections.losAngelesDailyNews%3A1053
is another car that shows both diagonals and neither is bent. I'd say the cars were built this way. the 1910 era NYC 36' steel underframe boxcar I tooled a couple years ago also had the diagonals below the floor stringers; they are on the Pullman builder's drawings. Those diagonals run the more conventional way, from the center of the bolster out to the car corners, likely to reinforce the frame behind the poling pocket. I'd say the purpose of running the diagonal in the opposit direction is to keep the body bolster from bending when the roping staple was used to move too many coupled cars. 

Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

John Monrad
 


Dimensions per McMaster-Carr for 2-56 screw heads, 18-8 ss:

Type    Diameter (in)   Height (in)   /100 (1/4in)
Truss       0.194              0.053             $4.96
Binding*  0.181              0.050             $4.69
Pan          0.167              0.063             $4.49

*Slotted only

John Monrad


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Matt Goodman
 

Interesting. I’ve seen 4-40 shears on wire strippers, but not 2-56. The former works, but requires cleanup. Ironically, my full size strippers will cut down to the 4-40, whereas the smaller strippers that will do 30 gauge wire only goes down to 6’s.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On Jul 9, 2020, at 10:57 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

I have an electrician’s wire stripper that also is designed to cut a variety of small screw sizes, including 2-56. Works great on brass screws, gives a nice clean cut, just touch up with a file and I have one any length I want.
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 9:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws
 

Ben,

 

Why I like the Delrin 2-56 screws is I can cut or trim them to the exact length that I want, with ease.  I've done this before and after installation with equal success.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Benjamin Hom [b.hom@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 08, 2020 1:12 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

Wayne Cohen wrote: 
"In the distant past, I tried Kadee’s 2-56 Delrin screws to mount couplers.  Many of the heads snapped off in normal use and I quit using them. Slot or Phillips head - same results."
 
Slot or Phillips is irrelevant - why use plastic screws if electrical shorts are not an issue?  Use metal screws instead.
 
 

Ben Hom



Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

What you illustrate is called a “binder-head” screw. They have the thinnest head among the common screw types. Due to the shallow head few have Phillips or cross-head driving recesses. They were developed to hold wires to terminals, called “binding”. They are commonly found in the electronics industry, especially on barrier-type terminal strips.

Slightly thicker and more rounded are “pan-head” screws. The thicker head allows, in addition the common slot, use of Phillips or cross-head driving recesses.

Next up in head thickness is the common “round-head” screw where the head is nearly hemispherical.

There are many other types. The more common include:

“stove-head” screws (sometimes called" truss-head”) that have a larger diameter thin head. The name comes from their original use in assembling sheet metal heating and cooking stoves.

“fillister-head” screws (sometimes called “cheese-head”) have a thick cylindrical head, usually with a slightly convex top surface. These are found mostly in machine assembly. Some of the Kadee plastic screws have this head.

Most of the thicker head styles are also available with “Allen” (hex socket) driving recesses, and nowadays “”Torx” or similar star-shaped recesses.

Complicating the issue is that every make uses slightly different shape and proportions, plus many commercial large-scale users specify their own designs.

Dan Mitchell
==========


On Jul 10, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

I keep running into a difficulty of the draft gear box wanting to rotate if the screw isn’t really TIGHT, which can be obviated by making sure there is a continuous contact between the back end of the box and the center sill, or, of course, by some adhesive.  I really prefer the very flat headed screws I mentioned before as it reduces the side profile of the screw head.  They look something like this:
<image003.jpg>
But have an even flatter head
When I got the dozens I have, they were only available with the slotted head.  I see now that there are some which are cross-headed screws.
 
Schuyler
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 10:13 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws
 
Hi List Members,
 
It is exactly for this reason that I prefer brass screws - they are relatively easy to cut to a custom length (much easier than steel screws), but since they are metal they are stronger than plastic screws
 
Claus Schlunnd
 
----- Original Message ----- 
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws
 

I use the Kadee screws for cases (hoppers and flats) where the length of the screw causes it to emerge
and become visible - or if it interferes with something inside the car, like a weight. I install it, and then cut it
off flush. If you're snapping them, you're over tightening them. Use a tiny drop of Loctite if you're worried
about them coming out.

Tim O'Connor


On 7/8/2020 1:12 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Wayne Cohen wrote: 
"In the distant past, I tried Kadee’s 2-56 Delrin screws to mount couplers.  Many of the heads snapped off in normal use and I quit using them. Slot or Phillips head - same results."
 
Slot or Phillips is irrelevant - why use plastic screws if electrical shorts are not an issue?  Use metal screws instead.
 
 
Ben Hom

-- 
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts



Re: About match-making (so to speak)

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

David and Tim,

The destruction of the inland redwoods was particularly brutal. Unlike the more sturdy coastal redwoods, the inland trees had very brittle wood. When the tree was felled, often a lot was so damaged it couldn't be worked into dimensional lumber. I suppose toothpicks were one way to salvage what they could from these noble trees. Much wood was just left behind on the forest floor. Since a great deal of the inland redwood forests were virtually stolen from the U.S. Government through false homesteading claims filed by "straw men" and cost the lumber companies almost nothing, the loggers just moved on to the next tree.

Yes, some of this timber was moved to mills on freight cars (mandatory content).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 10:56 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

It's too horrible to contemplate how much fabulous old growth timber was wantonly destroyed. Ugh.

Think of all the old retired freight cars that were simply BURNED in the open to recover the steel.
Millions of freight cars! Compare to the recovery of salt-infused timber from the SP's Salt Lake trestle
that was sold for its beauty in the 1980's or 1990's.

When did paper matchbooks first appear by the way?

Tim O'

On 7/9/2020 1:40 PM, David Soderblom wrote:
About matches:  When Giant Sequoias were being logged ca. 1900 their enormous trunks were used for matches.

David Soderblom


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo Help -- DT&I Boxcar #14300-14549

hubert mask
 

Looks great.

Hubert Mask 


On Jul 10, 2020, at 12:50 PM, Craig Wilson <agecompanyphotog@...> wrote:

When I was building the Yarmouth kits for the earlier 14000-14299 series cars (which had the proprietary ACF ends and 7-foot doors) I also built one of the 8-foot door cars (14300-14599) cars using a Branchline kit as the starting point.  The sill tabs were removed and a solid bolster-to-bolster sill was fabricated from Evergreen styrene.  Also the gusset plates were added next to the door.

The photo Tim posted clearly shows the extra vertical row of rivets in the side panels.  I used Archer Transfers rivets for these.  A photo of the completed model is attached.  I used a Yarmouth etched running board and Tahoe Barber S2 trucks.  I used the Mask Island decal set for the compass herald paint scheme with a repaint date of 1959 keeping it eligible for this list.

Craig Wilson


<XM40.DTI14309.JPG>


Re: NKP 50ft double door box cars some with Viking roofs questions

Brian Carlson
 

Yeah, someone reads the blogs I periodically write for the society.  

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 10, 2020, at 2:36 PM, Allan Smith <smithal9@...> wrote:


On Friday, July 10, 2020, 08:00:12 AM PDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Elden, some of the them were sold to the D&TS


On 7/10/2020 10:49 AM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:

Group;

 

I have searched in vain for my copy of the MM issue in which Bob Hundman outlined the NKP all-steel 50-foot double door box cars, in two series, one of which had Viking roofs.

 

Does anyone on the list know much about these cars?  Were they built for automobile or auto parts service?  I know NKP had plants on-line.

 

They look unique in several ways.  Did some have racks?  Were some or all originally “Damage Free” cars, or did that come later?

 

Do you know anything about the cars that went to P&WV?  They appear to have stenciling that would indicate as assignment.  Any idea to whom?  See attached.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Elden Gatwood



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts
<d&ts_5319 50ft_DD_box AAR-1940 exNKP_88000 series VIKING roof MORTON-rb.jpg>
<nkp_88120 50ft_DD_box AAR-1940 Pontiac automobile-bodies-load interior-view 1958.ebay.jpg>


Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 08:07 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Well, I agree that it’s not tight to the floor above it, but . . . it’s also appearing to be bent, and on a wrecked car, I’d be cautious about generalizing from the condition of this particular diagonal to say that all diagonals on PFE reefers are the same.  Once bent, that channel has lost a good bit of its integrity.
All the way at the left edge of the second photo https://dl.library.ucla.edu/islandora/object/edu.ucla.library.specialCollections.losAngelesDailyNews%3A1053
is another car that shows both diagonals and neither is bent. I'd say the cars were built this way. the 1910 era NYC 36' steel underframe boxcar I tooled a couple years ago also had the diagonals below the floor stringers; they are on the Pullman builder's drawings. Those diagonals run the more conventional way, from the center of the bolster out to the car corners, likely to reinforce the frame behind the poling pocket. I'd say the purpose of running the diagonal in the opposit direction is to keep the body bolster from bending when the roping staple was used to move too many coupled cars. 

Dennis Storzek


Re: AC&Y 1400-1466 series gondolas

Mac shp
 

Are there any reasonably accurate ho scale models of these gondolas?
Somewhere I read that Tichy made a gondola of this prototype but I think
the ACY Gon had more panels than the model but I am not sure. 
Can anyone confirm that the Tichy  model is correct?
Marc


Re: NKP 50ft double door box cars some with Viking roofs questions

Allan Smith
 

On Friday, July 10, 2020, 08:00:12 AM PDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Elden, some of the them were sold to the D&TS


On 7/10/2020 10:49 AM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:

Group;

 

I have searched in vain for my copy of the MM issue in which Bob Hundman outlined the NKP all-steel 50-foot double door box cars, in two series, one of which had Viking roofs.

 

Does anyone on the list know much about these cars?  Were they built for automobile or auto parts service?  I know NKP had plants on-line.

 

They look unique in several ways.  Did some have racks?  Were some or all originally “Damage Free” cars, or did that come later?

 

Do you know anything about the cars that went to P&WV?  They appear to have stenciling that would indicate as assignment.  Any idea to whom?  See attached.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Elden Gatwood



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: AC&Y 1400-1466 series gondolas

Mac shp
 

Acy1400 -1466 "installed" 12-1919.
1400 was converted to  x986 tie car in April 1930.
1401 1402 and 30 others were sold/transferred to Columbia steel shafting Pittsburg in July 1920.
 
 

 

 


Re: D&M 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #1

Bob Chapman
 

Brian Carlson asks: Bob since the D&M cars were postwar did they have the older 5/4 end or postwar IDE?
Brian -- Per Ed Hawkins' spreadsheet, D&M's 1947 cars had the same older 4-5 dreadnaught ends as the originals from the late 30s. Confirmed by a prototype photo of #2911. 


Fenton Wells writes: Wowzer Bob, hand lettering, that's quite a feat.
Fenton -- only during a pandemic....


Jim Brewer writes: I believe Ted Culotta did offer decals for this group of cars as a "special" set sometime in the past.
Jim -- Yeah, I saw Ted's listing when I was decal shopping, but out of stock (and probably no hurry to restock). Story of my life....


Chris Schlund writes: I especially like the simulated wood grain on the tack boards.
Chris -- Grey Prismacolor pencil scratchings.

Thanks to all for the encouraging comments,
Bob Chapman


Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Bruce Smith
 

Schuyler,

This has nothing to do with keeping messages on your machine. Since Lee was responding to a group email in the thread, he clearly has THAT message. That's all he needs. Clicking on the link at the bottom takes you to the thread, on the groups.io page, no PITA at all. A click later and you have all the messages and you can just scroll up. It's one of the HUGE advantages of Groups.io over Yehaw. 

Regards,
Bruce


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...>
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 12:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers
 

Bruce, that works if you keep all the messages on your machine.  I often wish people commenting on a photo would include the original link, as I am sure I am not the only one looking to keep my email loading down.

 

Yes, you can go to groups.io for this list and get back to the original post, but that can be a major PITA.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 1:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

 

Lee,

 

You can deal with this without emailing the group.

 

First, simply go the message thread on groups.io. You can do that from the link at the bottom of the message  that says "View/Reply Online". 

 

Then click on the link under the message to view all messages in the topic.

 

When you do this, you can scroll to the top message, and there you will clearly see two links in the original message. Clicking on those links will get you to the photos. 

 

If you scroll down a bit, you will see the message from Tim O'Conner specifically addressing the diagonal brace. That enlarged photo was attached to his message and can be seen right there on the web page.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Lee Thwaits <leeoldsa@...>
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 11:43 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

 

I did not receive the photo of flood damaged PFE reefers.  What was the
photo?

Lee Thwaits



Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Bruce, that works if you keep all the messages on your machine.  I often wish people commenting on a photo would include the original link, as I am sure I am not the only one looking to keep my email loading down.

 

Yes, you can go to groups.io for this list and get back to the original post, but that can be a major PITA.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 1:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

 

Lee,

 

You can deal with this without emailing the group.

 

First, simply go the message thread on groups.io. You can do that from the link at the bottom of the message  that says "View/Reply Online". 

 

Then click on the link under the message to view all messages in the topic.

 

When you do this, you can scroll to the top message, and there you will clearly see two links in the original message. Clicking on those links will get you to the photos. 

 

If you scroll down a bit, you will see the message from Tim O'Conner specifically addressing the diagonal brace. That enlarged photo was attached to his message and can be seen right there on the web page.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Lee Thwaits <leeoldsa@...>
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 11:43 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

 

I did not receive the photo of flood damaged PFE reefers.  What was the
photo?

Lee Thwaits



Re: Poultry cars : Bachmann news just received

Charlie Vlk
 

Enzo-

It is a little confusing….

By “new” my guess is that it has a unique part number.  

The screening, structural vertical and diagonal members, and chickens all seem to be printed on a standard 40’ riveted box car body (note rivets on the verticals and below them)   The door is indeed a different casting.   The giveaway that everything “poultry” except for the new door is a print job (admittedly clever) is that the “screening” and part of a “chicken” are on top of one of the grab irons.

They didn’t even use the “new” 40 Ft Box Car with separate ladders on this one, not that it would have made any difference at all.

No more posts from me on this subject as I hear the clink of keys and don’t want to be shoved into a cage…..

Charlie Vlk

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Enzo Fortuna
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 10:40 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Poultry cars : Bachmann news just received

 

Just read a mail news from Bachmann (I've buy some spare parts in the past..and this entitled me to receive this, sorry :)
He stated that a NEW car body was released :
https://shop.bachmanntrains.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=258_324_1132&products_id=7133
https://shop.bachmanntrains.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=&products_id=7136&zenid=fm74shvv6ai8u6lp58bdmh18c1
https://shop.bachmanntrains.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=&products_id=7135&zenid=fm74shvv6ai8u6lp58bdmh18c1
https://shop.bachmanntrains.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=&products_id=7136&zenid=fm74shvv6ai8u6lp58bdmh18c1

In HO only (so.. not for me) 
At your risk ?
Cheers from Italy
Enzo Fortuna

8141 - 8160 of 183678