Date   

Re: Non-standard height 1923 ARA Steel boxcars

Don Burn
 

Bill,

Are these different from the USRA Steel boxcars the Reading had that were 9' 3" with plate ends? I checked Tim's mention of CNJ, and definitely found they had 200 cars that were 1923 ARA design but taller.

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Sunday, July 12, 2020 11:53 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Non-standard height 1923 ARA Steel boxcars

Indeed the CNJ cars and the Reading has cars with plate ends and similar roofs to PRR, I think. No idea about the underframe however.

Bill Welch


Re: Non-standard height 1923 ARA Steel boxcars

Bill Welch
 

Indeed the CNJ cars and the Reading has cars with plate ends and similar roofs to PRR, I think. No idea about the underframe however.

Bill Welch


Re: Non-standard height 1923 ARA Steel boxcars

Tim O'Connor
 


Didn't the CNJ have some taller automobile cars (similar to X28)?


On 7/12/2020 10:55 AM, Don Burn wrote:
I was wondering besides the 5000 PRR X28, the 2000 B&O M-27 and M-27A, and the 25 High Point, Thomasville & Denton cars, were there any other 1923 ARA Steel boxcars with heights different from 8' 7"?

Don Burn

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Non-standard height 1923 ARA Steel boxcars

Don Burn
 

I was wondering besides the 5000 PRR X28, the 2000 B&O M-27 and M-27A, and the 25 High Point, Thomasville & Denton cars, were there any other 1923 ARA Steel boxcars with heights different from 8' 7"?

Don Burn


Re: Maximum Capacity Gondolas

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
The PRR gon that is the topic of the second paragraph is the lone PRR class G23 car - see link below:
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 8:17 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Maximum Capacity Gondolas

Maximum Capacity Gondolas

The text below is from the book, Car Shop Practice:

A Practical Textbook For The Instruction Of Mechanics, Helpers, And Apprentices In Railway Car Departments, Including Car Building And Repair Shops, Etc., /Prepared Under The Supervision And With The Approval Of An Editorial Advisory Board Of Railway Mechanical Officials.

This book was published by the Railway Training Institute in 1926.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

The 120-Ton Coal Car.—The largest freight car in commercial use at present is the 120-ton steel coal car. This is a type of gondola of which a large number were put into service on the Virginian Railway in 1921, after three years of exceptional test of four sample cars of this type and capacity had satisfied the managers of the road that such cars were both practicable and economical for their regular service. The most novel feature of this car is its size. It is 49 ft. 6 in. long by 10 ft. 23/4 in. wide inside, and has a depth at the center of 8 ft. 51/8 in. and at the ends over trucks of 7 ft. 41/4 in. The capacity is 3,840 cubic feet level full, or 4,450 cubic feet with a 30-degree heap. This latter figure, with coal at 54 lbs. per cubic foot, is equivalent to a capacity of 240,000 lbs., or 120 tons, which is the load the car is designed to carry. It has the general appearance of a modern quadruple hopper car, but has no hoppers, drop floors, or means of discharge other than the top; and is operated solely on the lines of the Virginian Railway, and dumped only in car dumping machines.

Maximum Capacity Gondola, P. R. R.—A steel gondola of slightly greater capacity even than the Virginian 120-ton car was exhibited in 1919 at the Atlantic City convention of the Master Car Builders’ Association, now merged in the Mechanical Division, American Railway Association. This was one of two cars then just completed for the Pennsylvania Railroad from designs prepared prior to the advent of the United States Railway Administration and approved by it for construction. The body of this car was fabricated from plates and pressed steel shapes after approved modern practice, while the trucks represented several new and novel features in design. The inside length of the car is 48 feet 6 in., height of side above rail 11 ft. 6 in., weight of car 74,600 lbs., load capacity 242,000 lbs., or 121 tons.


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

We used to have a lot of surplus places here in Michigan. They mostly started as military surplus dealers after WWII, then switched to industrial surplus. They had lots of hardware, electronics, assorted metals & plastics. One could spend hours wading through these places. All “cash & carry” and mostly in bulk. Their sources for such things slowly dried-up as many industries closed, and interested customers disappeared since nobody wants to really *DO* anything anymore. Same story for the used machinery dealers, especially for small machines. There’s hardly a one left around here anymore.

Even the new material industrial supplies have mostly disappeared. The few left are mostly very expensive, and they often don’t want to deal with small quantity buyers.  They want to sell a few thousand of something, or maybe a couple hundred pounds of it. Same for tools … if you want something better than Harbor Freight you’re out of luck. I’m forced to obtain most of my tools and materials via the internet.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jul 11, 2020, at 6:44 PM, George Corral <aileron44@...> wrote:

Great place to spend hours noodling around for surplus aircraft grade you name it.  Lived just around the corner.  Haven't been in that store for years.  Was Joe Factors then.  Left over store from aircraft production support businesses for Lockheed and war production.

Luky's Hardware

Another great place was San Fernando Hardware.  Don't know if it still exists.

George Corral


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Dennis Storzek
 

If one wants blackened, non-magnetic button head screws, McMaster Carr has them:
https://www.mcmaster.com/97763a314
 
The link should get you on the right page and then search for the desired length from there. Admittedly, 18-8 is not totally non-magnetic, but is much less so than steel.

Dennis Storzek


Re: About match-making (so to speak)

Doug Paasch
 

Nice shot of the sawdust burner as well as the loco.  A lot of good details seen on the sawdust burner that will help me model one.  Thanks for the unexpected detail!

   Doug Paasch


On Jul 11, 2020 5:56 PM, "Garth Groff and Sally Sanford" <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Gary,

Diamond Match also had a major plant at Red Bluff. Both plants were switched by 4-wheel GE diesels. I don't know about matches, but I think both plants were involved in dimensional lumber. When I was a youngster, there were Diamond Match hardware stores/lumber yards all over California, the Lowes of their day. Attached are my father's photos from the late 1960s or early 1970s. The yellow engine is Chico, the orange is Red Bluff.

The Diamond Match plant in Barber built at least one wooden electric locomotive, CE/NE/SN 701, for the Chico Electric Railway (later Northern Electric, then Sacramento Northern).  Diamond Match and the Northern Electric had a close relationship, and I think many of the NE officers were also associated with Diamond Match.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 1:23 PM Gary Ray <gerber1926@...> wrote:

Even though Barberton, Ohio, was the original site of Diamond Match, they had a hugh west coast factory occupying 280 acres in Barber, CA (now part of Chico).  The first air conditioning system for industry was developed for this facility for the summer months (101 yesterday @ 6 pm).  This helped eliminate Fumes that would build up causing phosphorus necrosis.  I’ve attached a couple of photos.  The first is feeding the blocks and the second is cutting blocks and setting matches into plates.  These photos are from the Ohio facility.

 

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@....io] On Behalf Of Thomas Klosterman
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] About match-making (so to speak)

 

Eventually (early 20th century) most of the matches in the US were manufactured in Barberton, Ohio [Diamond Match and others served by the A&BBRR (the "Belt Line") from interchange with the PRR] and Wadsworth, Ohio (nearby and served by the Erie). Many men in Barberton worked at the match factories. My father, as a youth, worked as a "block feeder," feeding blocks of (probably) these or similar blocks made from trees like this into a machine that produced matchsticks. My Grandfather worked in the dipping tank area. The Blue Tip Match was made in Wadsworth with the same equipment until the 1980's. The town still celebrates the Blue Tip Festival. 
Diamond match was started and owned by Ohio Columbus Barber (who planned and started the town), hence "Barberton." He also started the Belt Line (and many other manufacturers in town) and eventually sold it to a combination of PRR. B&O, Erie and maybe the AC&Y.  Interesting history here.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: End and Roof Color - WM #4001-4050 Series Boxcars #4001-4050

John King
 

Bob,

 

In the book Western Maryland Railway Revenue Equipment Boxcars and Refrigerator Cars (published by the WMRY Historical Society) the black and white builders photo of the first car in the 28801 to 29000 series clearly shows a darker color for the ends and roof and the author points out that the ends and roof were black.  The two b&w builders photos of the first car in the 4001 to 4050 series  show no difference in color or shade between the sides and the ends/roof and there is no mention of black roof or ends in the captions/description.   Based on the that I think it is a reasonable guess that the ends and roof of the 4001 was the same color as the sides.

 

John King  

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Robert Chapman
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 7:59 PM
To: STMFC E-List
Subject: [RealSTMFC] End and Roof Color - WM #4001-4050 Series Boxcars

 

Currently working on a boxcar project involving Western Maryland #4001-4050 series boxcar (postwar AAR, R-3-4 end, blt 7/51). 

 

My question -- when built, were the ends and/or roof of this series black car cement?

 

Comments:

In the Speedwitch decal data sheet (covering cars through the previous #29210-29300 series of 1951), Ted Culotta comments "the postwar design cars prominently featured ends with black car cement".

 

In RMJ 11/90, Ed Hawkins comments on the subsequent #4201-4450 series of 9/53, "(red) for sides and ends, color of roof...left to discretion of the modeler".

 

Looks like my series could go either way -- I'll welcome any new insight.

 

Thanks!

Bob Chapman


Maximum Capacity Gondolas

Bob Chaparro
 

Maximum Capacity Gondolas

The text below is from the book, Car Shop Practice:

A Practical Textbook For The Instruction Of Mechanics, Helpers, And Apprentices In Railway Car Departments, Including Car Building And Repair Shops, Etc., /Prepared Under The Supervision And With The Approval Of An Editorial Advisory Board Of Railway Mechanical Officials.

This book was published by the Railway Training Institute in 1926.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

The 120-Ton Coal Car.—The largest freight car in commercial use at present is the 120-ton steel coal car. This is a type of gondola of which a large number were put into service on the Virginian Railway in 1921, after three years of exceptional test of four sample cars of this type and capacity had satisfied the managers of the road that such cars were both practicable and economical for their regular service. The most novel feature of this car is its size. It is 49 ft. 6 in. long by 10 ft. 23/4 in. wide inside, and has a depth at the center of 8 ft. 51/8 in. and at the ends over trucks of 7 ft. 41/4 in. The capacity is 3,840 cubic feet level full, or 4,450 cubic feet with a 30-degree heap. This latter figure, with coal at 54 lbs. per cubic foot, is equivalent to a capacity of 240,000 lbs., or 120 tons, which is the load the car is designed to carry. It has the general appearance of a modern quadruple hopper car, but has no hoppers, drop floors, or means of discharge other than the top; and is operated solely on the lines of the Virginian Railway, and dumped only in car dumping machines.

Maximum Capacity Gondola, P. R. R.—A steel gondola of slightly greater capacity even than the Virginian 120-ton car was exhibited in 1919 at the Atlantic City convention of the Master Car Builders’ Association, now merged in the Mechanical Division, American Railway Association. This was one of two cars then just completed for the Pennsylvania Railroad from designs prepared prior to the advent of the United States Railway Administration and approved by it for construction. The body of this car was fabricated from plates and pressed steel shapes after approved modern practice, while the trucks represented several new and novel features in design. The inside length of the car is 48 feet 6 in., height of side above rail 11 ft. 6 in., weight of car 74,600 lbs., load capacity 242,000 lbs., or 121 tons.


End and Roof Color - WM #4001-4050 Series Boxcars #4001-4050

Bob Chapman
 

Currently working on a boxcar project involving Western Maryland #4001-4050 series boxcar (postwar AAR, R-3-4 end, blt 7/51). 

My question -- when built, were the ends and/or roof of this series black car cement?

Comments:
In the Speedwitch decal data sheet (covering cars through the previous #29210-29300 series of 1951), Ted Culotta comments "the postwar design cars prominently featured ends with black car cement".

In RMJ 11/90, Ed Hawkins comments on the subsequent #4201-4450 series of 9/53, "(red) for sides and ends, color of roof...left to discretion of the modeler".

Looks like my series could go either way -- I'll welcome any new insight.

Thanks!
Bob Chapman


Re: About match-making (so to speak)

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Gary,

Diamond Match also had a major plant at Red Bluff. Both plants were switched by 4-wheel GE diesels. I don't know about matches, but I think both plants were involved in dimensional lumber. When I was a youngster, there were Diamond Match hardware stores/lumber yards all over California, the Lowes of their day. Attached are my father's photos from the late 1960s or early 1970s. The yellow engine is Chico, the orange is Red Bluff.

The Diamond Match plant in Barber built at least one wooden electric locomotive, CE/NE/SN 701, for the Chico Electric Railway (later Northern Electric, then Sacramento Northern).  Diamond Match and the Northern Electric had a close relationship, and I think many of the NE officers were also associated with Diamond Match.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 1:23 PM Gary Ray <gerber1926@...> wrote:

Even though Barberton, Ohio, was the original site of Diamond Match, they had a hugh west coast factory occupying 280 acres in Barber, CA (now part of Chico).  The first air conditioning system for industry was developed for this facility for the summer months (101 yesterday @ 6 pm).  This helped eliminate Fumes that would build up causing phosphorus necrosis.  I’ve attached a couple of photos.  The first is feeding the blocks and the second is cutting blocks and setting matches into plates.  These photos are from the Ohio facility.

 

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Klosterman
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] About match-making (so to speak)

 

Eventually (early 20th century) most of the matches in the US were manufactured in Barberton, Ohio [Diamond Match and others served by the A&BBRR (the "Belt Line") from interchange with the PRR] and Wadsworth, Ohio (nearby and served by the Erie). Many men in Barberton worked at the match factories. My father, as a youth, worked as a "block feeder," feeding blocks of (probably) these or similar blocks made from trees like this into a machine that produced matchsticks. My Grandfather worked in the dipping tank area. The Blue Tip Match was made in Wadsworth with the same equipment until the 1980's. The town still celebrates the Blue Tip Festival. 
Diamond match was started and owned by Ohio Columbus Barber (who planned and started the town), hence "Barberton." He also started the Belt Line (and many other manufacturers in town) and eventually sold it to a combination of PRR. B&O, Erie and maybe the AC&Y.  Interesting history here.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

 

Forgot the photo

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "BRIAN PAUL EHNI via groups.io" <bpehni@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, July 11, 2020 at 6:41 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

 

Back in the early 90’s, I went looking at an electronics parts house in Nashville for usable stuff.

 

One bin was 2-56 x ¼” binder head screws. $1.00/pound. I still have a couple of pounds left.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 


Re: NKP 50ft double door box cars some with Viking roofs questions

Ray Breyer
 

Diagrams yes. Engineering drawings no.
For those you need to contact the NKPHTS.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Saturday, July 11, 2020, 04:41:30 PM CDT, ed_mines via groups.io <ed_mines@...> wrote:


my recollection is that NKP freight car diagrams used to be available on the internet under the umbrella "alphabet route"


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

 

Back in the early 90’s, I went looking at an electronics parts house in Nashville for usable stuff.

 

One bin was 2-56 x ¼” binder head screws. $1.00/pound. I still have a couple of pounds left.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of John Monrad <jrmonrad@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Friday, July 10, 2020 at 4:36 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler Mounting Screws

 


Dimensions per McMaster-Carr for 2-56 screw heads, 18-8 ss:

Type    Diameter (in)   Height (in)   /100 (1/4in)
Truss       0.194              0.053             $4.96
Binding*  0.181              0.050             $4.69
Pan          0.167              0.063             $4.49

*Slotted only

John Monrad


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Dan,
     Yes, these are blackened steel but in S scale they're just that much higher from the uncoupling magnets than in HO so I haven't seen any issues with that. I'm using the small 1/8" diameter cylindrical magnets that my friend Chuck Davis put me onto, these sit just inside the rails and do tend to pull steel wheels towards them but the coupler screws being farther away have not shown any problems. Am starting to get nickel silver wheels to alleviate the wheel pulling.
    I forgot to mention the screws I bought are self tapping too. Pic attached of the between the rails magnets.
       Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Coupler Mounting Screws

George Corral
 

Great place to spend hours noodling around for surplus aircraft grade you name it.  Lived just around the corner.  Haven't been in that store for years.  Was Joe Factors then.  Left over store from aircraft production support businesses for Lockheed and war production.

Luky's Hardware

Another great place was San Fernando Hardware.  Don't know if it still exists.

George Corral


Re: NKP 50ft double door box cars some with Viking roofs questions

ed_mines
 

my recollection is that NKP freight car diagrams used to be available on the internet under the umbrella "alphabet route"


Scalecoat II on resin freight cars, was Tru-Color

mopacfirst
 

I've changed the subject line since I'm changing the subject.

Recently I have used rattle-can Scalecoat II on several resin freight car models, without a primer.  Adhesion isn't wonderful, but it seems to be good enough to decal over.  And I did have the experience of pre-coating one or two cars with Tru-Color in tight spots (brushing) and I did see the paint just fall off.

My question is, am I setting myself up for trouble in the future?  Could the Scalecoat have some problems in the future where it just peels off or doesn't stand up to an 0-5-0 picking up the car?  I was doing a bunch of painting in a short time, about the time the primer discussion really got going on here, and I'd pretty much gone direct from Floquil to Scalecoat.

I have acquired some of the Tamiya primer and I believe I ought to adopt it as standard from now on, I'm just wondering if I've created a problem with what I've done in the last year.  An example of the paint schemes I've applied was a Sunshine CB&Q 40' double door painted in Chinese red with Microscale decals.

Ron Merrick





Tru Color paint on Resin Freight Cars
Tony Thompson
1:33pm  

Scott, I use their surfacer but often just grab a can of One of their light grays. Seems to work fine,
Tony Thompson  

 
 
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 

On Jul 11, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:

 
Hi; already we have had the the universal opinion of yes for the use of primer on resin before a Tru-Color coat. Decades ago, I tried my 1st (and last) attempt to paint AccuPaint on an un-primered resin box car. The paint fell off in sheets! I wondered at that time if this would be a useful idea for making scale sized thickness canvas tarps!
 
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
 
 
 
 
Group,
 
Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?
 
Thanks
 
Tim Alund
 
-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate
Andy Carlson
1:30pm  

 
Hi; already we have had the the universal opinion of yes for the use of primer on resin before a Tru-Color coat. Decades ago, I tried my 1st (and last) attempt to paint AccuPaint on an un-primered resin box car. The paint fell off in sheets! I wondered at that time if this would be a useful idea for making scale sized thickness canvas tarps!
 
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
 
 
 
 
Group,
 
Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?
 
Thanks
 
Tim Alund
 
-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate

I keep both the Tamiya red oxide and light grey primer handy and use before any rolling stock painting.  I have a bin of Tr-Color on hand but these days use it and PBL Star Brand for matching to Vallejo acrylics usually Vallejo Model Color for hand brushing. One color I have yet to match is the PBL Star Brand SP-UP Dark Olive to represent the SP color Dark Olive in Japan for passenger equipment. I don't do much passenger these days but when I do out comes the PreVal sprayer.

For a couple of cars both plastic and resin, the Tamiya red oxide was close enough to the color I wanted that I just sprayed the car a second time and used that as the final coat before on to the Future and decalling.

Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek

 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate

Tony Thompson wrote:

You must! The Tru-Color will not adhere to resin at all. Prime any way you like (I prefer Tamiya rattle cans).
Tony,

Which Tamiya primer do you prefer to use?

Scott Seders

 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate
Pierre Oliver
12:58pm  

ABSOLUTELY!
I had a huge failure with Tru-color paint on a custom project that wound up costing me a lot of money.
Tamiya Fine Surface Primer is a great choice, the tru-color primer is not worth bothering with, in my experience

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 

On 7/11/20 3:42 p.m., Tim via groups.io wrote:
Group,

Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?

Thanks

Tim Alund

 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate
Tony Thompson
12:54pm  

Tim Alund wrote:

Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?
  You must! The Tru-Color will not adhere to resin at all. Prime any way you like (I prefer Tamiya rattle cans).


Tony Thompson
tony@...

 

1 person liked this


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate
Paul Doggett
12:50pm  

Tim

Definitely I us a rattle can of fine car primer Trucolor will not stick to resin without a good primer otherwise it’s good paint.

Paul Doggett.    England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 

On 11 Jul 2020, at 20:42, Tim via groups.io <Atoolman2@...> wrote:

Group,

Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?

Thanks

Tim Alund


 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate
O Fenton Wells
12:48pm  

Yes, in my humble opinion
Fenton
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 3:42 PM Tim via groups.io <Atoolman2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Group,

Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?

Thanks

Tim Alund




 
--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate
Tim
12:42pm  

Group,

Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?

Thanks

Tim Alund

 

 


From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>

 
 
 
Reply to Group DiscardPrivate
 

 


Re: Tru Color paint on Resin Freight Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Scott, I use their surfacer but often just grab a can of One of their light grays. Seems to work fine,
Tony Thompson  


On Jul 11, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:


Hi; already we have had the the universal opinion of yes for the use of primer on resin before a Tru-Color coat. Decades ago, I tried my 1st (and last) attempt to paint AccuPaint on an un-primered resin box car. The paint fell off in sheets! I wondered at that time if this would be a useful idea for making scale sized thickness canvas tarps!

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA




Group,

Question for you all. I’m painting a Yarmouth resin car and going to be using Tru Color paints. This is my first time using Tru Color on a train car. Would you guys recommend priming the car first?

Thanks

Tim Alund

-=-=-=-=-=-=-

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