Date   

Re: Photo: Ward Boiler On Illinois Central Flatcar

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:21 AM, Donald B. Valentine wrote:

Interesting trucks of a design I don’t recall ever seeing before. Wonder what the height of the

deck above the rail is for tis IC flat car?

Don, Those are Ajax trucks, an early cast steel pedestal type truck. If you squint hard at the photo, you can barely see AJAX cast in large letters in the sideframe. Ajax trucks, which were manufactured by American Steel Foundries early in the twentieth century, rate one photo in the 1906 Car Builder's Dictionary. That better photo shows that the bolster or transoms (I haven't determined if these are floating bolster trucks) attach to the top of the sideframe, so the center plate is at normal height.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 384661

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Garth,
 
Looking into my 12-1930 ORER, I see that P&LE has very few flat cars - in fact, this is all I could find:
 
P&LE 6883-6884  30ft length  150,000 lb  (2 cars total)
P&LE 6885-6889  36ft length  200,000 lb  (5 cars total)
 
If I strain my eyes, and use a little imagination, I could just about get myself to say that the number on the side of the flatcar image you send reads as "6884".
 
The image is dated 1941 (11 years later than my ORER), but it might be as simple as it's got to be one of these 7 cars, and 6884 just might be it! If this is so, you found one member of a two-car class - wow!
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 4:46 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 384661

Friends,

Did anyone else notice what appears to be a rather short P&LE flat car on the hill just above the gondola? I was able to pull the attached photo off the web site. Can't read the number.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:34 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: PRR Gondola 384661

A 1941 photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A8223.7300.RR/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Erie 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #2

O Fenton Wells
 

Good looking build and nothing better than making lemonade out of lemons.
Fenton

On Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 5:17 PM Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:
Upon opening the second of my two 1937 AAR IMWX boxcar kits from my deep stash, I discovered not much more than a carbody. No roof, no detail sprue. Then came the recall – the kit was a parts donor for a kitbash project. 

The missing roof presented the opportunity to substitute a Viking roof from Des Plaines Hobbies, and the missing parts to be replaced with contemporary upgrades. Among 1937 AAR’s equipped with the Viking roof was the Erie, an good prototype to further diversify the boxcar fleet.

Added details include Tichy 8/8 ladders, Apex running board from Yarmouth Models, Kadee Ajax brakewheel, and the interesting National Type B trucks from Proto 2000. The prototype had grabs with brackets much smaller than Kadee’s -- almost looking like wire grabs. Decals are Speedwitch Media.

The prototype often sported black ends and sometimes a black roof; I opted for both. I'll welcome any suggestions and/or photos re a weathering approach that would look credible on a black Viking roof....

The missing parts proved a stroke of good fortune, resulting in a distinctive model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman 


 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Erie 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #2

Brian Carlson
 

Bob. I’m working on one of these. Waist paint color did you use? 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 13, 2020, at 5:17 PM, Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:


Upon opening the second of my two 1937 AAR IMWX boxcar kits from my deep stash, I discovered not much more than a carbody. No roof, no detail sprue. Then came the recall – the kit was a parts donor for a kitbash project. 

The missing roof presented the opportunity to substitute a Viking roof from Des Plaines Hobbies, and the missing parts to be replaced with contemporary upgrades. Among 1937 AAR’s equipped with the Viking roof was the Erie, an good prototype to further diversify the boxcar fleet.

Added details include Tichy 8/8 ladders, Apex running board from Yarmouth Models, Kadee Ajax brakewheel, and the interesting National Type B trucks from Proto 2000. The prototype had grabs with brackets much smaller than Kadee’s -- almost looking like wire grabs. Decals are Speedwitch Media.

The prototype often sported black ends and sometimes a black roof; I opted for both. I'll welcome any suggestions and/or photos re a weathering approach that would look credible on a black Viking roof....

The missing parts proved a stroke of good fortune, resulting in a distinctive model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman 


 
<DSCN8263.JPG>
<Erie 1937 IMWX+.jpg>


Erie 1937 AAR Boxcar – IMWX Upgrade #2

Bob Chapman
 

Upon opening the second of my two 1937 AAR IMWX boxcar kits from my deep stash, I discovered not much more than a carbody. No roof, no detail sprue. Then came the recall – the kit was a parts donor for a kitbash project. 

The missing roof presented the opportunity to substitute a Viking roof from Des Plaines Hobbies, and the missing parts to be replaced with contemporary upgrades. Among 1937 AAR’s equipped with the Viking roof was the Erie, an good prototype to further diversify the boxcar fleet.

Added details include Tichy 8/8 ladders, Apex running board from Yarmouth Models, Kadee Ajax brakewheel, and the interesting National Type B trucks from Proto 2000. The prototype had grabs with brackets much smaller than Kadee’s -- almost looking like wire grabs. Decals are Speedwitch Media.

The prototype often sported black ends and sometimes a black roof; I opted for both. I'll welcome any suggestions and/or photos re a weathering approach that would look credible on a black Viking roof....

The missing parts proved a stroke of good fortune, resulting in a distinctive model.

Regards,
Bob Chapman 


 


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 384661

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Friends,

Did anyone else notice what appears to be a rather short P&LE flat car on the hill just above the gondola? I was able to pull the attached photo off the web site. Can't read the number.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:34 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: PRR Gondola 384661

A 1941 photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A8223.7300.RR/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Match and Strawboard Making

Matt Goodman
 

Thanks Eric - I’ll take a look through. It might fill out some of more details on strawboard in general. The ownership part is turning out to be a real rabbit hole - mainly thanks to Barber being involved in merging 22 strawboard companies into American Strawboard. At some point, I need to limit the scope creep. Maybe once the web page is done.

Thomas, Eric’s link may answer your question about Rittman. Barber moved the his Strawboard works from New Portage to Barberton around 1891. The source described the latter being west of the former, so… maybe?

Sources: Portage Strawboard (also search on Barberton for additional detail)

Matt

On Jul 13, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

This Atlas and Industrial Geography of Summit County (Ohio) is a fascinating look back at Akron, Barberton, and other communities. The maps are similar to Sanborn maps but document the infrastructure. Barberton index is on page 85. Maps featuring Diamond Match, American Strawboard, Babcock & Wilcox, and the American Sewer Pipe plant (later becoming American Vitrified) are on pages 87, 88, and 93.
 
Barberton would make a great setting for manageable sized steam era layout. Don’t miss the pages in the last third of the book with period images of factories, homes, and businesses.
 
 
Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Thomas Klosterman
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 8:50 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Match and Strawboard Making
 
Yes, indeed, Barberton was New Portage early on. The location of the central part of each was not the quite same, but geographically close. The center of Barberton is a little south of New Portage, both on the Ohio Canal.

Are the early (or any of) these  companies related to the paper box company in Rittman, Ohio? This is west of Barberton on the old Erie.  I think it had the name of Ohio Straw Board for a while. 



Re: Floquil laquer over Tamiya Primer

Gary Ray
 

Thanks, Tony.  Going out to airbrush now.

Gary Ray

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 12:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Floquil laquer over Tamiya Primer

 

Gary Ray wrote:



I’m painting some aluminum siding and have primed it with Tamiya Primer.  I’m using some of my old Floquil.  Am I safe airbrushing it over the Tamiya?

 

     I have done the same with no problem, but I airbrush so the paint arrives not very wet, so my experience might not be definitive. 

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 




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Re: Floquil laquer over Tamiya Primer

Tony Thompson
 

Gary Ray wrote:

I’m painting some aluminum siding and have primed it with Tamiya Primer.  I’m using some of my old Floquil.  Am I safe airbrushing it over the Tamiya?


     I have done the same with no problem, but I airbrush so the paint arrives not very wet, so my experience might not be definitive. 

Tony Thompson




Floquil laquer over Tamiya Primer

Gary Ray
 

I’m painting some aluminum siding and have primed it with Tamiya Primer.  I’m using some of my old Floquil.  Am I safe airbrushing it over the Tamiya?

Thanks in advance,

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

_._,_._,_




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Re: Non-standard height 1923 ARA Steel boxcars

Kevin von der Lippe
 

HPT&D did indeed sell off 20 of their 10’ IH 1923 ARA cars, per a letter to the O.C. Duryea Corp. dated November 1948, to the Exporting and Importing Company of Dallas, Texas.  According to the correspondence, ten of those cars went to Texas for ultimate use in Mexico.  The other ten were shipped to FEC in Jacksonville for repairs, ultimately ending up on the West India Fruit & Steamship Company.

 

Kevin W. von der Lippe

Oak Ridge, NC

 


Re: Intermountain HO Scale Roof Needed

Brian Carlson
 

John. I don’t any spare, But get the red caboose or IMWX one.  The Intermountain rectangular panel roof is tooled incorrectly. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 13, 2020, at 2:21 PM, golden1014 via groups.io <golden1014@...> wrote:


Hi Guys,

Does anyone have a spare roof for an Intermountain 1937 box car?  I'm rebuilding an old Sunshine war emergency car and am in need of a replacement roof.  The original part was too big, but after a few measurements a replacement from Intermountain--or Red Caboose I guess--will work.

If you've got something please let me know offline at Golden1014@....

Danke!

John Golden
Ramstein-Miesenbach, Germany

RPM Blog: https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Intermountain HO Scale Roof Needed

golden1014
 

Hi Guys,

Does anyone have a spare roof for an Intermountain 1937 box car?  I'm rebuilding an old Sunshine war emergency car and am in need of a replacement roof.  The original part was too big, but after a few measurements a replacement from Intermountain--or Red Caboose I guess--will work.

If you've got something please let me know offline at Golden1014@....

Danke!

John Golden
Ramstein-Miesenbach, Germany

RPM Blog: https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: Photo: Ward Boiler On Illinois Central Flatcar

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

   Interesting trucks of a design I don’t recall ever seeing before. Wonder what the height of the

deck above the rail is for tis IC flat car? Unless the body bolster is quite thick it would seem that

a lower deck height might be available with such trucks.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: An image of ACL ventilated boxcars

thomas christensen
 

A few more paint diagrams and notes.
Tom Christensen 

















On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 5:50 PM, palmettoltd82
<palmettoLTD@...> wrote:
The original ACL Atlantic Coast Despatch paint scheme (yellow ochre body, boxcar red & white herald, black lettering, boxcar red trim) was officially dropped in 1929 in favor of the more cost effective brown with white lettering.  The attached photo of Rich Yoders O-scale O-17 model shows the pre-1929 paint scheme.   The pre-29 paint scheme was also applied to ACL subsidiary roads such as the Washington & Vandermere (with ACD herald) and the Winston-Salem Southbound Rwy (sans ACD herald).  The ACL also modified 50 class O-12 vents for express service. The cars (Nos. 1800-1849) were painted Pullman dark green and lettered in white.  The 0-12s were returned to the freight service with the conversion of the 50 USRA DS rebuilds (1850-1899).  Hope this helps.


Re: Photos: Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogheny Hoppers 63133 With Coal Loads

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photos: Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Youghiogheny Hoppers 63133 With Coal Loads
Some 1917 photos from the Historic Pittsburgh website.
Scroll on the photos to enlarge them.
63133
63128
63134

     Nice photos of VERY full loads. The "Pee-Mickey," as it was known in Pittsburgh, though long part of P&LE, remained in view for many years because P&LE apparently saw no need to rush reprinting the reporting marks.
      As late as 1953, the ORER shows over 3000 PMcK&Y cars among the 26,000 P&LE fleet.

Tony Thompson




Re: Non-standard height 1923 ARA Steel boxcars

Eric Lombard
 

Hi, Everyone....
Don Burn asked : "...were there any other 1923 ARA Steel boxcars with heights different from 8' 7"?"
It appears that 10 of the HPT&D cars were sold to West India Fruit and Steam Ship Co. in 1948 as WIF 101-110. I have not discovered any primary documentation for this transaction. However, comparative ORER counts, ORER dimensions, and photos provide a strong case for this. The HPT&D cars were built with a unique SSC design door that also appears on the WIF cars, for example. Here is a photo for comparison of WIF 106, which if actually taken in Vancouver, BC, is a very, very long way from Havana. The WIF&SS Co. went under in August of 1961, a victim of the Cuban revolution. Disposition of their several series of box cars is unknown to me.

Happy Rails to you....
Eric L
Homewood, IL



On Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 9:55 AM Don Burn <burn@...> wrote:
I was wondering besides the 5000 PRR X28, the 2000 B&O M-27 and M-27A, and the 25 High Point, Thomasville & Denton cars, were there any other 1923 ARA Steel boxcars with heights different from 8' 7"?

Don Burn






Re: Photo: PRR Ventilated Boxcar

Eric Hansmann
 

Many early Pennsy boxcars had left-opening doors. It would fall in line that a ventilated door on a Pennsy car would open to the right, leaving the solid door to open left.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenneth Montero
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 11:52 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Ventilated Boxcar

 

Note the vents near the top of the car, just under the fascia. Also, the ventilated door is the right side door, which I had not seen before.

 

The Pennsylvania operated (but did not own) the New York, Philadelphia and Norfolk, which ran down the Delmarva Peninsula into Virginia. That area was a major truck farming area for the Northeastern cities markets. Lots of produce went on that line from the Delmarva Peninsula farms to those markets. It would make sense for the Pennsylvania to have ventilator cars for that produce.

 

Ken Montero

On 07/13/2020 11:38 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

 

 

Photo: PRR Ventilated Boxcar

A 1914 photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A201203.1914.8099/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

The last four car numbers are 8331. This car was build in 1897.

PRR 103558 is in the background.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Ventilated Boxcar

Kenneth Montero
 

Note the vents near the top of the car, just under the fascia. Also, the ventilated door is the right side door, which I had not seen before.

The Pennsylvania operated (but did not own) the New York, Philadelphia and Norfolk, which ran down the Delmarva Peninsula into Virginia. That area was a major truck farming area for the Northeastern cities markets. Lots of produce went on that line from the Delmarva Peninsula farms to those markets. It would make sense for the Pennsylvania to have ventilator cars for that produce.

Ken Montero

On 07/13/2020 11:38 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: PRR Ventilated Boxcar

A 1914 photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A201203.1914.8099/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

The last four car numbers are 8331. This car was build in 1897.

PRR 103558 is in the background.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Hopper Cars Receiving Coal

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

Ben and others are right; this is most certainly a ballast cleaning train.

 

I got educated up on the by Al Buchan, Bob Yagodich and others over a period of years.

 

It was important to clean out ballast as it became clogged with fines, over time, to prevent water build up in same that would promote blow-outs or undermining of the roadbed or fill.  Also to prevent water build-up that would cause waterlogging and rotting of ties.  Good pore space in ballast promoted rapid drainage of the ballast to the ditches on either side.

 

Ballast-cleaning evolved greatly over the years, from crews of manual laborers cleaning the ballast mostly by hand tools and side-casting, to something like this, in which a trains of hoppers with conveyors (except for the last one to left), with a ballast cleaner up front near the engine, was dragged slowly over the track, removing contaminated ballast, and conveying it to the next to last car filled, for disposal into a hopper.  The entire train was filled back to front, then taken to a dump trestle to dump the hopprs.  Ballast was replaced by clean-ballast-containg hoppers with spreaders mounted beneath, where track gangs pushed/shoveled the ballast into place between and alongside the tie structure.

 

These are mid-life H21A in their glory:  Top chord reinforcements in full view, prior to the large H21A to H21E rebuildings.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 12:21 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Hopper Cars Receiving Coal

 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

"Photo: PRR Hopper Cars Receiving Coal

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

Blockedhttps://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A200905.233.HF/viewer "

 

This is actually a ballast cleaning train.

 

 

Ben Hom

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