Date   

Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar 52592

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Friends,

The information attached to this photo gives some very specific information about location, etc. It does not tell us the marque of the truck. I suspect it is an Autocar of about 1930 vintage, but the radiator top raised above the hood isn't quite right based on my books. Otherwise, radiator bars, fender shape, hood louvres and cab are all very close. Any truck mavens out there want to chime in?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 5:51 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: PRR Boxcar 52592

A 1933 photo from the Hoboken Historical Museum:

https://hoboken.pastperfectonline.com/photo/DCC778E9-2C39-486E-9A83-983218062208

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Good view of the "B" end.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Livestock Cars With Roof Hatches

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Livestock Cars With Roof Hatches

A 1910 photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society:

https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Image/IM24356

The photo shows a string of livestock cars with roof hatches.

The hatches may have been for the loading of bulk commodities or, given the date of the photo, the loading of feed and water into livestock cars of an early design.

Does anyone recognize this particular car design from just the roof hatch detail?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Steam Era Spray trains

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

The Rock Island had a very similar car, 95270.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 21, 2020 1:24 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Steam Era Spray trains

Doug and All-
The image is too dark to see for sure, but is that a six-wheel truck under the close end?
Charlie Vlk


The M&StL converted a gas electric, GE-25, to weed spray duty in the late 50s. They added a control booth in the rear of the body with extra windows, spray arms, etc. The unit towed one or two tankcars. It was destroyed by fire in 1963. North American created a weed sprayer in the late 50s, which ran on several roads in the mid-west.




Re: Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar

Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 05:09 PM, Matt Goodman wrote:
The radial lubrication streaking on the left most wheel face caught my eye. Probably from a leak through the rear seal while standing still.
 
Solid bearing journal boxes don't really have seals... the rear opening was closed by a "dust guard" which in the period of this photo would have been wood.. The oil level was maintained below the level of the axle. if the box was over filled, the excess quickly ran out the back. In operation, capillary action brought the oil up into the ball of wool yarn "waste" (short strands of yarn of no use for weaving) where it wetted the exposed bottom of the axle. When the axle turned the oil was drawn in between the axle journal and the journal bearing, and the car actually rode on a film of oil. This was a "total loss" lubrication system, as the oil spread across the journal it came out both the front and back edges of the bearing, which were shoulders that acted as thrust bearings to keep the truck aligned with the wheels. The oil that crept out the back was flung out and ended up on the face of the wheel, which is why there are no rusty wheels during the steam era.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Kadee C&O PS-1 boxcar 1952 For Progress livery

Schleigh Mike
 

Yes, Tim----

C&O 18712, from the second 500 with Superior 6P Sup 1 doors.  Same order from 6-52.  This car re-weighed 7-56.  Black ends, can't be sure about roof.

Regards from Grove City, Penna.    Mike Schleigh

On Tuesday, July 21, 2020, 06:05:47 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



With black ends & roof? - I have several later color shots of these and there is no indication
that the ends or roof were black. Has anyone seen photos of them with black roof & ends?



On 7/21/2020 3:52 PM, Curt Fortenberry wrote:
My dealer just informed me that the Kadee C&O PS-1 boxcar painted for as delivered For Progress scheme in 1952 has been released.  This has been a moving target in the Kadee production schedule but good to see it done.

https://www.kadee.com/ho-scale-rtr-cars-c-274_278_290/5023-ho-scale-chesapeake-ohio-co-18499-rtr-40-ps1-boxcar-p-2023.htm

Curt Fortenberry

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Steam Era Spray trains

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

Some of the earliest weed burners were built by the McKean Motor Car Company around 1906, I believe.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Don Burn <burn@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 21, 2020 11:45 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Steam Era Spray trains

On weed burners, I believe they were around before the 1940's.  See https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth174608/ for a patent from the 1800's for a railroad weed burner.  I am trying to find the exact reference but I have a memory of interurban weed burners, that I believe were pre-WWII.

Don Burn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 11:29 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Steam Era Spray trains

The M&StL converted a gas electric, GE-25, to weed spray duty in the late 50s. They added a control booth in the rear of the body with extra windows, spray arms, etc. The unit towed one or two tankcars. It was destroyed by fire in 1963. North American created a weed sprayer in the late 50s, which ran on several roads in the mid-west.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4703492
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=771461

Fairmont Railway Motor Co (the speeder outfit) made weed sprayers, as well as weed burners and weed mowers. Fairmont purchased a weed mower in 1938, the Rawls Company. Their first weed burner was in the mid 40s, which took on a new duty during nasty winter in Chicago when the burner was used to "de-ice" switches in the yard. Their first weed sprayer was the late 40s. Though the little single piston engine was first developed in 1907 for ag use, including to power orchard sprayers.

I don't believe sprayers came into widespread use until weed killing chemicals known as herbicides were developed. 2, 4-D came about in WWII, and was made available after the war, but it did not kill grasses, just broad leaf plants. The next major development in weed control was atrazine in the mid-50s.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of csxt5555 via groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2020 12:39 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Steam Era Spray trains

Can someone point me to some information on weed spraying trains of the mid 50’s?

Thanks
Kevin










Re: Steam Era Spray trains

Steve and Barb Hile
 

The first link to the Nalco train in Naperville provided some fun for us here as it shows the Loomis Street crossing nearly 60 years ago. The hose and garage visible on the right side are still there!

Steve Hile

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Steam Era Spray trains

The M&StL converted a gas electric, GE-25, to weed spray duty in the late 50s. They added a control booth in the rear of the body with extra windows, spray arms, etc. The unit towed one or two tankcars. It was destroyed by fire in 1963. North American created a weed sprayer in the late 50s, which ran on several roads in the mid-west.
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4703492
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=771461

Fairmont Railway Motor Co (the speeder outfit) made weed sprayers, as well as weed burners and weed mowers. Fairmont purchased a weed mower in 1938, the Rawls Company. Their first weed burner was in the mid 40s, which took on a new duty during nasty winter in Chicago when the burner was used to "de-ice" switches in the yard. Their first weed sprayer was the late 40s. Though the little single piston engine was first developed in 1907 for ag use, including to power orchard sprayers.

I don't believe sprayers came into widespread use until weed killing chemicals known as herbicides were developed. 2, 4-D came about in WWII, and was made available after the war, but it did not kill grasses, just broad leaf plants. The next major development in weed control was atrazine in the mid-50s.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of csxt5555 via groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2020 12:39 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Steam Era Spray trains

Can someone point me to some information on weed spraying trains of the mid 50’s?

Thanks
Kevin


Re: Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar

Matt Goodman
 

The radial lubrication streaking on the left most wheel face caught my eye. Probably from a leak through the rear seal while standing still.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On Jul 21, 2020, at 5:58 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar
A circa 1920 Shorpy photo from the National Photo Company Collection:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: A better pin vise

Robert Allan
 

Another vote for Starrett. Good clamp, easy to handle, light to use.

Bob Allan
Omaha


Re: Kadee C&O PS-1 boxcar 1952 For Progress livery

Chuck Cover
 

I wonder how many Kadee PS-1 boxcars every model railroader already owns?  Probably more than is prototypically correct.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Bay Terminal tank cars?

nyc3001 .
 
Edited

While looking through the reporting mark summary and freight train consists of the NYC Toledo-Lake division available on Terry Link's canadasouthern website, it appeared that tank cars carrying the reporting mark BT (Bay Terminal Railroad) were frequent visitors to the Central. Jerry Britton's pennsyrr blog indicated that they had 325 tanks. Does anyone have any info about these cars and how one could be modeled? 

-Phil


Re: Kadee C&O PS-1 boxcar 1952 For Progress livery

Tim O'Connor
 


With black ends & roof? - I have several later color shots of these and there is no indication
that the ends or roof were black. Has anyone seen photos of them with black roof & ends?



On 7/21/2020 3:52 PM, Curt Fortenberry wrote:
My dealer just informed me that the Kadee C&O PS-1 boxcar painted for as delivered For Progress scheme in 1952 has been released.  This has been a moving target in the Kadee production schedule but good to see it done.

https://www.kadee.com/ho-scale-rtr-cars-c-274_278_290/5023-ho-scale-chesapeake-ohio-co-18499-rtr-40-ps1-boxcar-p-2023.htm

Curt Fortenberry

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar

A circa 1920 Shorpy photo from the National Photo Company Collection:

https://www.shorpy.com/node/23403

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Milwaukee Road Boxcar With Electric Water Heaters Load

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Milwaukee Road Boxcar With Electric Water Heaters Load

A circa 1930s photo from the Musser Public Library:

http://www.umvphotoarchive.org/digital/collection/scdpl/id/520/rec/143

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

By the way, I am collecting photos of freight cars with banners for a future presentation so if anyone cares to share a photo(s) with me, please reply off group. Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Rock Island Boxcar With A Load Of Radios

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Rock Island Boxcar With A Load Of Radios

A 1930 photo from the Musser Public Library:

http://www.umvphotoarchive.org/digital/collection/muspl/id/1332/rec/273

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: NYC Boxcar 109272

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: NYC Boxcar 109272

A 1911 photo from the Musser Public Library:

http://www.umvphotoarchive.org/digital/collection/muspl/id/1404/rec/47

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Good 3/4 view showing the "A" end.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: DL&W Boxcar 51974 With Friendship Train Load

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: DL&W Boxcar 51974 With Friendship Train Load

A circa 1947 photo from the Hoboken Historical Museum:

https://hoboken.pastperfectonline.com/photo/4F3DFDE0-FD87-45AA-9699-144892125070

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: PRR Boxcar 52592

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Boxcar 52592

A 1933 photo from the Hoboken Historical Museum:

https://hoboken.pastperfectonline.com/photo/DCC778E9-2C39-486E-9A83-983218062208

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Good view of the "B" end.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: A better pin vise

charles slater
 

Bill I was having the same problems with pin vises going bad and would not hold the # 70-80 drill bits anymore. I got two new ones from Micro-Mart and I could not even get a #80 drill in the small collet
on one of them as all the jaws were closed up tight. The other would not close down to hold anything smaller than a #75 drill. They both went into the trash. 
I found one at our local train show in March made by Zona Tools and it is the VERY BEST, by far, one I have ever used. Go to    www.zonatool.net   and the one I have is their #37-120 it is rather odd looking and has a large ball on the end that fits in the palm of your hand and you turn the chuck with your thumb and index finger. It is very comfortable to use and I have never dropped it. Try it I think you will love it also.
Charlie Slater
Zona Tool manufacturers and sells the highest quality hand saws and cutting tools.
www.zonatool.net


Sent from Outlook



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A better pin vise
 
I have found over the years that mos tpin vises for small drills have a short lifespan.  I have resorted to using a small pin vice (no swivel head) from   Micro Mark #15116.  In fact I keep 10 of them on my workbench loaded with 71 to 80 drills.  This saves a lot of time.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "ed_mines via groups.io" <ed_mines@...>
Date: 7/21/20 7:54 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A better pin vise

I bought an expensive one from a site I learned about on the old STMFC forum which sells to professional machinists - it worked real well and wasn't outrageously expensive.
I've been using carbide micro drill bits used to drill PC boards. I buy them from ebay. They work pretty well on most materials but they easily snap.
Haven't bought any carbide bits recently but when I did the price was right.


Re: Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I'll add that the trucks look identical to the ones on this car (see attached image). This is a move of a gun on the PRR thru Altoona PA in Dec 1918. (Note that a lower resolution copy of this same image is also available online at https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_ME04655 )
 
Also, there is a second image of a car, identical to Bethlehem Steel 900, this time with LV reporting marks available online at https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_ME04356 . It is - somewhat surprisingly - in the Hagley PRR Photo Archive and it has a PRR photo archive number ME4356 inscribed upon the negative! There is no question in my mind that  the LV car is the same car as Bethlehem 900.
 
I'm starting to conclude that these trucks were moved and rebuilt/repurposed/resold at least a few times in their lifetime.
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 5:01 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

Hi Bob, Bruce and List Members,
 
The image Bruce attached, of Bethlehem 900, sure looks a whole lot like this PRR car at the link below...
 
 
And the trucks in the images Bob posted sure look to be a match as well.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 5:33 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

Fascinating. These trucks are identical to those under Bethlehem Steel 900 in the attached photo. 

The PRR flat car(s) carrying "Big Bertha" to the Columbian Exposition were PRR class FG, 5116a, 5116b, 5117a, and 5117b. Class FG could be assembled as either a single car with 4 trucks, 2 span bolsters, and a bridge, or two cars consisting a two trucks and a bridge each. 

Clearly, the photo posted by Bob uses the load as the carbody, which was not at all unusual. You can see the pivot points on each car under the load. 

Ed - My interpretation of the numbering of the trucks is that the TWO in the photo Bob posted are the trucks for PRR 425483. The bridge has been replaced by the load. There are another two trucks and car body/bridge that would make up 425484

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 2:57 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars
 

I suspected that it was a PRR car….funny that it doesn’t have any reporting marks other than the number, at least that I noticed on the photo.

This may be the “car” used to haul the Krupp Gun barrel to the 1893 Columbian Exposition.  I don’t think I retained any pictures of that car but the European-style “trucks” look familiar.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of spsalso via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 2:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

The drawbar is that big thing on top with all the writing on it.

A question might be whether the whole assembly (car and load) was ever mixing into a generic train, or was handled individually.  The second photo hints at the latter.  Maybe.

Too, a person might wonder how the subject car was returned empty.  Maybe that gon is carrying the "return drawbar".

The car is listed in my November 1926 ORER as PRR 425483 and 425484 (In the photos, it's 425483 A and B).  Capacity is listed as 150,000 pounds.  It's called a "Flat, Gun and Cable Steel".



Ed

Edward Sutorik









On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 11:37 AM, mel perry wrote:

no drawbar or coupler?

mel perry

 

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