Date   

Re: Photo: Livestock Cars With Roof Hatches

Bob Chaparro
 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Nice car, Bob!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chapman
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 12:38 PM
To: STMFC E-List <main@Realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

 

Circa 1990, Front Range offered styrene kits for variations of postwar AAR boxcars with R-3-4 improved dreadnaught ends and diagonal panel roofs, a cache of which I unburied in my pandemic project to drain the stash of long-slumbering styrene kits. One of the variations is a 12-panel welded car with 8-foot doors – a prototype fielded by Wabash subsidiary NJI&I, which acquired two 50-car series in 1/50.   

 

The Front Range carbody is nicely executed, but with add-on parts well below contemporary standards. New parts include a Yarmouth Models US Gypsum runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders/bracket grabs/Miner brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. Front Range’s deep fishbelly sidesill was modified to NJI&I’s more conventional pattern. Decals are from K4, which offers an amazing variety of secondary road choices. No weathering – once in a while we need a fresh car. Interestingly, the prototype lettering is “wrong side”. (Anyone know why?)    

 

For those not already NJI&I modelers (!) – the New Jersey, Indiana & Illinois was a short line created by Singer Sewing Machine to connect its South Bend plant to the Wabash 11 miles south; the roadname comes from the three states hosting Singer plants. Acquired by Wabash in 1926, it was operated as a separate subsidiary. Completing these undecs has added the fun of modeling prototypes that I would never have dreamed of pulling off the shelf at the LHS.  

 

Regards,

Bob Chapman


NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Bob Chapman
 

Circa 1990, Front Range offered styrene kits for variations of postwar AAR boxcars with R-3-4 improved dreadnaught ends and diagonal panel roofs, a cache of which I unburied in my pandemic project to drain the stash of long-slumbering styrene kits. One of the variations is a 12-panel welded car with 8-foot doors – a prototype fielded by Wabash subsidiary NJI&I, which acquired two 50-car series in 1/50.   

The Front Range carbody is nicely executed, but with add-on parts well below contemporary standards. New parts include a Yarmouth Models US Gypsum runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders/bracket grabs/Miner brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. Front Range’s deep fishbelly sidesill was modified to NJI&I’s more conventional pattern. Decals are from K4, which offers an amazing variety of secondary road choices. No weathering – once in a while we need a fresh car. Interestingly, the prototype lettering is “wrong side”. (Anyone know why?)    

For those not already NJI&I modelers (!) – the New Jersey, Indiana & Illinois was a short line created by Singer Sewing Machine to connect its South Bend plant to the Wabash 11 miles south; the roadname comes from the three states hosting Singer plants. Acquired by Wabash in 1926, it was operated as a separate subsidiary. Completing these undecs has added the fun of modeling prototypes that I would never have dreamed of pulling off the shelf at the LHS.  

Regards,
Bob Chapman


Re: Buster Keaton again

Bob Chaparro
 

Very likely these are Santa Fe livestock cars from their earlier classes, possibly Classes Sk-K, -L-, N or -P. Such cars appear on Page 71 of the book, Stock Cars of the Santa Fe Railway and a roof drawings appear on Pages 76 and 80.

A wreck photo showing the roof details of ATSF 56161 (Class Sk-K), a single deck car built in 1907:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/wreck/atsf56161main.html

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

A 1921 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/outdooradvertising/XXX0660

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Norfolk Southern & Seaboard Gondolas

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Norfolk Southern & Seaboard Gondolas

A 1926 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19260401EC0083

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Southern Gondolas 119079, 316116 & 119156

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Southern Gondolas 119079, 316116 & 119156

1929 and 1930 photos from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19300503WC0344

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19290503WC0194

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19290301WC0174

Scroll on the photos to enlarge them.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photos: Norfolk Southern Boxcar 20178

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: Norfolk Southern Boxcar 20178

Two 1926 photos from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19260615EC0123

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19260615EC0130

Scroll on the photos to enlarge them.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15337

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15337

A 1926 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19260301EC0066

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: D&H Gondola 37595

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: D&H Gondola 37595

A 1926 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19260601EC0118

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Clinchfield Boxcar 8153

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Clinchfield Boxcar 8153

A 1930 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19300503WC0346

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Rock Island Boxcar With A Load Of Radios

Bob Chaparro
 

Why Radio Was "Special" In The Early 20th Century

I've seen several photos of boxcars with banners proclaiming their load of radios. The reason was radio was something new and special in the early 20th Century.

In 1919, Frank Conrad, a Westinghouse engineer, began broadcasting music in Pittsburgh. These broadcasts stimulated the sales of crystal sets. The popularity of Conrad’s broadcasts led to Westinghouse establishing a radio station, KDKA, in 1920. In 1921, KDKA began broadcasting prizefights and major league baseball.

Westinghouse broadcast news and entertainment programs to entice people to purchase the radios they manufactured. And many manufacturers profited from selling an item that combined entertainment with furniture.

There were five licensed radio stations in 1921. By 1930 there were 618.

Annual sales of radios were $60 million in 1922. By 1929 they were $843 million.

Going from almost nothing in 1920, by 1934 sixty percent of the nation’s households had radios.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: NYC Boxcar 227130 & Buster Keaton

G.J. Irwin
 

This is great!  Researching history can be fascinating. 

And incidentally, one of the overhead shots in the full blog post shows a neat switching puzzle for, of course, Steam Era Freight Cars.

Thanks for this and all the other posts, Bob. 

Cheers,
George Irwin


Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 35

pennsylvania1954
 

Pro Custom Hobbies http://www.procustomhobbies.com is taking reservations now for $65.
--
Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 35

Paul Krueger
 

Here is some more information from a bookseller who sells through Facebook and train shows.

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA

=======

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 35 – the 1937 AAR Box Car
by Silverlake Images
 
A brand new Railway Prototype Cyclopedia is being produced by Silverlake Images. Modelers and historians have long appreciated the definitive information provided in this series. RPC Vol. 35 – the 1937 AAR Box Car will be a 385 page work which will included photos, text, rosters and drawings of this basic building block of box car history. The work itself will have the appearance and standards of the previous 34 volumes. It will be traditionally press printed and of a quantity to meet and exceed initial demand. Delivery is expected during the fall season, well in time for holiday gift consideration. The book is currently in the final review and is expected to go to the printer in very early August.



Re: HO Red Caboose Post-War Welded Tank Car-Improved

pennsylvania1954
 

Hi Nelson--Thank you. Except for lower areas as mentioned, the model generally has the out of the box finish that Red Caboose provided. Added styrene and metal parts were hand painted with Scalecoat Engine Black.
--
Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: HO Red Caboose Post-War Welded Tank Car-Improved

Paul Doggett
 

Steve 

That’s looks really nice.
Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 23 Jul 2020, at 12:51, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:



Beautiful model, Steve. Please tell us how you painted and finished it to capture the appearance of the prototype semi-gloss finish.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of pennsylvania1954
Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2020 11:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] HO Red Caboose Post-War Welded Tank Car-Improved

 

A few months ago I received this Red Caboose 10000 gal AC&F car as a kit lettered for UTLX. I had seen some unfavorable comments previously so I asked what improvements were needed. A very helpful list member forwarded Mont Switzer's excellent article from the Sept 1995 Mainline Modeler. After studying Mont's article and prototype photos, I decided that there was more that could be done. I have included the official AC&F photo which was most helpful. The most prominent issues I saw were the location and shape of the handrail. Red Caboose saw fit to locate the handrail at the midline of the tank. I thought it should be a bit higher. This was particularly noticeable on this UTLX version with the reporting marks visibly incorrect above the handrail. The brackets cast as part of the tank were easily removed, and new brackets, Detail Associates eyebolts, located and installed. I found the square corners of the original handrail objectionable so I fashioned a new one from brass wire. The photo shows weathering only partially done with grime airbrushed on the lower part of the car. The trucks are Exactrail Barber S2.

 

The UTLX number Red Caboose chose was 85339. Checking in my Jan 1955 ORER, I found series 80000 – 85999 for 100000 lb TL cars but only one car in the series. Must have been 85339. Seems a bit odd but I am sticking to it.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


<image001.jpg>
<image002.jpg>


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235, 000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Dang, Claus, I deleted them!

 

Suffice it to say, they paralleled your points.  The trucks look foreign, not of American manufacture.  They are very heavy, something American RRs had yet to replicate.  The era of large Heavy-Duty flat cars, experimental hoppers, was yet to come, even as industry pushed them harder and harder.

 

The story of the PRR F28 and F29 is illustrative of this shoving match, but on the horizon.  This is WAY earlier.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 10:12 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235, 000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Hi Elden,

 

Any chance you could forward to me one or more of the emails in that discussion? I'd love to read thru them

 

Claus

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2020 12:38 PM

Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235, 000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Claus;

 

We were holding a side discussion on this, and absolutely believe trucks were taken as war booty for use in the U.S. post-WW1.

 

Cheap way of obtaining HD trucks!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 5:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235, 000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Hi List Members,

 

I'll add that the trucks look identical to the ones on this car (see attached image). This is a move of a gun on the PRR thru Altoona PA in Dec 1918. (Note that a lower resolution copy of this same image is also available online at BlockedBlockedhttps://digital.hagley.org/PRR_ME04655 )

 

Also, there is a second image of a car, identical to Bethlehem Steel 900, this time with LV reporting marks available online at BlockedBlockedhttps://digital.hagley.org/PRR_ME04356 . It is - somewhat surprisingly - in the Hagley PRR Photo Archive and it has a PRR photo archive number ME4356 inscribed upon the negative! There is no question in my mind that  the LV car is the same car as Bethlehem 900.

 

I'm starting to conclude that these trucks were moved and rebuilt/repurposed/resold at least a few times in their lifetime.

 

Claus Schlund

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 5:01 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Hi Bob, Bruce and List Members,

 

The image Bruce attached, of Bethlehem 900, sure looks a whole lot like this PRR car at the link below...

 

 

And the trucks in the images Bob posted sure look to be a match as well.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Bruce Smith

Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 5:33 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Fascinating. These trucks are identical to those under Bethlehem Steel 900 in the attached photo. 

 

The PRR flat car(s) carrying "Big Bertha" to the Columbian Exposition were PRR class FG, 5116a, 5116b, 5117a, and 5117b. Class FG could be assembled as either a single car with 4 trucks, 2 span bolsters, and a bridge, or two cars consisting a two trucks and a bridge each. 

 

Clearly, the photo posted by Bob uses the load as the carbody, which was not at all unusual. You can see the pivot points on each car under the load. 

 

Ed - My interpretation of the numbering of the trucks is that the TWO in the photo Bob posted are the trucks for PRR 425483. The bridge has been replaced by the load. There are another two trucks and car body/bridge that would make up 425484

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 2:57 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

I suspected that it was a PRR car….funny that it doesn’t have any reporting marks other than the number, at least that I noticed on the photo.

This may be the “car” used to haul the Krupp Gun barrel to the 1893 Columbian Exposition.  I don’t think I retained any pictures of that car but the European-style “trucks” look familiar.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of spsalso via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 2:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

The drawbar is that big thing on top with all the writing on it.

A question might be whether the whole assembly (car and load) was ever mixing into a generic train, or was handled individually.  The second photo hints at the latter.  Maybe.

Too, a person might wonder how the subject car was returned empty.  Maybe that gon is carrying the "return drawbar".

The car is listed in my November 1926 ORER as PRR 425483 and 425484 (In the photos, it's 425483 A and B).  Capacity is listed as 150,000 pounds.  It's called a "Flat, Gun and Cable Steel".



Ed

Edward Sutorik









On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 11:37 AM, mel perry wrote:

no drawbar or coupler?

mel perry

 


Re: wheel weathering (was Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar)

Tim O'Connor
 


A fun experiment would be to put the wheelset in a drill chuck and get it rotating, and then drop a tiny
drop of thin paint exactly in the center - just to see if it replicates this look. :-)


On 7/23/2020 9:18 AM, Matt Goodman via groups.io wrote:
Agreed on the “no rusty wheels”. I’ve been working on prototypically modeling/weathering wheel faces for solid bearing trucks recently. Every time I think I have an accurate and easily reproducible method, I find another well-lit photo illustrating some new oil pattern. In this case, it was the radial streaking - different than the more common “soft” circumferential wicking from the hub outward and tire inward. 

This wheel face is relatively clean - maybe there simply hasn’t been enough dirt/dust yet collected to absorb and distribute the oil more evenly. In any case, another well-lit reference. 



Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235, 000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Elden,
 
Any chance you could forward to me one or more of the emails in that discussion? I'd love to read thru them
 
Claus
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2020 12:38 PM
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235, 000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

Claus;

 

We were holding a side discussion on this, and absolutely believe trucks were taken as war booty for use in the U.S. post-WW1.

 

Cheap way of obtaining HD trucks!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 5:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235, 000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Hi List Members,

 

I'll add that the trucks look identical to the ones on this car (see attached image). This is a move of a gun on the PRR thru Altoona PA in Dec 1918. (Note that a lower resolution copy of this same image is also available online at Blockedhttps://digital.hagley.org/PRR_ME04655 )

 

Also, there is a second image of a car, identical to Bethlehem Steel 900, this time with LV reporting marks available online at Blockedhttps://digital.hagley.org/PRR_ME04356 . It is - somewhat surprisingly - in the Hagley PRR Photo Archive and it has a PRR photo archive number ME4356 inscribed upon the negative! There is no question in my mind that  the LV car is the same car as Bethlehem 900.

 

I'm starting to conclude that these trucks were moved and rebuilt/repurposed/resold at least a few times in their lifetime.

 

Claus Schlund

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 5:01 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Hi Bob, Bruce and List Members,

 

The image Bruce attached, of Bethlehem 900, sure looks a whole lot like this PRR car at the link below...

 

 

And the trucks in the images Bob posted sure look to be a match as well.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Bruce Smith

Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 5:33 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

Fascinating. These trucks are identical to those under Bethlehem Steel 900 in the attached photo. 

 

The PRR flat car(s) carrying "Big Bertha" to the Columbian Exposition were PRR class FG, 5116a, 5116b, 5117a, and 5117b. Class FG could be assembled as either a single car with 4 trucks, 2 span bolsters, and a bridge, or two cars consisting a two trucks and a bridge each. 

 

Clearly, the photo posted by Bob uses the load as the carbody, which was not at all unusual. You can see the pivot points on each car under the load. 

 

Ed - My interpretation of the numbering of the trucks is that the TWO in the photo Bob posted are the trucks for PRR 425483. The bridge has been replaced by the load. There are another two trucks and car body/bridge that would make up 425484

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 2:57 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

I suspected that it was a PRR car….funny that it doesn’t have any reporting marks other than the number, at least that I noticed on the photo.

This may be the “car” used to haul the Krupp Gun barrel to the 1893 Columbian Exposition.  I don’t think I retained any pictures of that car but the European-style “trucks” look familiar.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of spsalso via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 2:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 235,000 Pound Casting, Very Short Flat Cars

 

The drawbar is that big thing on top with all the writing on it.

A question might be whether the whole assembly (car and load) was ever mixing into a generic train, or was handled individually.  The second photo hints at the latter.  Maybe.

Too, a person might wonder how the subject car was returned empty.  Maybe that gon is carrying the "return drawbar".

The car is listed in my November 1926 ORER as PRR 425483 and 425484 (In the photos, it's 425483 A and B).  Capacity is listed as 150,000 pounds.  It's called a "Flat, Gun and Cable Steel".



Ed

Edward Sutorik









On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 11:37 AM, mel perry wrote:

no drawbar or coupler?

mel perry

 

10081 - 10100 of 186156