Date   

Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Steve SANDIFER
 

A railroad wheel is solid, but with a slight slope so that the outside of the wheel is smaller in circumference than the inside by the flange. A tight corner like this pulls the wheel to the outside of the curve and could cause the outside wheel flange to climb the rail. The guard rail on the inside rail of the curve keeps the wheel from going too far out and derailing.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 8:29 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

 

Hi List Members,

 

Sometimes when I am looking at images of steam era freight cars on sharp curves, I will see that the inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail.

 

One example can be seen in the image linked below, both track sections have the guard rail applied against the inside running rail of the curve...

 

 

Another example can be seen at the link below...

 

 

Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.

 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

mopacfirst
 

I've seen that in other places.  It was probably more common in this era just because there were more industry tracks with very sharp curves.

It stands to reason that the back of the wheel flange would contact this rail, if the truck were to start to fail to follow the curve.  This is probably a more effective restraint than the opposite wheel on the opposite rail, which is of course also a restraining lateral force in the same direction as this guardrail is exerting, while the truck is rotating with respect to the body of the car.

Ron Merrick


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Tony Thompson
 

Claus Schlund wrote:

Anoth example can be seen at the link below...
 
 
Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.

     This sharp curve into the oil dealer facility looks like something model railroaders would do <grin> -- though most would omit the guard rail.

Tony Thompson




inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Sometimes when I am looking at images of steam era freight cars on sharp curves, I will see that the inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail.
 
One example can be seen in the image linked below, both track sections have the guard rail applied against the inside running rail of the curve...
 
 
Anoth example can be seen at the link below...
 
 
Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.
 
Thanks in advance for your thoughts
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 


Re: the freight car on the LEFT side of this image

Richard Townsend
 

Speculation: some kind of circus car?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jul 23, 2020 6:11 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] the freight car on the LEFT side of this image

Hi List Members,
 
Can anyone say what the freight car on the LEFT side of this image is? It appears to carry the reporting marks ARC 5
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


the freight car on the LEFT side of this image

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Can anyone say what the freight car on the LEFT side of this image is? It appears to carry the reporting marks ARC 5
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Chet
 

Very nice car Bob.  I have always like these cars  and figured if I wanted to build one I would use a Branchline 8' door car and sand off the rivets and
replace them with weld seams.  Probably would use panel lines.  Now I need to look at the bottom of the pile and see if I have a few Front Range cars.
The K4 decals also look nice.  The WABASH was put on the wrong side of the car so that it would always be seen and not partly covered by an
open door.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Intermountain underframes

mopacfirst
 

I picked up a few of the recent Intermountain 1937 and 1942 40' boxcar recently to round out the fleet.  I had built quite a few of the early ones, and I recalled the change in the underframe of the 1942 (10"-6") which had a very thick body bolster so that it (the center of the bolster surrounding the part molded into the body), was now flush with the part molded into the body.  In other words, there was no projection into the truck mounting hole.  This also put the body 4 to 6 inches too high.  At that time, I would cut that part back when I was working on the underframe.  I used various methods, but finally discovered that just filing it flat would still allow the trucks to swivel properly, so I didn't bother to try to fill in the space between the underframe body bolster part and the part molded into the body, which takes the truck screw.

Now I find, on these RTR cars, that the same problematic underframe part is used on both.  I just tore into a couple of the 10'-0" 1937 cars and discovered that this underframe, with the too-thick bolster, is now used on these cars too.  I routinely bust off the coupler pocket on Intermountain cars so that I can install the Kadee 262 coupler pocket and discovered this.  Fortunately (?), the paint on this underframe part is about two scale inches thick, so I was able to chisel it off which reduced the height a little, but I'm really disgusted to discover this.

Ron Merrick


we were discussing cotton bales

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Many months back, perhaps a year back, we were discussing cotton bales.
 
A nice image of one can be seen at the link below...
 
 
Conveniently, it also has two steam era freight cars close by in the photo.
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Buster Keaton again

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

   The CN 1 ½ door box car like I make with the Accu-rail cars and my own NERS ½ door

Add-On kits isn’t bad either. Excuse the shameless plug. Wish I could enlarge and print

that photo. Neat style of stock car with wider running boards and feed hatches.

 

My best, Don Valentine

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

Matt Goodman
 

Duke’s advertising collection is quite good. My town of residence is pretty well covered, though unfortunately, there aren’t a lot of close-up freight car photos like this one. 

Regardless, they are great for contextual details (cars, trolleys, roads, buildings and people) given that the billboard owners were trying to show how busy the location is. Lots of eyeballs!

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Jul 23, 2020, at 3:02 PM, Gary Ray <gerber1926@...> wrote:



Hi Bob,

I really appreciate all the photo links you are sharing from the 20’s.  I will copy the billboard image from this link.  Also will investigate Duke’s billboard site more.

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 8:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

 

Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

A 1921 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/outdooradvertising/XXX0660

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Tony Thompson
 

      Very nice-looking model, Bob, and quite an advance on what Front Range originally provided!

Tony Thompson




Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Paul Doggett
 

Very nicely Done Bob 


Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 23 Jul 2020, at 18:09, Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:


Circa 1990, Front Range offered styrene kits for variations of postwar AAR boxcars with R-3-4 improved dreadnaught ends and diagonal panel roofs, a cache of which I unburied in my pandemic project to drain the stash of long-slumbering styrene kits. One of the variations is a 12-panel welded car with 8-foot doors – a prototype fielded by Wabash subsidiary NJI&I, which acquired two 50-car series in 1/50.   

The Front Range carbody is nicely executed, but with add-on parts well below contemporary standards. New parts include a Yarmouth Models US Gypsum runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders/bracket grabs/Miner brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. Front Range’s deep fishbelly sidesill was modified to NJI&I’s more conventional pattern. Decals are from K4, which offers an amazing variety of secondary road choices. No weathering – once in a while we need a fresh car. Interestingly, the prototype lettering is “wrong side”. (Anyone know why?)    

For those not already NJI&I modelers (!) – the New Jersey, Indiana & Illinois was a short line created by Singer Sewing Machine to connect its South Bend plant to the Wabash 11 miles south; the roadname comes from the three states hosting Singer plants. Acquired by Wabash in 1926, it was operated as a separate subsidiary. Completing these undecs has added the fun of modeling prototypes that I would never have dreamed of pulling off the shelf at the LHS.  

Regards,
Bob Chapman

Attachments:


Re: Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

Gary Ray
 

Hi Bob,

I really appreciate all the photo links you are sharing from the 20’s.  I will copy the billboard image from this link.  Also will investigate Duke’s billboard site more.

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 8:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

 

Photo: Assorted Boxcars (NYC, MC, PRR & Wabash)

A 1921 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/outdooradvertising/XXX0660

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15397 (was 15337)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


My typo error, I meant 15397! Sorry!
 
CLaus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15397 (was 15337)

Hi Bob and List Members,
 
Upon inspection of the end reporting marks, I think this car number is actually 13397, not 15337
 
Thanks for the great images Bob!
 
Claus Schlund
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 11:30 AM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15337

Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15337

A 1926 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19260301EC0066

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15397 (was 15337)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
Upon inspection of the end reporting marks, I think this car number is actually 13397, not 15337
 
Thanks for the great images Bob!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 11:30 AM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15337

Photo: NC&St.L Boxcar 15337

A 1926 photo from the Duke University Archives:

https://repository.duke.edu/dc/dukeconstruction/19260301EC0066

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Rock Island Boxcar With A Load Of Radios

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Why Radio Was "Special" In The Early 20th Century
I've seen several photos of boxcars with banners proclaiming their load of radios. The reason was radio was something new and special in the early 20th Century.
In 1919, Frank Conrad, a Westinghouse engineer, began broadcasting music in Pittsburgh. These broadcasts stimulated the sales of crystal sets. The popularity of Conrad’s broadcasts led to Westinghouse establishing a radio station, KDKA, in 1920.

      KDKA still exists (or did until quite recently), and was "grandfathered" in the general pattern of Western station call letters beginning with "K" and Eastern ones with "W".

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Livestock Cars With Roof Hatches

Bob Chaparro
 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Nice car, Bob!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chapman
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 12:38 PM
To: STMFC E-List <main@Realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

 

Circa 1990, Front Range offered styrene kits for variations of postwar AAR boxcars with R-3-4 improved dreadnaught ends and diagonal panel roofs, a cache of which I unburied in my pandemic project to drain the stash of long-slumbering styrene kits. One of the variations is a 12-panel welded car with 8-foot doors – a prototype fielded by Wabash subsidiary NJI&I, which acquired two 50-car series in 1/50.   

 

The Front Range carbody is nicely executed, but with add-on parts well below contemporary standards. New parts include a Yarmouth Models US Gypsum runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders/bracket grabs/Miner brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. Front Range’s deep fishbelly sidesill was modified to NJI&I’s more conventional pattern. Decals are from K4, which offers an amazing variety of secondary road choices. No weathering – once in a while we need a fresh car. Interestingly, the prototype lettering is “wrong side”. (Anyone know why?)    

 

For those not already NJI&I modelers (!) – the New Jersey, Indiana & Illinois was a short line created by Singer Sewing Machine to connect its South Bend plant to the Wabash 11 miles south; the roadname comes from the three states hosting Singer plants. Acquired by Wabash in 1926, it was operated as a separate subsidiary. Completing these undecs has added the fun of modeling prototypes that I would never have dreamed of pulling off the shelf at the LHS.  

 

Regards,

Bob Chapman


NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Bob Chapman
 

Circa 1990, Front Range offered styrene kits for variations of postwar AAR boxcars with R-3-4 improved dreadnaught ends and diagonal panel roofs, a cache of which I unburied in my pandemic project to drain the stash of long-slumbering styrene kits. One of the variations is a 12-panel welded car with 8-foot doors – a prototype fielded by Wabash subsidiary NJI&I, which acquired two 50-car series in 1/50.   

The Front Range carbody is nicely executed, but with add-on parts well below contemporary standards. New parts include a Yarmouth Models US Gypsum runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders/bracket grabs/Miner brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. Front Range’s deep fishbelly sidesill was modified to NJI&I’s more conventional pattern. Decals are from K4, which offers an amazing variety of secondary road choices. No weathering – once in a while we need a fresh car. Interestingly, the prototype lettering is “wrong side”. (Anyone know why?)    

For those not already NJI&I modelers (!) – the New Jersey, Indiana & Illinois was a short line created by Singer Sewing Machine to connect its South Bend plant to the Wabash 11 miles south; the roadname comes from the three states hosting Singer plants. Acquired by Wabash in 1926, it was operated as a separate subsidiary. Completing these undecs has added the fun of modeling prototypes that I would never have dreamed of pulling off the shelf at the LHS.  

Regards,
Bob Chapman

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