Date   

Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Tim O'Connor
 

Bob

That is gorgeous. I've always admired the tooling of the Front Range dreadnaught ends - he must have
pantographed the real thing to do them that well. The bodies dress up nicely. I fill in the pre-drilled holes
with styrene rod.




On 7/23/2020 12:37 PM, Robert Chapman wrote:
Circa 1990, Front Range offered styrene kits for variations of postwar AAR boxcars with R-3-4 improved dreadnaught ends and diagonal panel roofs, a cache of which I unburied in my pandemic project to drain the stash of long-slumbering styrene kits. One of the variations is a 12-panel welded car with 8-foot doors – a prototype fielded by Wabash subsidiary NJI&I, which acquired two 50-car series in 1/50.   

The Front Range carbody is nicely executed, but with add-on parts well below contemporary standards. New parts include a Yarmouth Models US Gypsum runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders/bracket grabs/Miner brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. Front Range’s deep fishbelly sidesill was modified to NJI&I’s more conventional pattern. Decals are from K4, which offers an amazing variety of secondary road choices. No weathering – once in a while we need a fresh car. Interestingly, the prototype lettering is “wrong side”. (Anyone know why?)    

For those not already NJI&I modelers (!) – the New Jersey, Indiana & Illinois was a short line created by Singer Sewing Machine to connect its South Bend plant to the Wabash 11 miles south; the roadname comes from the three states hosting Singer plants. Acquired by Wabash in 1926, it was operated as a separate subsidiary. Completing these undecs has added the fun of modeling prototypes that I would never have dreamed of pulling off the shelf at the LHS.  

Regards,
Bob Chapman

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Cotton bales

Paul Doggett
 

Oh I am sure you have .
Paul 


On 24 Jul 2020, at 15:56, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:


I doubt that !!!

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 10:50 AM Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Fenton 

I hope you have more patience than me.

Paul Doggett 


On 24 Jul 2020, at 15:45, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:


I'm going to have to figure out how to make those as my area of the US did lots of cotton.
Fenton

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 10:42 AM Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
There used to be a guy in England who produced decent cotton bales unfortunately he passed away in middle age .
Paul Doggett     England. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿





--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Cotton bales

O Fenton Wells
 

I doubt that !!!


On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 10:50 AM Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Fenton 

I hope you have more patience than me.

Paul Doggett 


On 24 Jul 2020, at 15:45, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:


I'm going to have to figure out how to make those as my area of the US did lots of cotton.
Fenton

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 10:42 AM Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
There used to be a guy in England who produced decent cotton bales unfortunately he passed away in middle age .
Paul Doggett     England. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿





--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Cotton bales

Paul Doggett
 

Fenton 

I hope you have more patience than me.

Paul Doggett 


On 24 Jul 2020, at 15:45, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:


I'm going to have to figure out how to make those as my area of the US did lots of cotton.
Fenton

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 10:42 AM Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
There used to be a guy in England who produced decent cotton bales unfortunately he passed away in middle age .
Paul Doggett     England. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿





--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Cotton bales

O Fenton Wells
 

I'm going to have to figure out how to make those as my area of the US did lots of cotton.
Fenton

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 10:42 AM Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
There used to be a guy in England who produced decent cotton bales unfortunately he passed away in middle age .
Paul Doggett     England. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿





--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Cotton bales

Paul Doggett
 

There used to be a guy in England who produced decent cotton bales unfortunately he passed away in middle age .
Paul Doggett England. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

I believe from the photos they are "self guarding frogs", the guard rails are built into the frogs , not needing a separate guard rails.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353

On Thursday, July 23, 2020, 11:02:14 PM CDT, Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek <jvgbvg@...> wrote:


I’ not so sure.  Look at the trackage at The Harlem Transfer Company:

 

http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/ht.html#:~:text=The%20Harlem%20Transfer%20Company%20was%20located%20at%20Park,other%20railroads%20would%20jointly%20operate%20in%20the%20facility.

 

The majority of the curves, and the curved-frog turnouts, had 90-foot and 104-foot radii, but no guard rails on the inside rail.  There may be other reasons why the HTC could get away with such absurd track radii without guard rails.

 

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, Ca

 

 


Gondola details

Eric Hansmann
 

Bill Welch shares a few gondola upgrade tips in the latest Resin Car Works blog post.

Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Intermountain underframes

John Sykes III
 

I think this is another case of Intermountain quality going to hell in a handbasket.

It seems to me that the key factor was the closing of the Hong Kong factory a year or so ago.

I just got 6 PFE reefers about a month ago and am finding that the brake gear mountings are different on some of them (inconsistent).  Looks like they came out of multiple factories.   However they are all wrong and need the brake gear removed and reapplied correctly.  I bought 6 CalScale* brake sets just in case I needed to replace parts, but am finding that the Intermountain brake gear comes off very easily since it is poorly secured to the underframe.  I would rather have a "shake the box" kit where I can properly buildup the brake gear than have to remove and rebuild it.

*Yeah, I know, Tichy is closer to scale, but I have always found it to be a PITA to install.

-- John


Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

al_brown03
 

Nice car!

Al Brown,Melbourne, Fla.


Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

ron christensen
 

I took this photo at Rantoul, IL.  1969
Ron Christensen


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek
 

I’ not so sure.  Look at the trackage at The Harlem Transfer Company:

 

http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/ht.html#:~:text=The%20Harlem%20Transfer%20Company%20was%20located%20at%20Park,other%20railroads%20would%20jointly%20operate%20in%20the%20facility.

 

The majority of the curves, and the curved-frog turnouts, had 90-foot and 104-foot radii, but no guard rails on the inside rail.  There may be other reasons why the HTC could get away with such absurd track radii without guard rails.

 

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, Ca

 

 


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Matt Goodman
 

A bit more information from a Railway Maintenance And Maintenance Cyclopedia (1929) is attached. There’s a couple more pages of detail, if you’re interested in various rules, practices and vendors of curve guard rails.  In short, what Ron and James said. 



Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Jul 23, 2020, at 10:16 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Thanks Ron and James, now I understand!
 
Claus Schlund
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 9:52 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

A railroad wheel is solid, but with a slight slope so that the outside of the wheel is smaller in circumference than the inside by the flange. A tight corner like this pulls the wheel to the outside of the curve and could cause the outside wheel flange to climb the rail. The guard rail on the inside rail of the curve keeps the wheel from going too far out and derailing.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 8:29 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

 

Hi List Members,

 

Sometimes when I am looking at images of steam era freight cars on sharp curves, I will see that the inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail.

 

One example can be seen in the image linked below, both track sections have the guard rail applied against the inside running rail of the curve...

 

 

Another example can be seen at the link below...

 

 

Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.

 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Thanks Ron and James, now I understand!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 9:52 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

A railroad wheel is solid, but with a slight slope so that the outside of the wheel is smaller in circumference than the inside by the flange. A tight corner like this pulls the wheel to the outside of the curve and could cause the outside wheel flange to climb the rail. The guard rail on the inside rail of the curve keeps the wheel from going too far out and derailing.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 8:29 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

 

Hi List Members,

 

Sometimes when I am looking at images of steam era freight cars on sharp curves, I will see that the inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail.

 

One example can be seen in the image linked below, both track sections have the guard rail applied against the inside running rail of the curve...

 

 

Another example can be seen at the link below...

 

 

Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.

 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Steve SANDIFER
 

A railroad wheel is solid, but with a slight slope so that the outside of the wheel is smaller in circumference than the inside by the flange. A tight corner like this pulls the wheel to the outside of the curve and could cause the outside wheel flange to climb the rail. The guard rail on the inside rail of the curve keeps the wheel from going too far out and derailing.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 8:29 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

 

Hi List Members,

 

Sometimes when I am looking at images of steam era freight cars on sharp curves, I will see that the inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail.

 

One example can be seen in the image linked below, both track sections have the guard rail applied against the inside running rail of the curve...

 

 

Another example can be seen at the link below...

 

 

Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.

 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

mopacfirst
 

I've seen that in other places.  It was probably more common in this era just because there were more industry tracks with very sharp curves.

It stands to reason that the back of the wheel flange would contact this rail, if the truck were to start to fail to follow the curve.  This is probably a more effective restraint than the opposite wheel on the opposite rail, which is of course also a restraining lateral force in the same direction as this guardrail is exerting, while the truck is rotating with respect to the body of the car.

Ron Merrick


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Tony Thompson
 

Claus Schlund wrote:

Anoth example can be seen at the link below...
 
 
Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.

     This sharp curve into the oil dealer facility looks like something model railroaders would do <grin> -- though most would omit the guard rail.

Tony Thompson




inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Sometimes when I am looking at images of steam era freight cars on sharp curves, I will see that the inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail.
 
One example can be seen in the image linked below, both track sections have the guard rail applied against the inside running rail of the curve...
 
 
Anoth example can be seen at the link below...
 
 
Can anyone tell me why this is done? I'm going to guess it helps keep the cars on the rails while traversing the curve, but right off the bat, I don't see how that would work.
 
Thanks in advance for your thoughts
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 


Re: the freight car on the LEFT side of this image

Richard Townsend
 

Speculation: some kind of circus car?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jul 23, 2020 6:11 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] the freight car on the LEFT side of this image

Hi List Members,
 
Can anyone say what the freight car on the LEFT side of this image is? It appears to carry the reporting marks ARC 5
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


the freight car on the LEFT side of this image

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Can anyone say what the freight car on the LEFT side of this image is? It appears to carry the reporting marks ARC 5
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

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