Date   

D&H Gondola

Andy Carlson
 

I sure hope my sources don't dry up because this is fun!
Again, no thanks are necessary.
-Andy Carlson  Ojai CAInline image


CN gondola

Andy Carlson
 

More in my ever increasing efforts to supply the list with content. enjoy!

-Andy Carlson    Ojai CAInline image


Re: Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Most of them contain such a date in the link, or the subject line, and is, agreed, one of the gates I use to decide whether I want to look at it or not.

 

Keep posting.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Parker via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 6:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant

 

I'm inclined to agree with Richard, but would suggest that the posters of these many photos try and include a date in the subject line, even if approximate.  In conjunction with a road name, this can help a lot with deciding whether or not I need to take a peek, or can skip it and move on.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


B&O 17000

Andy Carlson
 

Allow me to join onto this upcoming trend. B&O #17000. A mostly steel box car. Please, no need to thank me, I do it for love.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

Inline image


Re: Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant

Dave Parker
 

I'm inclined to agree with Richard, but would suggest that the posters of these many photos try and include a date in the subject line, even if approximate.  In conjunction with a road name, this can help a lot with deciding whether or not I need to take a peek, or can skip it and move on.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: photo links (was Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant)

Schuyler Larrabee
 

There is a key on every computer keyboard that says “Delete.”

 

If you don’t like the listings of freight car images from the many troves of images that have been brought to us, I suggest you make use of that key.

 

Your loss.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schleigh Mike via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:51 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] photo links (was Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant)

 

Tim,

 

I am a bit surprised by this reaction.  It has never occurred to me that I was being made aware of online collections, but rather, freight cars.  Remember, those things that are in our group's title.  I for one am not interested in searching endlessly for images and I very much appreciate that someone else finds gems and posts them for me (all of us) to consider.  As for even pointing out what might draw our attention, that is not necessary.  There have been many serendipitous encounters for details, such as other freight cars in the background, that no one could guess my interest in having.  I have many photos now filed away that may be of future interest thanks to these being routinely posted.  I don't have time to search for or through archives so I find these postings often quite interesting and helpful.  Some generate sound and useful discussion, thank you!  I would miss them if they did not happen.  If they are of no interest, they are easily passed over.

 

I say, "Keep posting Freight Car images."

 

Mike Schleigh in summery Grove City, Penna.

 

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 05:00:20 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

 

 


I agree with George. It's GREAT to be made aware of online archival collections (Thank You!) but after
that, I think we're all capable of finding pictures we're interested in, on our own. Some of the web sites are
indeed wonderful.

Or start a BLOG somewhere that covers the era of interest (1920's 1940's whatever), and put the links
in there.

Unless the idea is to start a discussion - then at least tell us WHY our attention is being drawn to a photo
that any of us could find if we were looking around.



On 7/24/2020 4:41 PM, George Eichelberger wrote:

Might I suggest that RealSTMFC does not need to morph into a directory of photos on the Internet?
 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant

Richard Townsend
 

I suggest to those who don't want to look at these photos don't look at them. I have skipped over some when I have been busy, but I have enjoyed many of them. I say keep them coming.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Jul 24, 2020 1:41 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant

Might I suggest that RealSTMFC does not need to morph into a directory of photos on the Internet?


Re: Reboxx Reboot

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

Encouraging, with May 2020 blog entries, but nothing else on the site is live. For example, there is a section on wheel sets saying to buy them on line, but there are no links to allow you to do that. My guess is that, if it is legit, it is still in the process of being built. 

     I noticed the same. I was ready to buy some stuff!!

Tony Thompson




Re: photo links (was Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant)

Schleigh Mike
 

Tim,

I am a bit surprised by this reaction.  It has never occurred to me that I was being made aware of online collections, but rather, freight cars.  Remember, those things that are in our group's title.  I for one am not interested in searching endlessly for images and I very much appreciate that someone else finds gems and posts them for me (all of us) to consider.  As for even pointing out what might draw our attention, that is not necessary.  There have been many serendipitous encounters for details, such as other freight cars in the background, that no one could guess my interest in having.  I have many photos now filed away that may be of future interest thanks to these being routinely posted.  I don't have time to search for or through archives so I find these postings often quite interesting and helpful.  Some generate sound and useful discussion, thank you!  I would miss them if they did not happen.  If they are of no interest, they are easily passed over.

I say, "Keep posting Freight Car images."

Mike Schleigh in summery Grove City, Penna.

On Friday, July 24, 2020, 05:00:20 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



I agree with George. It's GREAT to be made aware of online archival collections (Thank You!) but after
that, I think we're all capable of finding pictures we're interested in, on our own. Some of the web sites are
indeed wonderful.

Or start a BLOG somewhere that covers the era of interest (1920's 1940's whatever), and put the links
in there.

Unless the idea is to start a discussion - then at least tell us WHY our attention is being drawn to a photo
that any of us could find if we were looking around.



On 7/24/2020 4:41 PM, George Eichelberger wrote:
Might I suggest that RealSTMFC does not need to morph into a directory of photos on the Internet?


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: photo links (was Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant)

Tim O'Connor
 


I agree with George. It's GREAT to be made aware of online archival collections (Thank You!) but after
that, I think we're all capable of finding pictures we're interested in, on our own. Some of the web sites are
indeed wonderful.

Or start a BLOG somewhere that covers the era of interest (1920's 1940's whatever), and put the links
in there.

Unless the idea is to start a discussion - then at least tell us WHY our attention is being drawn to a photo
that any of us could find if we were looking around.



On 7/24/2020 4:41 PM, George Eichelberger wrote:
Might I suggest that RealSTMFC does not need to morph into a directory of photos on the Internet?


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Tank Cars At National Zinc Separating Company Plant

George Eichelberger
 

Might I suggest that RealSTMFC does not need to morph into a directory of photos on the Internet?


Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Tim O'Connor
 


This would make a fun modeling project!


On 7/24/2020 3:20 PM, Chet wrote:
NJI&I 4233 was one of the fifty ex-Wabash 87000 series war emergency cars sold to the NJI&I in Nov.,1960.  Wabash's Decatur IL shop
added the eight panel steel sides to the cars and painted them in the large flag scheme introduced in late 1960.  Note the 5/5 dreadnaught ends.
Made a nice looking box car. 

Chet French
Dixon, IL 

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi everyone,
 
Thanks very much for all the great and thoroughly informative replies made on this topic
 
Now that I understand the issues, I have a spot on my model railroad where the application of such a guard rail would be thoroughly appropriate, and I'd like to do so. My question now becomes, has anyone done this, and if so, how did you attach the guard rail so it would stay put? I'm thinking that gluing it to the ties means gluing it to slippery engineering plastic, and most glues don't do a very good job with this. Furthermore, in my case, this work will be done on an NTRAK module that travels to shows as part of a modular layout, thus it is subject to constant twisting and flexing and heavy-handed rail cleaning by others, and I want the rail to be secure as can be.
 
Note that in my case, I will be retrofitting the guard rail onto an existing section of track, in case that was not already clear.
 
Suggestions?
 
Thanks in advance
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 3:04 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Dennis, as usual, shares interesting information. Enough so that I went back to the Cyc., which mentioned the repositioning of the low (inner) side guard rail relative to the high side running rail (the gauge between the guard and opposite rail being 4’ 6 3/4”). It goes on to say for sharper curves, a guard rail may be applied to the inside of the high side rail, with the same relative gauging. 

For the sharpest curves, a third guard rail may be applied to the inside of the low side rail - this one to support overhanging blind driver tires.

All of the pictured applications used lighter rail for the guard rail, with special chairs that both braced the guard rail and raised guard railhead's height to the the same plane as the running rail. They also allowed the base of the guard rail to overlap the base of the running rail - no shearing required in that case. One additional guard rail implementation called for the guard rail to be laid on it’s side to take advantage of increased section strength (deeper girder) and plenty of meat in the sideways railhead to accommodate wear. 

All of these descriptions had a caveat that all guard rail use was considered objectionable due to increased costs (material and maintenance), so should be used only in special cases.

Matt 

On Jul 24, 2020, at 2:15 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 09:02 PM, Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek wrote:
There may be other reasons why the HTC could get away with such absurd track radii without guard rails.
There was... the size of their motive power. Freight cars of this era were fine with those tight curves, and the Harlem Transfer used a boxcab diesel with trucks that were hardly any longer wheelbase. Even before the diesel the motive power was a tiny 0-4-0. But mainline railroads tended to use larger power for local switching; six couple and smaller eight couple power being common. These long rigid wheelbases had problems with tight curves. The first modification needed was to widen the gauge... as much as 1-1/2 or even two inches, and this has been done. How can I tell? The standard flangeway for guarded curves on 4'-8 1/8" gauge track is just under 2". This is so small that it is not obtainable with standard rail' the bases interfere with each other and the base of the guard rail needs to be sheared. However, when the gauge is widened the guard rail moves in tandem with the opposite running rail. The photos presented have the guard rail so far from the running rail that there is room for spikes in between.  The gauge has been widened at least 1-1/2" to accommodate steam locomotives.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Reboxx Reboot

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

Encouraging, with May 2020 blog entries, but nothing else on the site is live. For example, there is a section on wheel sets saying to buy them on line, but there are no links to allow you to do that. My guess is that, if it is legit, it is still in the process of being built. Hopefully, we will see the return of their great selection of axle lengths.

Regards,
Bruce 
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bill Welch <fgexbill@...>
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 2:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Reboxx Reboot
 
Not sure if this has been noted here, I saw it on Facebook: https://www.reboxx.com/Tools.htm

Bill Welch


Reboxx Reboot

Bill Welch
 

Not sure if this has been noted here, I saw it on Facebook: https://www.reboxx.com/Tools.htm

Bill Welch


Re: the freight car on the LEFT side of this image

Charlie Vlk
 

All-

Note that the car appears to be all-steel.  Likely not a circus car.  It looks like there are two sets of doors above the mid-height of the car between the 2nd and 3rd and 6th and 7th vertical structural members (framed by two horizontal members each) which might indicate top-loading for a commodity such as coke???

Charlie Vlk

_._,_._,_

 


Re: NJI&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #1

Chet
 

NJI&I 4233 was one of the fifty ex-Wabash 87000 series war emergency cars sold to the NJI&I in Nov.,1960.  Wabash's Decatur IL shop
added the eight panel steel sides to the cars and painted them in the large flag scheme introduced in late 1960.  Note the 5/5 dreadnaught ends.
Made a nice looking box car. 

Chet French
Dixon, IL 


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Matt Goodman
 

Dennis, as usual, shares interesting information. Enough so that I went back to the Cyc., which mentioned the repositioning of the low (inner) side guard rail relative to the high side running rail (the gauge between the guard and opposite rail being 4’ 6 3/4”). It goes on to say for sharper curves, a guard rail may be applied to the inside of the high side rail, with the same relative gauging. 

For the sharpest curves, a third guard rail may be applied to the inside of the low side rail - this one to support overhanging blind driver tires.

All of the pictured applications used lighter rail for the guard rail, with special chairs that both braced the guard rail and raised guard railhead's height to the the same plane as the running rail. They also allowed the base of the guard rail to overlap the base of the running rail - no shearing required in that case. One additional guard rail implementation called for the guard rail to be laid on it’s side to take advantage of increased section strength (deeper girder) and plenty of meat in the sideways railhead to accommodate wear. 

All of these descriptions had a caveat that all guard rail use was considered objectionable due to increased costs (material and maintenance), so should be used only in special cases.

Matt 

On Jul 24, 2020, at 2:15 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 09:02 PM, Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek wrote:
There may be other reasons why the HTC could get away with such absurd track radii without guard rails.
There was... the size of their motive power. Freight cars of this era were fine with those tight curves, and the Harlem Transfer used a boxcab diesel with trucks that were hardly any longer wheelbase. Even before the diesel the motive power was a tiny 0-4-0. But mainline railroads tended to use larger power for local switching; six couple and smaller eight couple power being common. These long rigid wheelbases had problems with tight curves. The first modification needed was to widen the gauge... as much as 1-1/2 or even two inches, and this has been done. How can I tell? The standard flangeway for guarded curves on 4'-8 1/8" gauge track is just under 2". This is so small that it is not obtainable with standard rail' the bases interfere with each other and the base of the guard rail needs to be sheared. However, when the gauge is widened the guard rail moves in tandem with the opposite running rail. The photos presented have the guard rail so far from the running rail that there is room for spikes in between.  The gauge has been widened at least 1-1/2" to accommodate steam locomotives.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photo: MDTX 18122

Eric Hansmann
 

This is actually one of the scenes planned  for my next layout, minus the high water of course. This is on the B&O Allegheny Yard branch in Pittsburgh

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: MDTX 18122

 

Photo: MDTX 18122

A 1913 photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A715.13B.CP/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Only fair quality detail of roof and upper B end.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: inside running rail of the curve will be accompanied by an addition guard rail

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 09:02 PM, Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek wrote:
There may be other reasons why the HTC could get away with such absurd track radii without guard rails.
There was... the size of their motive power. Freight cars of this era were fine with those tight curves, and the Harlem Transfer used a boxcab diesel with trucks that were hardly any longer wheelbase. Even before the diesel the motive power was a tiny 0-4-0. But mainline railroads tended to use larger power for local switching; six couple and smaller eight couple power being common. These long rigid wheelbases had problems with tight curves. The first modification needed was to widen the gauge... as much as 1-1/2 or even two inches, and this has been done. How can I tell? The standard flangeway for guarded curves on 4'-8 1/8" gauge track is just under 2". This is so small that it is not obtainable with standard rail' the bases interfere with each other and the base of the guard rail needs to be sheared. However, when the gauge is widened the guard rail moves in tandem with the opposite running rail. The photos presented have the guard rail so far from the running rail that there is room for spikes in between.  The gauge has been widened at least 1-1/2" to accommodate steam locomotives.

Dennis Storzek