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Re: Block of cars

Rufus Cone
 

Dave Nelson <Lake_Muskoka@...> asked:

Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?
John H. Armstrong in The Railroad What it Is, What It Does, 3rd Ed. Simmons-Boardman, 1990, page 169, says, "The next step in terminal operations is to assemble the cars from various sources into blocks ... headed for individual destinations; ...."  This is in Ch 12 entitled Classification and Blocking.

Coughlin, Freight Car Distribution, 1956 gives a specific example of blocking from the B&O.

You might try these, but the pdf's are not searchable.

  • Railroad Freight Transporation, Loree, 1922
  • Freight terminals and trains, Droege, 1912, available on Internet Archive and elsewhere online and published in multiple editions.

A Google search on "locomotive consist" gives a "consist" discussion like that mentioned by Richard Townsend

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/p/135239/1516637.aspx

along with a lot of official looking railroad industry web pages.

-- 
Rufus Cone
Bozeman, MT


matching trucks on CPR auto boxcars

Robert kirkham
 

I'm looking for advice on HO scale trucks that were used on these cars after the arch bar trucks would have been replaced/updated.  This is for the Yarmouth Model Works kit #109 (link).  I model 1946, and have few photo references close to that date for these cars.  Instead, most of my photos show the cars later in life, so there appears to be a mix of trucks.  Photos aren't great, but hopefully enough to go on:
 

Thanks in advance,

Rob Kirkham


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

mopacfirst
 

'Blocking' is also used as a verb, referring to the act of assembling cars in blocks.  I think, without citation, that this is a very old railroad term.  'Lashup' could have been hostler slang, but not a standard term as used in instruction manuals, I don't believe.

Ron Merrick


Re: Block of cars

Richard Townsend
 

Many years ago MR published a very indignant letter to the editor castigating the magazine for using the term"lashup" and asserting that the only correct term was "locomotive consist." Why this has stuck with me for all these years is unknown.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 5, 2020 4:51 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

From what I’ve read, and heard, “Lashup” is a model railroad term.  Not used by railroaders IRL (In Real Life).
 
Now, I don’t KNOW about “block,” but it seems to me to be a common term to describe arranging a number of objects with some degree of commonality together.  In the case of freight cars (that IS what we’re talking about, right?), that commonality would be a destination, or a consignee.
 
I admit that the brain cells are Blocked (😊 ) from coming up with an example, but still . . .
 
Schuyler
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Wednesday, August 05, 2020 5:46 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block of cars
 
Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?
 
Am debating these matters on another list and nobody participating, myself included, knows the answer.
 
Dave Nelson


Re: Block of cars

Schuyler Larrabee
 

From what I’ve read, and heard, “Lashup” is a model railroad term.  Not used by railroaders IRL (In Real Life).

 

Now, I don’t KNOW about “block,” but it seems to me to be a common term to describe arranging a number of objects with some degree of commonality together.  In the case of freight cars (that IS what we’re talking about, right?), that commonality would be a destination, or a consignee.

 

I admit that the brain cells are Blocked (😊 ) from coming up with an example, but still . . .

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Wednesday, August 05, 2020 5:46 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

 

Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?

 

Am debating these matters on another list and nobody participating, myself included, knows the answer.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Dave;

 

“Block” is definitely a railroad term, and refers to a string of cars destined to an intermediate or final destination from which the block may be broken up or re-classified, like the following:

 

LM4  “Spark Plug”  Cincinnati to Pittsburgh (Scully)  (Daily) MON DIV DROP OFF

Consist: (after Columbus) All freight, except livestock for Pgh and Mon Division points.

Make Up:  Block 1:  Eastern Div. To Pgh (Penn Street), inclusive.

Block 2:  Pittsburgh (Produce Yards) and Pgh (11th Street) ONLY.

Block 3:  Pgh Div points, Pittsburgh (Duquesne) to E. Pgh, inclusive (not Mon!)

Block 4:  Pgh Div points to Dravosburg, exclusive, and Mon Div, Dravosburg to Fairchance, inclusive.  (3/31)

Block 5:  Panhandle Division, etc. to Pgh (Try St.), etc.

This freight did not traverse Mon Div, but likely left Block #4 for pick-up, maybe by ___, for distribution on Mon, as above, after arrival at Scully at 3:30 a.m..

-by ’52 ends in Pitcairn not Scully, Block 2 was Mon Div cars that were dropped off at Thomson around ~9:00 a.m. for connection w/MA50.

 

I have seen it in documents from the thirties, at least, so it is old school.

 

I don’t remember “lash-up” being used by railroaders, but I don’t remember everything clearly. J

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Wednesday, August 5, 2020 5:46 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

 

Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?

 

Am debating these matters on another list and nobody participating, myself included, knows the answer.

 

Dave Nelson


Block of cars

Dave Nelson
 

Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?

 

Am debating these matters on another list and nobody participating, myself included, knows the answer.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

Richard Townsend
 

The mention of pulling up rails reminded me that I have several AFEs from the war years in which the C&S authorized removing various tracks to free up rail for scrap drives.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 5, 2020 9:18 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)
A photo from the Ann Arbor District Library
The World War II scrap drive included pulling up rails as well:
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

Edward
 

Here is an O scale model I built of it in 1987.
My only reference at the time was a photo and brief description of it in the 1953 Carbuilder's Cyclopedia.
Some hand lettering had to be done for what was not available in an SFRD Champion decal set 

Ed Bommer 


Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

A photo from the Ann Arbor District Library

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N082_0380_006.jpg

The World War II scrap drive included pulling up rails as well:

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N186_0033_001.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

A photo from the Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society archives:

https://sfrhms.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/RR-41-A2004-0017-Temple-Railroad-Heritage-Museum-031.jpg

In 1948, Santa Fe had this one-off refrigerator car built in stainless steel by Consolidated Steel Industries. It featured plug doors, convertible bunkers and several other progressive features. Santa Fe used most of these features in rebuilding its aging fleet of wood body reefers that included new steel roofs and sides, but did not repeat the use of stainless steel.

This was the sole member of the Rr-41 class and eventually was renumbered 4150.

A Keith Jordan article on kit bashing an HO model of SFRD 13000 was published in the Second Quarter 1989 issue of Santa Fe Modeler.
For the record, this topic came up on another group when someone mistook this car for an aluminum bodied refrigerator car. Santa Fe had no aluminum bodies refrigerator cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Freight car progress

radiodial868
 

"Drawer of Disappointments"   I like that phrase.
Mine is more like a "Penalty Box"  It is a shelf by the bench where I can place "those who do not cooperate" and let the subconscious work on solutions. I try and never let the penalty box exceed 2 cars before buckling down and getting them past their sticking point.
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Freight car progress

Eric Hansmann
 

I've summarized a few recent projects in my latest blog post. Most are freight cars, except for a cool model of a 1918 truck. Here's the direct link.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


NYC 19000 series caboose color

Walter Cox
 

It looks like pink would work and you can ignore my previous post.
 

In a message dated 8/4/2020 5:05:20 PM Eastern Standard Time, WaltGCox@... writes:
 
Hi Dave,
I would do a test run of the mixture before using it on a model. Back when Floquil was the "go to" paint I was looking for a way to get a faded  appearance on some single sheathed boxcars in grain hauling service and was warned not to add white  as it would turn the red to pink but to use a  buff color.. I can't say if the white would have turned the red pink as I never tried it.
Good luck, Walt
In a message dated 8/4/2020 11:45:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, davelawler@...  writes|
Thank you Mark. I have some Floquil Boxcar red and Reefer White in my old paint stash,
more than enough to paint a HO caboose. I guess I'm good to go.
Dave Lawler


Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Walter Cox
 

Hi Dave,
I would do a test run of the mixture before using it on a model. Back when Floquil was the "go to" paint I was looking for a way to get a faded  appearance on some single sheathed boxcars in grain hauling service and was warned not to add white  as it would turn the red to pink but to use a  buff color.. I can't say if the white would have turned the red pink as I never tried it.
Good luck, Walt
In a message dated 8/4/2020 11:45:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, davelawler@...  writes|

Thank you Mark. I have some Floquil Boxcar red and Reefer White in my old paint stash,
more than enough to paint a HO caboose. I guess I'm good to go.
Dave Lawler


Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Dave Lawler
 

Thank you Peter, you've laid my fears to rest.
Dave Lawler


Re: Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

Richard Townsend
 

-----Original Message-----
From: G.J. Irwin <groups@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Aug 4, 2020 11:47 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

With respect to the Oscar Mayer car, if I recall correctly from my late father's accumulation of HO trains, the folks at Athearn did a car similar to the retouched photo Claus referenced.   It had red sides, black ends and roof, white lettering.  I don't recall if there were any reporting marks.

A "not a Steam Era Freight Car," perhaps?

--George Irwin


Re: Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

G.J. Irwin
 

With respect to the Oscar Mayer car, if I recall correctly from my late father's accumulation of HO trains, the folks at Athearn did a car similar to the retouched photo Claus referenced.   It had red sides, black ends and roof, white lettering.  I don't recall if there were any reporting marks.

A "not a Steam Era Freight Car," perhaps?

--George Irwin


DT&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #2

Bob Chapman
 

Continuing to clean out the three-decade stash of unbuilt styrene undec kits. Front Range kit #4070 features 10-panel riveted sides, 8-foot door, diagonal panel roof, and R-3-4 ends; a prototype near-match is DT&I's #14300-14549 series (the prototype with early improved dreadnaught ends, the model the similar late version). 

As with other circa-1990 kits, the carbody is decent, but the detail parts are well below current standards. Upgrades include Kadee ladders/grabs/Ajax brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. The kit’s deep fishbelly sidesills were modified to match the prototype’s flat bolster-to-bolster profile. The prototype featured a Kerrigan runningboard; I substituted the similar Apex from Yarmouth. Decals are K4.Thanks to Craig Wilson, Tim O’Connor, and John Stanford for their photo and technical help.

Weathering gone wild! -- an attempt to recreate the prototype photo. Craig speculates that the car may have spent a day too many at one of DT&I’s on-line Ohio bagged clay plants.

Regards,
Bob Chapman

 


Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Peter Weiglin
 

Those of us who remember the classic wood NYC cabooses remember that they showed up in different shades of red (or even pink), depending on how long it had been since they were painted.  For many, it was a looong time since painting.

There was a prototype for any shade, somewhere.  Don't get too worked up over the "real" shade.

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