Date   

Re: Freight car progress

Benjamin Hom
 

Gary Laakso wrote:
"The bottom sill sure has the ear marks of a Train Miniature boxcar."

...except the one on BR&P 4500 is inset, and the one on the Train-Miniature DS boxcar protrudes beyond the sheathing, making the model look wrong.


Ben Hom
_._,_._,_


Re: Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

Richard Townsend
 

The one just beyond that has a different type of curved roof: concave.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 6, 2020 9:25 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

The curved rood boxcar next to the #3 on the print, very likely is Northern Pacific.
 
Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)
 
Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)
A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:
Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
Site of the Texas City disaster.
Can anyone identify the loads with more specificity? Caption says "large forms".
Thanks
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

mopacfirst
 

Those could very well literally be 'forms' for concrete work, either for a retaining wall (dike or levee) or a large formed concrete structure.  Could have been something being constructed at the time of the explosion.  Texas City and the areas near Galveston have had levees for a long time, and they use concrete walls in areas where there isn't room for an earthen dike, and sometimes there was a concrete wall at the core of an earthen levee.

Ron Merrick


Photo: String Of Boxcars (Undated - 1900?)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: String Of Boxcars (Undated - 1900?)

A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth1029453/m1/1/?q=depot

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Location not stated.

Reporting marks H&TC and A&NW visible.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

gary laakso
 

The curved rood boxcar next to the #3 on the print, very likely is Northern Pacific.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

 

Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth11869/m1/1/?q=freight%20yard

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Site of the Texas City disaster.

Can anyone identify the loads with more specificity? Caption says "large forms".

Thanks

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: NYC Boxcar 177331 (1950)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: NYC Boxcar 177331 (1950)

A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1242734/m1/1/?q=warehouse

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Built 1945.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Brick Factory With Boxcars (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Brick Factory With Boxcars (Undated)

A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25058/m1/1/?q=factory

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Location not stated.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth11869/m1/1/?q=freight%20yard

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Site of the Texas City disaster.

Can anyone identify the loads with more specificity? Caption says "large forms".

Thanks

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Freight car progress

gary laakso
 

The bottom sill sure has the ear marks of a Train Minatare boxcar.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Retterer
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2020 8:10 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Freight car progress

 

The BR&P boxcar photos I have are the builder's photos from 1909 and 1914.  I don't have any in-service 1920's photos.  But here are the two from the SSCC photographer in Butler, PA.


Re: Freight car progress

Keith Retterer
 

The BR&P boxcar photos I have are the builder's photos from 1909 and 1914.  I don't have any in-service 1920's photos.  But here are the two from the SSCC photographer in Butler, PA.


Re: Freight car progress

Keith Retterer
 

Mine is the "Time-Out Tray".


Re: Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

Edward
 

Thank you for the good word!
I believe the thee-rod plug door was the original.
Lots more moving parts on it perhaps led to a simpler design replacement door.
Maybe done when the car was painted in standard colors and renumbered?

Ed Bommer


Re: Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

Scott
 

My understanding at some point they replaced the door with a more conventional plug door.  Is the proto photo the original or replacement door?

Fantastic model Ed!

Scott McDonald


Re: Block of cars

Robert Allan
 

No historical context here, but on the Missouri Pacific (and subsequently the Union Pacific) the car scheduling system used "Yard Block" (YBLK) as a term since the 1960's. The classification of a shipments characteristics in the the hierarchy of yard block definitions was a first step in the scheduling process. Still is as far as I know.

Bob Allan
Omaha


Re: Block of cars

Rufus Cone
 

Dave Nelson <Lake_Muskoka@...> asked:

Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?
John H. Armstrong in The Railroad What it Is, What It Does, 3rd Ed. Simmons-Boardman, 1990, page 169, says, "The next step in terminal operations is to assemble the cars from various sources into blocks ... headed for individual destinations; ...."  This is in Ch 12 entitled Classification and Blocking.

Coughlin, Freight Car Distribution, 1956 gives a specific example of blocking from the B&O.

You might try these, but the pdf's are not searchable.

  • Railroad Freight Transporation, Loree, 1922
  • Freight terminals and trains, Droege, 1912, available on Internet Archive and elsewhere online and published in multiple editions.

A Google search on "locomotive consist" gives a "consist" discussion like that mentioned by Richard Townsend

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/p/135239/1516637.aspx

along with a lot of official looking railroad industry web pages.

-- 
Rufus Cone
Bozeman, MT


matching trucks on CPR auto boxcars

Robert kirkham
 

I'm looking for advice on HO scale trucks that were used on these cars after the arch bar trucks would have been replaced/updated.  This is for the Yarmouth Model Works kit #109 (link).  I model 1946, and have few photo references close to that date for these cars.  Instead, most of my photos show the cars later in life, so there appears to be a mix of trucks.  Photos aren't great, but hopefully enough to go on:
 

Thanks in advance,

Rob Kirkham


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

mopacfirst
 

'Blocking' is also used as a verb, referring to the act of assembling cars in blocks.  I think, without citation, that this is a very old railroad term.  'Lashup' could have been hostler slang, but not a standard term as used in instruction manuals, I don't believe.

Ron Merrick


Re: Block of cars

Richard Townsend
 

Many years ago MR published a very indignant letter to the editor castigating the magazine for using the term"lashup" and asserting that the only correct term was "locomotive consist." Why this has stuck with me for all these years is unknown.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 5, 2020 4:51 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

From what I’ve read, and heard, “Lashup” is a model railroad term.  Not used by railroaders IRL (In Real Life).
 
Now, I don’t KNOW about “block,” but it seems to me to be a common term to describe arranging a number of objects with some degree of commonality together.  In the case of freight cars (that IS what we’re talking about, right?), that commonality would be a destination, or a consignee.
 
I admit that the brain cells are Blocked (😊 ) from coming up with an example, but still . . .
 
Schuyler
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Wednesday, August 05, 2020 5:46 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block of cars
 
Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?
 
Am debating these matters on another list and nobody participating, myself included, knows the answer.
 
Dave Nelson


Re: Block of cars

Schuyler Larrabee
 

From what I’ve read, and heard, “Lashup” is a model railroad term.  Not used by railroaders IRL (In Real Life).

 

Now, I don’t KNOW about “block,” but it seems to me to be a common term to describe arranging a number of objects with some degree of commonality together.  In the case of freight cars (that IS what we’re talking about, right?), that commonality would be a destination, or a consignee.

 

I admit that the brain cells are Blocked (😊 ) from coming up with an example, but still . . .

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Wednesday, August 05, 2020 5:46 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

 

Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?

 

Am debating these matters on another list and nobody participating, myself included, knows the answer.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Dave;

 

“Block” is definitely a railroad term, and refers to a string of cars destined to an intermediate or final destination from which the block may be broken up or re-classified, like the following:

 

LM4  “Spark Plug”  Cincinnati to Pittsburgh (Scully)  (Daily) MON DIV DROP OFF

Consist: (after Columbus) All freight, except livestock for Pgh and Mon Division points.

Make Up:  Block 1:  Eastern Div. To Pgh (Penn Street), inclusive.

Block 2:  Pittsburgh (Produce Yards) and Pgh (11th Street) ONLY.

Block 3:  Pgh Div points, Pittsburgh (Duquesne) to E. Pgh, inclusive (not Mon!)

Block 4:  Pgh Div points to Dravosburg, exclusive, and Mon Div, Dravosburg to Fairchance, inclusive.  (3/31)

Block 5:  Panhandle Division, etc. to Pgh (Try St.), etc.

This freight did not traverse Mon Div, but likely left Block #4 for pick-up, maybe by ___, for distribution on Mon, as above, after arrival at Scully at 3:30 a.m..

-by ’52 ends in Pitcairn not Scully, Block 2 was Mon Div cars that were dropped off at Thomson around ~9:00 a.m. for connection w/MA50.

 

I have seen it in documents from the thirties, at least, so it is old school.

 

I don’t remember “lash-up” being used by railroaders, but I don’t remember everything clearly. J

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Wednesday, August 5, 2020 5:46 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Block of cars

 

Anyone know when the term ”Block”, describing a set of cars headed to the same location, came into general use?  Or whether that concept is in use outside of North America?  Similar question regarding lcomotives, where I recall hearing the term “lashup” to refer to a set of locos.  Or are these just railfan/model railroader terms?

 

Am debating these matters on another list and nobody participating, myself included, knows the answer.

 

Dave Nelson

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