Date   

Re: Interesting cars on the left

Charles Morrill
 

I think each tank car has a compartment of some sort on the end that contains valves, hoses, gauges, or whatever control equipment for the fluid or gas that is contained in those tanks.

Charlie


From: "gary laakso" <vasa0vasa@...>
To: "main" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>, RealSTMFC@groups.io
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 9:30:40 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Interesting cars on the left

The flat car next to the boxcar does not appear to have bulkheads.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 7:11 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting cars on the left

 

Bulkhead flats with tanks loaded on them, or a form of tank car?

 

Snipped out of an ebay listing, still open for bidding if anyone is interested.

 

Schuyler

 



Re: Galvanized roofs

Mont Switzer
 

I have made the same observation as Brian.  All steam era roofs seemed dark.  I always attributed this to steam locomotive exhaust soot. 

As diesels took over freight cars seemed to stay cleaner and even brighter.  No soot.  Improvements in paint certainly helped this also.

Mont Switzer 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Brian Carlson via groups.io" <prrk41361@...>
Date: 8/14/20 10:32 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Galvanized roofs

In the steam era though you didn’t see massive amounts of peeling paint. At least not in the photos I’ve looked at. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Aug 14, 2020, at 8:37 AM, John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:

Yes.  Some did and some didn't.  Some paints would not stick to galvanized steel at first, so early roofs almost always had their paint peeling off, sometimes dramatically.  Eventually steel manufacturers came up with galvanizing processes that were more "friendly" to paint and paint manufacturers came up with paints that stuck to galvanized panels better.  Eventually, many carbuilders just left the galvanized roofs unpainted.

-- John


Re: Galvanized roofs

Brian Carlson
 

In the steam era though you didn’t see massive amounts of peeling paint. At least not in the photos I’ve looked at. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Aug 14, 2020, at 8:37 AM, John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:

Yes.  Some did and some didn't.  Some paints would not stick to galvanized steel at first, so early roofs almost always had their paint peeling off, sometimes dramatically.  Eventually steel manufacturers came up with galvanizing processes that were more "friendly" to paint and paint manufacturers came up with paints that stuck to galvanized panels better.  Eventually, many carbuilders just left the galvanized roofs unpainted.

-- John


Re: Interesting cars on the left

O Fenton Wells
 

What railroad line is this?


On Fri, Aug 14, 2020 at 10:30 AM gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

The flat car next to the boxcar does not appear to have bulkheads.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 7:11 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting cars on the left

 

Bulkhead flats with tanks loaded on them, or a form of tank car?

 

Snipped out of an ebay listing, still open for bidding if anyone is interested.

 

Schuyler

 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Interesting cars on the left

gary laakso
 

The flat car next to the boxcar does not appear to have bulkheads.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 7:11 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting cars on the left

 

Bulkhead flats with tanks loaded on them, or a form of tank car?

 

Snipped out of an ebay listing, still open for bidding if anyone is interested.

 

Schuyler

 


Re: Galvanized roofs

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I think the greater prominence of peeling in those locations is that the car (and therefore the roof) flexes more at those points, and the “working” of the joints tends to crack whatever protective coating, car cement, paint, galvanizing, whatever, which permits the enemy, water, to penetrate to the victim, steel.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Craig Wilson
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 10:26 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Galvanized roofs

 

And . . . it was common (in the era covered by this list) to coat the roof (and ends and underbody) with black "car cement" to prevent leakage.  This car cement was also prone to peeling off and sometimes was painted over if the car was repainted.  All this is responsible for the wide variety of weathering/coloring on the roofs of these cars for the modeler to ponder and replicate.

 

And . . . I was told once years ago that the peeling effect was more prominent at the ends and middle (doorways) of the cars.  This is because there was more likely to be empty space above the cargo at these locations thus greater heat build-up there.

 

Craig Wilson


Re: Interesting cars on the left

O Fenton Wells
 

Vinegar tank cars???
Fenton

On Fri, Aug 14, 2020 at 10:10 AM Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Bulkhead flats with tanks loaded on them, or a form of tank car?

 

Snipped out of an ebay listing, still open for bidding if anyone is interested.

 

Schuyler

 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Galvanized roofs

Craig Wilson
 

And . . . it was common (in the era covered by this list) to coat the roof (and ends and underbody) with black "car cement" to prevent leakage.  This car cement was also prone to peeling off and sometimes was painted over if the car was repainted.  All this is responsible for the wide variety of weathering/coloring on the roofs of these cars for the modeler to ponder and replicate.

And . . . I was told once years ago that the peeling effect was more prominent at the ends and middle (doorways) of the cars.  This is because there was more likely to be empty space above the cargo at these locations thus greater heat build-up there.

Craig Wilson


Interesting cars on the left

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Bulkhead flats with tanks loaded on them, or a form of tank car?

 

Snipped out of an ebay listing, still open for bidding if anyone is interested.

 

Schuyler

 


Re: Galvanized roofs

John Sykes III
 

Yes.  Some did and some didn't.  Some paints would not stick to galvanized steel at first, so early roofs almost always had their paint peeling off, sometimes dramatically.  Eventually steel manufacturers came up with galvanizing processes that were more "friendly" to paint and paint manufacturers came up with paints that stuck to galvanized panels better.  Eventually, many carbuilders just left the galvanized roofs unpainted.

-- John


Galvanized roofs

Brian Shumaker
 

A recent post on another forum discussed weathering of steel boxcar roofs and I queried if all cars had galvanized roofs. Why, does it seem, some cars shed their roof top paint and others didn't?  Did some car makers use galvanized panels while others did not?
Brian


Re: Photo: SFRD 13000 - Stainless Steel Reefer (1946)

Fred Jansz
 

Impressive car.
Would love one in my reefer collection.
Is there a model?


Ignore, please delete

Schuyler Larrabee
 

 


Re: a little help from the ACL experts

Benjamin Scanlon
 

I have a fair number of ACL photos harvested from all over, tho not including this type of DS boxcar, but I can see no freight car with this version of ACL logo and it's just the thing a toy train company would put on a model. 
--
Ben Scanlon
Tottenham, England


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Keep them coming!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rene LaVoise
Sent: Thursday, August 13, 2020 9:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

 

Thanks Elden.  The Monon gon was a pretty easy project using the spiral ends from Shapeways. 

I have two other kit-bashes of USRA gons waiting for their trip through the paint shop, Ted Culotta's Litchfield & Madison from the St Louis 2018 RPM and a W&LE with replacement steel sides.

--
René LaVoise
Kirkwood, MO


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Rene LaVoise
 

Thanks Elden.  The Monon gon was a pretty easy project using the spiral ends from Shapeways. 

I have two other kit-bashes of USRA gons waiting for their trip through the paint shop, Ted Culotta's Litchfield & Madison from the St Louis 2018 RPM and a W&LE with replacement steel sides.

--
René LaVoise
Kirkwood, MO


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Chuck;

 

That was one of the most difficult resin kits I’ve ever built.  Unbelievable fit problems.

 

I had no idea Tichy did decals for EJ&E!

 

Thanks for sharing!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chuck Cover
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 3:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

 

Thanks for the kind words Elden.  The EJ&E boxcar is indeed an ancient Sunshine #11.1.  I love the way it looks next to the larger boxcars that dominate most 1950s layouts.  I think the kit came without decals, so I used the Tichy.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: a little help from the ACL experts

David Wiggs
 

Agreed, on rolling stock I don't think the herald was ever used on any freight car or MOW equipment, but was used on observation car placards.  It was used on diesel engines from onset of cab units and on hood units starting with GP7s and also on TOFC trailers.  Letter coloring was either silver or purple and shifted to white when car bodies became black.  TOFC heralds were yellow with black lettering.  When used on their steamers, they used the ACL monogram on the tenders and occasionally on the engine front.  Way more info than needed, but hey....


Re: Photo: SFRD 13000 - Stainless Steel Reefer (1946)

Bob Chaparro
 

Not really, Andy.

In the late 1880 Southern California citrus nurserymen went north of the Tehachapi Mountains to market nursery stock.

Tulare County Genealogy Trails tells us that "In 1892 there were boosters a-plenty for the new [citrus] industry. It was deemed desirable to show the world that a new citrus district, producing fruit unequaled, had been discovered. The World's Fair at St. Louis was to open January 1, 1904. Above all things it behooved growers here to make a big showing. P. M. Baier was selected to prepare such an exhibit. The first full carload to leave the county was the fruit for this display and it required practically all grown in the county lo fill it."

This source goes on to say, "In 1893 there were four carloads at the Frost orchard, and in the next season the Exchange and the Earl Fruit Companies entered the field, getting out a pack of sixteen cars. This fruit reached the eastern market in time for the Thanksgiving and Christmas markets and sold for extra high prices. As this period of ripening is several weeks in advance of Southern California a great deal of attention was attracted to this locality and many southern growers came, saw the results accomplished, and invested."

Finally, the crop report for 1945 from the Tulare County Agricultural Commissioner/Sealer shows that there were nearly 36,000 acres of bearing Valencia and navel oranges in the county. That same report shows over eight million boxes of oranges were produced in the county.

So the photo caption unquestionably is wrong.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: SFRD 13000 - Stainless Steel Reefer (1946)

Brian Termunde
 

Not that I disagree with what you or anyone else says, it does show Bob C. is correct, it IS a poorly written caption to leave so much to the imagination.

My comment was strictly meant to a *possibility*, as I have no way to actually know, so I speculated. Nothing more.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

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