Date   

Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

nyc3001 .
 

Hi guys,

I just got a Sunshine URTX 1948-1949 reefer kit, but it has no instructions or PDS. Does anyone have the documents for this kit?

Thanks,
Phil


Re: Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

Bill Keene
 

The West Bottoms was a very busy place. 

From the far distance coming forward there are the freight houses and yards of the following railroads:
CRI&P
MKT
MILW
ATSF
CB&Q
C&A — later GM&O
SLSF. 

Not viewable behind the large building in the left distance is a UP yard — State Line Yard. Also, just off the photo to the right is a KCT yard, a Wabash yard, and a KCS yard. 

The Kansas City Terminal Railway (KCT) also had trackage amongst these railroads in the photo. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Aug 21, 2020, at 10:04 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)
A fair quality photo from the Kansas City Public Library:
Click on the photo to enlarge it.
Quite a variety of freight cars.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

mel perry
 

interesting track arrangment
mel perry

On Fri, Aug 21, 2020, 10:08 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

A photo from the Artstor website:

https://library.artstor.org/#/asset/SS7729601_7729601_641419;prevRouteTS=1597971625034

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Taken at Wilmington, Delaware.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: WAB Postwar AAR DD Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #4

Robert kirkham
 

Really nice model!  Am very curious to hear what paint/ colour you used for the faded boxcar red?

Rob

On Aug 21, 2020, at 10:12 AM, Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:

Wabash #8188 is a member of the 300-car DD boxcars series #8000-8299 of 1950. The carbodies featured 12-foot door openings, R-3-4 early improved dreadnaught ends, riveted panels, and a diagonal panel roof. Front Range’s circa-1990 kit #4090 nearly matches this prototype, exceptions being a 13-foot door opening and the later-style improved dreadnaught ends.  

The door opening was narrowed to 12 feet with styrene spacers, and the deep-fishbelly sidesill narrowed to more typical depth, bolster to bolster. Contemporary detail adds include Apex runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders and Miner brakewheel, and Tahoe Barber S-2 trucks. Decals are K4.

Thanks to Chet French for his technical help. Fun fact – according to Chet (and confirmed on the WAB lettering diagram), WAB added an extra 3” between the first and second numeral of a 4-digit car number; if five digits, the space moved between the second and third numerals.   

Regards,
Bob Chapman

<WAB Ptd.JPG><WAB DD Unptd.JPG>


WAB Postwar AAR DD Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #4

Bob Chapman
 

Wabash #8188 is a member of the 300-car DD boxcars series #8000-8299 of 1950. The carbodies featured 12-foot door openings, R-3-4 early improved dreadnaught ends, riveted panels, and a diagonal panel roof. Front Range’s circa-1990 kit #4090 nearly matches this prototype, exceptions being a 13-foot door opening and the later-style improved dreadnaught ends.  

The door opening was narrowed to 12 feet with styrene spacers, and the deep-fishbelly sidesill narrowed to more typical depth, bolster to bolster. Contemporary detail adds include Apex runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders and Miner brakewheel, and Tahoe Barber S-2 trucks. Decals are K4.

Thanks to Chet French for his technical help. Fun fact – according to Chet (and confirmed on the WAB lettering diagram), WAB added an extra 3” between the first and second numeral of a 4-digit car number; if five digits, the space moved between the second and third numerals.   

Regards,
Bob Chapman


Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

A photo from the Artstor website:

https://library.artstor.org/#/asset/SS7729601_7729601_641419;prevRouteTS=1597971625034

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Taken at Wilmington, Delaware.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

A fair quality photo from the Kansas City Public Library:

https://kchistory.org/islandora/object/kchistory%3A104507/datastream/OBJ/view

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Quite a variety of freight cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Ship anchors?

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Aug 21, 2020, at 08:16, Edward <edb8381@gmail.com> wrote:

[...]

Anchors for a flatcar load would be more like those used on large naval vessels and ocean going ships since the late 19th century, having two large flukes attached to a shank with an eyelet for attaching the anchor chain. At about 10 tons or so each, four such anchors would make a good flat car load, held in place with wood blocking. The attached photo will show the scale of these anchors, from a person sitting by it.
[alert: era-dependencies at work]

There were (and in a few cases still are preserved) sailing ships built in the late 19th century and even a few steam axiliaries built in the early 20th which carried the sliding stock anchors. Balclutha, 1886, Connell & Sons, Glagsgow (one of the first 20 or so steel-hulled sailing ships[0]) is currently resident at the only floating national park in the US and its territories[1]. The more modern naval anchor doesn't cat up like the earlier design, so even the early steam auxiliaries with the more traditional hull shape carried the earlier design of anchor.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, docent emeritus, footnote [1]

[0] for non-military use, steam was for high-priority cargoes, like people and mail - vide the Pacific Mail Steamship company. For the lower-priority cargo, sail was still for a long time less expensive to operate than was steam, especially for bulk haulers.

[1] San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park: <https://www.nps.gov/safr/index.htm>


Re: Ship anchors?

Robert kirkham
 

Not an area I am expert on, but have spent a fair amount of time looking at models of anchors.   For ship building, I would think most anchors were made near the shipyard, moved aboard the ship and spent their life at sea.  So if you model trackage from the anchor maker to the shipyard, OK I guess.  But I imagine most makers were at water’s edge and movement was direct from the site to the ship, or by barge from the site to the shipyard.  

For an anchor of that design, you’re looking at quite the anomaly at that size.  I think it is a larger scale model.  If it was smaller, then I could see such an anchor as part of merchandise shipped from here to there for smaller vessels.  https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/3274142/STEVSHARK/Vryhof_Anhor_History.pdf?t=1493214503869 this page has a history of designs.  Not an expert as I say, but those models look very old.


Rob Kirkham   

On Aug 21, 2020, at 7:49 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi List Members,
 
I was sorting thru a box of junk I didn't even know I had, and I found these small ship anchors - see attached image. In my chosen scale (N) these are about 9 feet in length as can be seen on the scale ruler. Doing a quick internet search on "ship anchor dimensions" confirms that anchors of this size do (and did) indeed exist.
 
I assume ship anchors were shipped in steam era freight cars? I ask because I have not yet ever seen a photo of such a shipment.
 
Would they be shipped on flat cars? In gondolas? Would they have simply been tied down, or would they have been blocked in some way to keep them from shifting around during transit?
 
Any thoughts? Conjectures? Factual information? All are welcome.
 
Claus Schlund
 
<20200821_103337.jpg>


Re: Ship anchors?

Edward
 
Edited

The anchors you show are what's called a kedge anchor, with a top crossbar that can be permanent, or able to be folded down along the shank for easier storage.
It is a late 18th century design, sill made, but now for small craft. 

Anchors for a flatcar load would be more like those used on large naval vessels and ocean going ships since the late 19th century, having two large flukes attached to a shank with an eyelet for attaching the anchor chain. At about 10 tons or so each, four such anchors would make a good flat car load, held in place with wood blocking.  The attached photo will show the scale of these anchors, from a person sitting by it. 

Ed Bommer


Ship anchors?

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I was sorting thru a box of junk I didn't even know I had, and I found these small ship anchors - see attached image. In my chosen scale (N) these are about 9 feet in length as can be seen on the scale ruler. Doing a quick internet search on "ship anchor dimensions" confirms that anchors of this size do (and did) indeed exist.
 
I assume ship anchors were shipped in steam era freight cars? I ask because I have not yet ever seen a photo of such a shipment.
 
Would they be shipped on flat cars? In gondolas? Would they have simply been tied down, or would they have been blocked in some way to keep them from shifting around during transit?
 
Any thoughts? Conjectures? Factual information? All are welcome.
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Railcar Photos.com

StephenK
 

I deleted my cache and that did it.   I never had this problem before.   

Railcar Photos is a great site and I find it extremely valuable.

Steve Kay


Re: Boxcar Dimension Questions for a Decal Project

Dave Parker
 

Matt:

At that time, T&G V-groove siding was either 3-1/4 or 2-5/8; the latter was actually 5-1/4 siding with a V-grove down the middle of the board.  My sense is that the 3-1/4 was far more common.

I usually check against a known length, like an 18" grab.  Or you can use the known/ approximate length of the car.  The difference between the two siding types is large enough (24% of the narrower spacing) that it is pretty easy to figure out what's on the car.

Hope this helps.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Boxcar Dimension Questions for a Decal Project

Matt Goodman
 

Thanks for the help Howard.

On Aug 20, 2020, at 3:00 PM, earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:

Found the American Straw Board in the April 1908 ORER
No dimensions
series 1-25 and 101-107
Listed under United Box Board and Paper Co.
Same info updated Sept 1908
Same info updated July 1909 listed  in Aug 1910 ORER
Listed in index Dec 1911 - could not locate
Gone from the Dec 1912 ORER

Howard Garner




Re: Boxcar Dimension Questions for a Decal Project

earlyrail
 

Found the American Straw Board in the April 1908 ORER
No dimensions
series 1-25 and 101-107
Listed under United Box Board and Paper Co.
Same info updated Sept 1908
Same info updated July 1909 listed  in Aug 1910 ORER
Listed in index Dec 1911 - could not locate
Gone from the Dec 1912 ORER

Howard Garner



Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Auto Loader (Circa 1930s)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

RJ;

 

You are correct.  I uncovered dozens of photos of auto damage claims on the PRR during my searches, and the teens thru thirties were the worst.  There was a lot of bad blocking & tie-downs, cars bumping one another, damage on the racks, etc.  It took a long while to get it right.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of radiodial868
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2020 11:20 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Auto Loader (Circa 1930s)

 

On Thu, Aug 20, 2020 at 06:30 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:

I've always wondered how many automobiles got squashed during shipment...

A friend's dad used to work at an auto dealership in the early 1950's. He said they routinely did repairs on nicks and scratches, and sometimes major dents and damage at the dealership from cars that arrived by both rail (team track) and auto carrier.  All part of the "Dealer Prep" that still exists today. Most of the damage occurred during loading and unloading. If it occurred during loading, the damage area would be numbered with a grease pencil, and the dealership would get a credit from the factory. 
I imagine the 1930's-40's would have been even worse.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Re: Railcar Photos.com

G.J. Irwin
 

Follow up: As of 12:30PM Eastern Time, the railcarphotos.com site appears to be to be back up and running normally.  A search I performed worked correctly as well.

Cheers,
George Irwin


Re: C&O 70 town hopper help

Brian Carlson
 

It is definitely a Kato. Black is correct. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Aug 20, 2020, at 11:41 AM, Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:



Schuyler,

 

I stand corrected, I believe that is a KATO model.  Details are not as fine a the IM cars----more opportunities for the prototype modeler.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2020 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O 70 town hopper help

 

Well, CURRENT IM models have different sill steps and a few other minor differences.

 

https://www.intermountain-railway.com/ho/hohoppers.html

and scroll down a LOT.

 

I’ve seen that sort of  “protective packaging” before which I think should assist in identifying the manufacturer.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2020 7:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O 70 town hopper help

 

Lester,

 

Looks like an Intermountain model.  I have one and it checked out nicely with prototype photos.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lester Breuer
Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2020 7:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] C&O 70 town hopper help

 

I am attaching a photo of a C&O class “LO” hopper model gifted me.  Number and other lettering appear to be accurate for a 70 hopper in the series the hopper is in.  I am asking if the black color is correct or should it be gray?   And, who produced the hopper?  Thank you for your time and effort to help in advance.

Lester Breuer

Attachments:


Re: C&O 70 town hopper help

Mont Switzer
 

Schuyler,

 

I stand corrected, I believe that is a KATO model.  Details are not as fine a the IM cars----more opportunities for the prototype modeler.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2020 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O 70 town hopper help

 

Well, CURRENT IM models have different sill steps and a few other minor differences.

 

https://www.intermountain-railway.com/ho/hohoppers.html

and scroll down a LOT.

 

I’ve seen that sort of  “protective packaging” before which I think should assist in identifying the manufacturer.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2020 7:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O 70 town hopper help

 

Lester,

 

Looks like an Intermountain model.  I have one and it checked out nicely with prototype photos.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lester Breuer
Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2020 7:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] C&O 70 town hopper help

 

I am attaching a photo of a C&O class “LO” hopper model gifted me.  Number and other lettering appear to be accurate for a 70 hopper in the series the hopper is in.  I am asking if the black color is correct or should it be gray?   And, who produced the hopper?  Thank you for your time and effort to help in advance.

Lester Breuer

Attachments:


Re: Photos: Auto Loader (Circa 1930s)

radiodial868
 

On Thu, Aug 20, 2020 at 06:30 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:
I've always wondered how many automobiles got squashed during shipment...
A friend's dad used to work at an auto dealership in the early 1950's. He said they routinely did repairs on nicks and scratches, and sometimes major dents and damage at the dealership from cars that arrived by both rail (team track) and auto carrier.  All part of the "Dealer Prep" that still exists today. Most of the damage occurred during loading and unloading. If it occurred during loading, the damage area would be numbered with a grease pencil, and the dealership would get a credit from the factory. 
I imagine the 1930's-40's would have been even worse.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA

8341 - 8360 of 185271