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Re: model freight car origiin

John
 

I'm very glad to see this information. I have one, complete with the folded paper crates shown in the Varney brochure (and X2f couplers) that was my dad's. I never knew who made it. Since Dad spent all his working years at Chrysler, I suspect that is why he bought it. Thanks for sharing.

John Bopp
Farmington Hills, MI


Re: WAB Postwar AAR DD Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #4

Michael Gross
 

Another beauty, Bob. Thank you!
--
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Re: Ship anchors?

Charles
 
Edited

Here's a source for model anchors like the one shown in post 176991: https://floatingdrydock.com/JH-B6.jpg . It's a 30,000 lb. in 1/96 scale -- probable "too much" for N scale but suitable as a lighter weight one in HO. The vendor has a lot of neat ship model parts that are applicable to model railroad freight cars such as fine chain and other parts that could be used as loads. The website is a little difficult to navigate (pun intended) but this would be a good port to set sail (I'll be here all week, be sure to tell your friends) from: https://floatingdrydock.com/ -- scroll down to the bottom of the page.


Photos: N&W Freight Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: N&W Freight Cars

Photo links from the Virginia Tech University Library:

Baggage, Box, Ballast, and Basket Railroad Cars (242 photos) -

https://imagebase.lib.vt.edu/browse.php?folio_ID=/trans/nss/cars/box

Coal, Coke, Dump, and Pitch Cars -

https://imagebase.lib.vt.edu/browse.php?folio_ID=/trans/nss/cars/coa

Flat and Rack Cars (78 photos) -

https://imagebase.lib.vt.edu/browse.php?folio_ID=/trans/nss/cars/flat

Gondola Cars (113 photos) -

https://imagebase.lib.vt.edu/browse.php?folio_ID=/trans/nss/cars/gon

Hopper Cars (329 photos) -

https://imagebase.lib.vt.edu/browse.php?folio_ID=/trans/nss/cars/hop

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Suitable trucks for Sylvan CPR 1938, '40 and '42 auto boxcar

Robert kirkham
 

Part of my ongoing “build the stash” summer.  Looking for recommendations on suitable trucks for these steel auto-boxcars.  They were CPR 295500-295799, with the series expanding as follows:
1938:  295500 - 295549
1940:  295500 - 295649
1942:  295500 - 295799

I realize they may have had different trucks on the 1938 cars compared to 1940 or '42 cars.  

An article in 1938-39 Railway Transportation (I think; its a poor copy) describes the trucks (where legible) as: 

"Symmington cast steel side frame type, with journal boxes integral, and journals are in 5 x 9 in. ... “No flange” spring planks are utilized.  In addition to the standard bolster springs, the trucks have … snubber in each group of springs, AAR standard journal bearings, wedges … dust guards are used, and the brake beams are the AAR standard type no. 15, with economy heads [or is it beads] and … third point support.”

I’m having trouble finding any other photos showing as built trucks for any of these cars.  

Took this poor screen capture from a photo of 295616, and to me it looks like a Vulcan truck on Kadee’s list, #573 HGC trucks.  

Thanks in advance for any help,

Rob 


Re: model freight car origiin

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

 

    The heck of it, Ben, is that when compared to Athearn Blue Box kits 15 years later at $1.69 these

Early Varney kits were expensive for their era. Oh well, at least one had a steel box car with operating

doors and scale tracks that operated without gross “claws” on the bottom.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Ship anchors?

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

    Unless a kedge anchor was so large that it might overhang the sides of a flat car and thus become a special move as a wide load why would they be shipped on a flat car instead of in a gondola in which

It would seem would require a lot less time and expense for blocking? Don’t know, just asking as it

doesn’t seem to make sense.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 


Re: Photo: Fire Truck In A PM Boxcar (1950)

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Ken Akerboom wrote: “Note the end doors on the PM”.

 

   Thanks for that observation Ken.  You may be correct but I’m not certain given that I can’t see as much in the shadows and cannot find such a car in Million & Paton’s Pere Marquette Revenue Freight Cars book. If there is an

end door that would be the easiest way to unload the firetruck. If not I’ll stick with the heavy duty floor jack under

the differential.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 

 


Re: Photo: Fire Truck In A PM Boxcar (1950)

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Such a door arrangement would certainly seem to have helped the poor fellows who

had to unload that fire truck, assuming the doors on the opposite side were positioned

in the same way. Before you pointed out the car to the right, Brent, I was thinking that

the only way the fire truck was coming out was with a heavy duty floor jack under the

differential to swing the rear end out while someone was carefully handling the steering

wheel to keep the left front from contacting the opposite inside of the freight car. With

doors in the position of the car to the right I suspect a good driver could have driven it in.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 

 


Re: Interesting cars on the left

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

In addition to being a B&M photo to being a B&M photo it is from Dane Malcolm who will sell you a

reprint in almost any size you could want. A very pleasant fellow to work with.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 


Re: WP 29' Coil Gondolas

dave w
 

Garth
That is a fabulous piece of railroad history, as both a media, art and social commentary.
I can see Ren & Stimpy in those guys, and as Jim says, a nice project to model (even though I'll never have 29' in N scale I like to loading pattern),
cheers davew
≠≠≠


Re: a little help from the ACL experts

Larry Goolsby
 

Confirming what others have said, the ACL "script" herald was not a rolling stock herald and in my many years of compiling photos and other research, I've never found any evidence it was used on boxcars or any other revenue freight car. Its main use was on steam locos starting with the R-1 4-8-4s of 1938, then applied to all steam shortly after, and of course on the nose of diesel cab units and the sides of diesel hood units (but......not on switchers except a few of the very earliest ones). If you want one more bit of trivia, the script herald was never used on ACL passenger equipment lettering except for the B&O domes leased for service on the Florida Special right before the 1967 merger. The script herald did appear on some MofW rolling stock, and of course was used extensively on public timetables, other publications, certain building signs, etc. etc. 

The USRA boxcars used just ACL initials from delivery into the mid-1920 or so, then had the road name (in Roman font) within a circle logo added at right. This lettering continued when these cars were rebuilt with steel sides in 1937. About 1947, the herald font was changed to sans-serif. If you're still reading, I'll add that 50 of the 1937 rebuilds were further rebuilt in 1942-43 into passenger box express cars and received Pullman green bodies with while lettering consisting of the spelled-out road name and Railway Express Agency. But in no instance was there ever a script herald. 

Larry Goolsby 
ACL & SAL HS 



















 


Re: model freight car origiin

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Pfeiffer wrote:

Maybe early Mantua kits?

      No, definitely Varney. Ben Hom's reply is clear.

Tony Thompson




Re: Ship anchors?

Jim Betz
 

Claus,

  The type of anchors you have are the kind used for sailing vessels and early steam
powered ships and would be unlikely on anything diesel.  And very unlikely on any
"large, modern -ship- such as a naval vessel.  Also relatively unlikely on smaller 
craft such as fishing vessels (except for sailing).  Those are what I'd call "medium
duty" rather than heavy duty.  The kind others pointed to with the pivoting stock are
available in sizes from about 3 pounds and on up to modern naval vessels.  The
type you have - with a fixed stock - I've never seen in use or for sale ... mostly I've
seen them with sailing ships at museums.  But they would have been in common
use in the 20's.
 
  I think you may have 'missed the point'.  In 1929 a lot of shipping was still done by
sail.  So anchors of the type you have were still in use and still being made and
shipped even though it was an "old" design at the time of your RR.
  
  Having said the above - I've never seen a picture of anchors of your style on/in a rail car
of any type (flat or box car).  I'm not saying they weren't shipped by rail - I'm just saying I
don't remember ever seeing a picture of one/several on a rail car.  
  If you do decide to use them they would go to a ship chandler or naval facility near the
waterfront - probably even to one that has a dock.  They would be shipped from a 'mill'
or other such business capable of casting large heavy stuff.
  Anchors are heavy and need some serious weight handling equpment to move them
around.  Once on the ship they are hauled up and down by use of a winch with serious
lifting power.  Anchors -do- get lost (left on the sea floor) from time to time so ships
would, infrequently, need to replace them.  Changing to a different style of anchor for
an existing ship would not be likely - the movable stock style normally are stowed in
the anchor chain/hawser hole and the fixed stock style are 'hung near that same
hole' ... quite different methods.
                                                                                                                    - Jim


SOLD, no longer available-castings for a 1916 built WP 40' SS box car-blems

Andy Carlson
 


Hello-
The castings for the Western Pacific 40' SS HO box car have been sold.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: model freight car origiin

Dave Pfeiffer
 

Maybe early Mantua kits?

 

Dave Pfeiffer

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2020 9:36 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] model freight car origiin

 

     List members, I have two ancient flat cars, both the same, with a wood body, cast (Zamac?) underframe, and a steel sheet body wrapped around the wood. The plastic AB brake parts look like what Varney later supplied, so I surmise that these were early Varney products. But one source suggested to me that Athearn also once had a similar flat car.

      Photo of underbody below. The stake pockets are pressed out from the side sill, and are rounded, not square at all. My two cars are both black, B&O and B&LE. Does anyone know the origin of these cars?

 

Tony

 

 


Re: model freight car origiin

Paul Koehler
 

Tony:

 

After seeing Ben’s response with the instruction I agree.  It’s a Varney.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] model freight car origiin

 

I had one just like that years ago, I think yours is one of the early Athearns.

 

     No, the kit instructions for the two companies are distinctly different, and it's a Varney. I admit I hadn't thought of searching on the web for old kit instructions.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: model freight car origiin

Tony Thompson
 

I had one just like that years ago, I think yours is one of the early Athearns.

     No, the kit instructions for the two companies are distinctly different, and it's a Varney. I admit I hadn't thought of searching on the web for old kit instructions.

Tony Thompson




Re: model freight car origiin

Paul Koehler
 

Tony:

 

I had one just like that years ago, I think yours is one of the early Athearns.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2020 6:36 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] model freight car origiin

 

     List members, I have two ancient flat cars, both the same, with a wood body, cast (Zamac?) underframe, and a steel sheet body wrapped around the wood. The plastic AB brake parts look like what Varney later supplied, so I surmise that these were early Varney products. But one source suggested to me that Athearn also once had a similar flat car.

      Photo of underbody below. The stake pockets are pressed out from the side sill, and are rounded, not square at all. My two cars are both black, B&O and B&LE. Does anyone know the origin of these cars?

 

Tony

 

 


Re: Covered Hopper Help

twsicrr
 

I believe the pictured car is IC 79000 — from IC series 79000-79031.  

The following may be more information about these cars than you want or need:  In the April 1945 IC List of Freight Car Equipment (an internal IC publication that included much other information) it shows 14 cars in the 79000-79031 number series.  The covered hoppers are shown as having a capacity of 50 tons; an interior length of 22’-0”; and an inside width of 9’-5-1/2”.  

I believe the 79000 series 50-ton covered hoppers were converted from IC USRA steel 50 ton, twin open hoppers.  

The 1945 list shows the USRA 50-ton twin open hoppers in number series 65000-65958; there were 957 cars in that number series as of April 1945.  The inside length of those cars is shown as 30’-6”; the inside width is shown as 9-5-1/2”.  The difference in interior length between the open hoppers and the covered hoppers is, I believe, because new steeper slope sheets were riveted inside the converted covered hoppers to permit them to be self-clearing with cement lading — which requires a steeper angle in a self-clearing car than coal or gravel.

The IC USRA steel twin open hoppers were originally in the 210000-210999 number series.  The 1932 OER showed 982 cars in that number series.  The April 1938 OER showEd 979 members in the number series.  

The July 1940 OER is the first one that I have that shows the rebuilt covered hoppers.  It shows 14 50-ton covered hoppers in the 79000-79099 number series.  It also shows 960 USRA 50-ton twin hoppers divided between the 210000-210999 and 65000-65959 series (a renumbering of the USRA twin hoppers  was apparently in-process).  

The 1943 OER showed 958 USRA 50 ton twin hoppers in number series 65000-65959 and 14 50-ton  steel covered hoppers in number series 79000-79031.  

The April 1946 showEd 954 USRA twin hoppers and 14 twin covered hoppers.  

The October 1949 OER showed just 187 USRA twin hoppers in the 65000 number series and just 7 twin covered hoppers in the 79000 number series.  

The January 1950 OER shows no USRA twin hoppers but still shows 7 50-ton covered hoppers in the 79000 number series.  

The January 1952 IC equipment list shows that none of the 79000 series 50-ton twin covered hoppers remained, but did show 70-ton covered hoppers in several 79000 number series.

I have long been intrigued by the IC 50-ton twin covered hoppers.  The wreck photo is the first photograph I have seen of one of these cars.  If anyone has a side view of an IC 50-ton 79000 series car I would be most interested in seeing it.  Based on my research, there may never have been more than 14 of the converted 50-ton covered hoppers in the 79000 series.

Any additional information on these cars would be welcome.

Tom Sinks

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