Date   

Re: Dimensional Data - wrong assumptions

Dave Parker
 

Don:

I am not sure what the B&M was up when I look past my mid-1930s era of interest.  As I said, with box-cars up through the XM-1s (but not beyond; I haven't looked), I have never seen all four measurements (EXW and EXH and EW and EH) stenciled on a car, regardless of date.  Looking just at the XM-1s, the ORERs through 1935 only give EW and EH (8-11 and 12-5).  Starting with my 1937 copy, however, they all give both EW and EXW as 9-6, and both EH and EXH as 12-1.  And yet the photos, even of 72662 in 1954, show only the original 8-11 and 12-5 values.  Huh?

Taken at face value, the 9-6 and 12-1 values are almost certainly EXW and EXH (probably representing the upper door tracks), but otherwise I cannot begin to explain what the heck the B&M was doing, or why.

Bottom line from a modeling standpoint:  apply lettering that matches contemporaneous photos, and don't overthink the problem.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Wabash kit bash

Tony Thompson
 

I have just finished a kit bash of a 17000 series Wabash automobile car, the original kit was a Funaro and Camerlengo car with wood side doors and Murphy ends. I used Rocket Express Youngstown side doors, 3,3,3, Dreadnaught ends and automobile car end doors I did this as I have not long since built the original Wabash version see below.
I love the steel doors and ends. Excellent work, Paul.


Tony Thompson
tony@...


Re: Salt weathering

Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

  1)  When did the use of galvanized on roofs become ubiquitous?  I
       associate "peeling paint on the roof" with more modern cars.  Am
       I wrong?

Yep. It was about 1910. You're closer to right about UNPAINTED galvanized.

  2) How common/uncommon would it be to see a galvanized roof
      combined with wood roof walks?

     In 1910 and thereafter? Universal.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: PRR Depressed Center Flatcar 470011 (1949)

Brian Termunde
 

Ugh! Why do words just up and disappear! <G>

Somehow when I wrote "There's a small hill on the viewers right, the area around the plant, for as long as I can remember." either my computer or the internet (yeah, Right! <G>) deleted the words " . . . the area around the plant was flat as a pancake." 

Sorry about this glitch, which obviously wasn't my fault (oh yes, of course it wasn't! <G>)!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

Re: Photo: PRR Depressed Center Flatcar 470011 (1949)
From: Brian Termunde
Date: Mon, 07 Sep 2020 15:34:43 PDT
Bob,
Thanks for sharing this. I especially appreciate knowing some of the background as my uncle worked there for quite some time and it's been a part of Salt Lake for many years. My uncle and his family lived not too far south of the plant (walking distance, although I rather doubt that Uncle Vern would have walked! <G>).

I do want to stress that I am NOT trying to shoot the messenger as the information provided is what's on that very interesting website, however I don't think that it was taken at the actual Gadsby Plant. In the photo;


There's a small hill on the viewers right, the area around the plant, for as long as I can remember. Here's a link to a Google map showing the area;


That being said, I am sorry but I cannot offer any suggestion as the the actual location.

Bob, Thanks again for another interesting photo!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


Re: Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

Brian Termunde
 

Bob,
Thanks once again for a wonderful photo!

A number of years ago, (way past the time frame this wonderful and educational group focuses on - so I am sorry!) I was aboard a passenger train (again off topic . . . sorry!) heading east across the Nevada desert. A little girl, in her unintentionally loud voice said, "Grandma, is THAT snow?" her grandmother told her no, it was alkali. Not that the kid knew what that was.

The next morning we were finally nearing Salt Lake and were passing the salt plants west of here when that little one asked her grandmother, "Grandma, is THAT snow?" She sighed, and told the girl no, that it was SALT. There was a pause, and then the child snorted, "Yeah, RIGHT!" the rest of us burst out laughing! How could she being so young understand that it was indeed salt.

Sorry, but this post brought back this delightful memory.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)
From: Bob Chaparro
Date: Tue, 08 Sep 2020 09:37:36 PDT
Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)
A photo from the Utah State Historical Society:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
Looks like boring, tough work.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: UP Gondola 63960 In Discharge Mode (1922)

Brian Termunde
 

Josh;
Thanks for pointing this out in another great find by Bob.

Being that my folks were born and raised in Salt Lake, whereas my elder brother and I were born and raised in LA, I have a natural affinity for the LA&SL!

I recently found in a local hobby shop a LA&SL custom decorated (N Scale) box car and immediately purchased it. While unlikely that that a 36 foot truss rod box car would've been still around in my 1953 era, I just had to have it!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

Re: Photo: UP Gondola 63960 In Discharge Mode (1922)
From: Josh
Date: Tue, 08 Sep 2020 12:48:55 PDT
Far more interesting is the car behind it - SLR19040.


Re: HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

Steve and Barb Hile
 

The pictures can be seen in the Photos section of the IO site in the Emailed photos file.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jacob Damron
Sent: Tuesday, September 8, 2020 7:48 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

 

Steve:

 

Thank you for the information. I looked over those trucks and agree that they appear to be the best option. I found a seller and ebay and they're headed my way. 

 

For some reason the pictures didn't come through to my email and I can't find your reply on the IO page. 

 

Jacob

 

 

 

 


Re: Swift Tank Car

 

OK... what would Swift need a tank car for?

Gordon Spalty


Re: HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

mopacfirst
 

One of the photos I posted on the Rock Island group, the 20041, appears to have this type of truck.  Other cars had a type of roller-bearing 50 ton truck with a flat top to the sideframe, but appears different than this Barber truck.  Others in the series had a Commonwealth BX truck.  I haven't tried to see if these trucks correlated with specific groups of cars.  But when I saw them, they were bumped to general freight service, probably grain and flour mostly.

Ron Merrick


Re: HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

 

Perhaps someone on Shapeways can be persuaded. The sideframes would need to be designed for use with nylon bearing inserts to prevent the axle from wallowing out.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Jacob Damron <jacob.damron@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 7:47 PM
To: <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

 

Steve:

 

Thank you for the information. I looked over those trucks and agree that they appear to be the best option. I found a seller and ebay and they're headed my way. 

 

For some reason the pictures didn't come through to my email and I can't find your reply on the IO page. 

 

Jacob

 

 

 

 


Re: HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

Jacob Damron
 

Steve:

Thank you for the information. I looked over those trucks and agree that they appear to be the best option. I found a seller and ebay and they're headed my way. 

For some reason the pictures didn't come through to my email and I can't find your reply on the IO page. 

Jacob


 
 


Re: Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Friends,

The car in the photo is very interesting. It looks to me like an 1890s design, now of course downgraded to an in-plant car. Note that there is no air brake hose showing. By the 1890s most cars of this type would have had air brakes. Very likely air brakes are not used on this plant operation, and the hose has probably rotted off or was removed during repairs. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Tue, Sep 8, 2020 at 3:06 PM Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Dry.  You forgot dry.  Handling salt makes your skin very dry and the skin on your fingers can simply break open.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 08, 2020 12:38 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

 

Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

A photo from the Utah State Historical Society:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6zp4jhz

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Looks like boring, tough work.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

Steve and Barb Hile
 

I recall chasing this issue around many years ago.  The Rock Island diagram sheet refers to them as Barber S-4-L trucks with Timken roller bearings.  I need to find a better picture, but for now, this one will have to do

 

 

My conclusion, then was to use Bethlehem (old Cape Line) cast trucks, number 1213

 

 

Interestingly, I can’t find a reference to an S-4-L truck in the 1946 CBC, but they do show a very similar looking S-5-L truck, although it includes a plain (solid) bearing instead of a roller bearing.

 

 

The accompanying text reads as follows

 

 

Hope this helps.  Perhaps someone else can point to more information on theS-4-L truck.

 

Steve Hile

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jacob Damron
Sent: Monday, September 7, 2020 10:19 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

 

Fellow Modelers:

My name is Jacob Damron and I model the Rock Island and its passenger trains in the early 1960's. One of my next projects to expand my BX fleet is the Sunshine Models RI 20060-20069 10'6" aluminum box car (Jeff has already addressed my RI 20000-20051/20070-20084 research request). This car rode on Barber S-4 Swing Hanger trucks and I'm having a hard time locating such. 

Does anyone know if these trucks are/were offered in plastic or brass?

Thanks so much.

Jacob Damron
Ft Worth, TX


Re: Question about Central Vermont boxcar color

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

 

Ho folks,

 

    I’m hoping that Marty McGuirk of some other CV modeler can steer me in the right direction

for an appropriate model paint color for Central Vermont boxcars in the immediate postwar period,

preferably with a reference to an Accu-Paint or Tru- Color color number. If not Scale-Coat would be

my next order of preference. Am also wondering if it might be the same as a CN boxcar red color.

 

   Thanks in advance for any assistance, Don Valentine.

 


HO Barber S-4 Swing Hanger Trucks

Jacob Damron
 

Fellow Modelers:

My name is Jacob Damron and I model the Rock Island and its passenger trains in the early 1960's. One of my next projects to expand my BX fleet is the Sunshine Models RI 20060-20069 10'6" aluminum box car (Jeff has already addressed my RI 20000-20051/20070-20084 research request). This car rode on Barber S-4 Swing Hanger trucks and I'm having a hard time locating such. 

Does anyone know if these trucks are/were offered in plastic or brass?

Thanks so much.

Jacob Damron
Ft Worth, TX


Re: Dimensional Data - wrong assumptions

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Dave, Take a sharper look at the B&M’s USRA boxcars from 1940 on. I’m thinking that this may be a matter of semantics with some roads in that rather than using the EXT H or EXT W nomenclature it seems they just used EH or EW to save stenciling and paint, or am I wrong?

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W

 

 


Re: State of Maine Cars

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

The BAR r,w & b scheme seems to have been found on some wood sheathed reefers as well.

I wonder if it was not first used on some wood refers but really would like to know if anyone

has the date of when it was first used. I’m suspecting 1948 r 1949 but am far from certain of this.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 

 


Re: Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)

mel perry
 



On Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 1:32 PM mel perry via groups.io <clipper841=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
just looking at the tracks, the rails may
be there, but the track doesn't look like
it seen any cars?, if they ever stayed on
the rails, plus the rails in the google
photo look rusty as you know what,
judging by the shine on the tail end
of the wye, the end hasn't seen much
traffic, just observing, course if anyone
has RECENT photos of the end, i would
happily stand corrected
;-)
mel perry


On Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 1:20 PM Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
Mel,

Why would you say that? Go to the satellite view and you can see that the spur connects to somebody's line at a wye.


It really does look very model-genic!

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of mel perry <clipper841@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 8, 2020 3:12 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)
 
from the looks of it, it appears to be out
of service or abandoned?
mel perry

On Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 1:08 PM Josh <segorailroadmodels@...> wrote:

I saw this image and thought "huh, that looks familiar."

Then I realized that I literally drove past that elevator yesterday afternoon. You can see the location on google maps here: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3670186,-112.5858464,3a,75y,144.54h,97.16t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sP4EH_FyLKvQSwaxC7QPrlA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

This spur is screaming with "model railroad" details. There is this little elevator, an oil dealership, and a large truck loading dock where fluorite from the Bell Hill mines northwest of Delta was transferred to gondolas to be shipped to the Geneva Steel plant in Vineyard Utah. Fluorite was used as a flux in the smelting process; it's bright purple, so imagine a train of open hoppers filled with neon lavender rocks. That's a load that will set your layout apart!

 

You can see a larger-resolution version of the image here: https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s63208r9


Re: Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)

mel perry
 

just looking at the tracks, the rails may
be there, but the track doesn't look like
it seen any cars?, if they ever stayed on
the rails, 


On Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 1:20 PM Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
Mel,

Why would you say that? Go to the satellite view and you can see that the spur connects to somebody's line at a wye.


It really does look very model-genic!

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of mel perry <clipper841@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 8, 2020 3:12 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)
 
from the looks of it, it appears to be out
of service or abandoned?
mel perry

On Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 1:08 PM Josh <segorailroadmodels@...> wrote:

I saw this image and thought "huh, that looks familiar."

Then I realized that I literally drove past that elevator yesterday afternoon. You can see the location on google maps here: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3670186,-112.5858464,3a,75y,144.54h,97.16t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sP4EH_FyLKvQSwaxC7QPrlA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

This spur is screaming with "model railroad" details. There is this little elevator, an oil dealership, and a large truck loading dock where fluorite from the Bell Hill mines northwest of Delta was transferred to gondolas to be shipped to the Geneva Steel plant in Vineyard Utah. Fluorite was used as a flux in the smelting process; it's bright purple, so imagine a train of open hoppers filled with neon lavender rocks. That's a load that will set your layout apart!

 

You can see a larger-resolution version of the image here: https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s63208r9


Re: Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)

Bruce Smith
 

Mel,

Why would you say that? Go to the satellite view and you can see that the spur connects to somebody's line at a wye.


It really does look very model-genic!

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of mel perry <clipper841@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 8, 2020 3:12 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)
 
from the looks of it, it appears to be out
of service or abandoned?
mel perry

On Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 1:08 PM Josh <segorailroadmodels@...> wrote:

I saw this image and thought "huh, that looks familiar."

Then I realized that I literally drove past that elevator yesterday afternoon. You can see the location on google maps here: https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3670186,-112.5858464,3a,75y,144.54h,97.16t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sP4EH_FyLKvQSwaxC7QPrlA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

This spur is screaming with "model railroad" details. There is this little elevator, an oil dealership, and a large truck loading dock where fluorite from the Bell Hill mines northwest of Delta was transferred to gondolas to be shipped to the Geneva Steel plant in Vineyard Utah. Fluorite was used as a flux in the smelting process; it's bright purple, so imagine a train of open hoppers filled with neon lavender rocks. That's a load that will set your layout apart!

 

You can see a larger-resolution version of the image here: https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s63208r9

19481 - 19500 of 196819