Date   

Re: What car is this on the Rio Grande?

Bruce Smith
 

Folks, Brian,

My first thought was the same. I’m guessing that Ben’s evaluation was based on what appears to be a reddish end, with some variation in the intensity of the lighter side color. However, given the size/resolution of the image, I’m not sure how anyone can tell much of anything. There are limits to even the best of our abilities!  I tried to blow it up and it was too low a resolution to see anything but pixels. I would suggest that Scott find and post a higher resolution image. 

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn Al

On Sep 9, 2020, at 9:57 AM, Brian Carlson via groups.io <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Assuming we are talking about the 5th car my first thought was one of the silver PS-1s western RailwAy of Alabama or affiliated lines. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Sep 9, 2020, at 10:43 AM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Scott McDonald asked:
"The photo below was posted on the Rio Grande Historical Society Facebook page by Parker Wilson from his collection. I am reposting here with his permission.  Does anybody know what the silver car is? It looks like there is a BX-11 or 12 raised roof behind it so it is pretty tall."

<FB_IMG_1599659297502.jpg>

That's not a silver car, but a red car with white staining.  Assuming that the car behind it is a raided roof Bx-12/Bx-13 (10 ft 6 in IH), my guess is it's a 40 ft steel automobile boxcar.


Ben Hom

<FB_IMG_1599659297502.jpg>


Re: Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)

Jim Allen
 

Ron Mitchell and I were there about 1.5 years ago. The main the eye connects too belongs to the UP.   There were numerous cars sitting on that spur for active maintenance. I’m sure that spur is not in regular use. One loading dock is still there as well as all other buildings. 

Jim Allen. 

Jim Allen
Visit www.oscaledirectory.com


--
Jim Allen
Utah


Re: Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)

Jim Allen
 

These ramps were also used for sugar beets. 

Jim Allen
Visit www.oscaledirectory.com


--
Jim Allen
Utah


Paper Grain Doors 1947

Matt Smith
 

Great shot of paper grain doors in use 1947. Pantagraph collection of IDA. High res can be downloaded in upper right corner of page.

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll63/id/5685/rec/115
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Re: Photo: B&O Boxcar 175574 (1940)

vincent altiere
 

Bob-

Looking at that photo, it appears that the car farthest from the camera has a door that opens to the left. Do you know what B&O class of boxcars that might belong to ?? I wasn't aware the B&O had that type of car.

Vince Altiere


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Sep 9, 2020 10:29 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: B&O Boxcar 175574 (1940)

Photo: B&O Boxcar 175574 (1940)
A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh Collection:
Click on the photo and then scroll to enlarge it.
Two additional B&O boxcars in the photo.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: What car is this on the Rio Grande?

Brian Carlson
 

Assuming we are talking about the 5th car my first thought was one of the silver PS-1s western RailwAy of Alabama or affiliated lines. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Sep 9, 2020, at 10:43 AM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Scott McDonald asked:
"The photo below was posted on the Rio Grande Historical Society Facebook page by Parker Wilson from his collection. I am reposting here with his permission.  Does anybody know what the silver car is? It looks like there is a BX-11 or 12 raised roof behind it so it is pretty tall."

<FB_IMG_1599659297502.jpg>

That's not a silver car, but a red car with white staining.  Assuming that the car behind it is a raided roof Bx-12/Bx-13 (10 ft 6 in IH), my guess is it's a 40 ft steel automobile boxcar.


Ben Hom

<FB_IMG_1599659297502.jpg>


Re: What car is this on the Rio Grande?

Benjamin Hom
 

Scott McDonald asked:
"The photo below was posted on the Rio Grande Historical Society Facebook page by Parker Wilson from his collection. I am reposting here with his permission.  Does anybody know what the silver car is? It looks like there is a BX-11 or 12 raised roof behind it so it is pretty tall."


That's not a silver car, but a red car with white staining.  Assuming that the car behind it is a raided roof Bx-12/Bx-13 (10 ft 6 in IH), my guess is it's a 40 ft steel automobile boxcar.


Ben Hom


Re: Loading plaster, was Grain, In A Refrigerator Car (1918)

Randy Hees
 

At the south edge of Las Vegas at Arden, the Arden Plaster Company mined and processed architectural plaster products from c.1907 to 1929.  The majority of their production was shipped to southern California. (the Company was headquartered in Pasadena)  There is a substantial collection of waybills held at the Nevada State Museum in Las Vegas.  Those include reporting marks.  Shipments to Southern CA are primarily via refrigerator cars, mostly PFE, but also Santa Fe...  Shipments east are made in box cars.  Plaster is moisture sensitive, so they must have been dry cars.  The high grade plaster was likely clean enough to not contaminate the cars.

I postulate that the round trip was quick, on a single railroad, (orignally the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake, later the Los Angeles and Salt Lake, allways associated if not controlled by UP) preventing the cars from straying off system.  The short turn around (5-7 days) allowed use of refrigerator cars being held for scheduled shipments, and getting some revenue from an otherwise static car.  

By the way, Arden Plaster operated a 5 mile long 3' narrow gauge railroad connecting their plant with the mines.

Randy Hees


Photo: B&O Boxcar 175574 (1940)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: B&O Boxcar 175574 (1940)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh Collection:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A715.4054768.CP

Click on the photo and then scroll to enlarge it.

Two additional B&O boxcars in the photo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Pittsburgh & Shawmut Railroad Dump Car M-24 (1954)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Pittsburgh & Shawmut Railroad Dump Car M-24 (1954)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh Collection:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A31-PandS-6-M-24

Click on the photo and then scroll to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


What car is this on the Rio Grande?

Scott
 

The photo below was posted on the Rio Grande Historical Society Facebook page by Parker Wilson from his collection. I am reposting here with his permission.  Does anybody know what the silver car is? It looks like there is a BX-11 or 12 raised roof behind it so it is pretty tall.

Thanks
Scott McDonald 


Re: Swift Tank Car

Barry Bennett
 

And lots of blood and urine.

Barry Bennett

On Wed, 9 Sep 2020 at 12:19, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Gordon,

How about fat? Animal fats are a valuable byproduct of slaughter houses. They are used in all sorts of other products from cosmetics to explosives (think glycerine).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Tue, Sep 8, 2020 at 9:12 PM Gordon <boomer1944@...> wrote:
OK... what would Swift need a tank car for?

Gordon Spalty


Re: Swift Tank Car

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Gordon,

How about fat? Animal fats are a valuable byproduct of slaughter houses. They are used in all sorts of other products from cosmetics to explosives (think glycerine).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Tue, Sep 8, 2020 at 9:12 PM Gordon <boomer1944@...> wrote:
OK... what would Swift need a tank car for?

Gordon Spalty


Re: Loading Grain In A Refrigerator Car (1918)

Ray Hutchison
 

...except when they were dried out and used for grain service?


Re: Dimensional Data - wrong assumptions

akerboomk
 

B&M XM-1 builders photos (and lots of other data) available here:

            https://www.bmrrhs.org/box_71000_series/

 

 


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: Wabash kit bash

Paul Doggett
 

Tony

Thank you.

Paul Doggett

On 9 Sep 2020, at 05:00, Tony Thompson <tony@signaturepress.com> wrote:



I have just finished a kit bash of a 17000 series Wabash automobile car, the original kit was a Funaro and Camerlengo car with wood side doors and Murphy ends. I used Rocket Express Youngstown side doors, 3,3,3, Dreadnaught ends and automobile car end doors I did this as I have not long since built the original Wabash version see below.
I love the steel doors and ends. Excellent work, Paul.


Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com






Re: Dimensional Data - wrong assumptions

Dave Parker
 

Don:

I am not sure what the B&M was up when I look past my mid-1930s era of interest.  As I said, with box-cars up through the XM-1s (but not beyond; I haven't looked), I have never seen all four measurements (EXW and EXH and EW and EH) stenciled on a car, regardless of date.  Looking just at the XM-1s, the ORERs through 1935 only give EW and EH (8-11 and 12-5).  Starting with my 1937 copy, however, they all give both EW and EXW as 9-6, and both EH and EXH as 12-1.  And yet the photos, even of 72662 in 1954, show only the original 8-11 and 12-5 values.  Huh?

Taken at face value, the 9-6 and 12-1 values are almost certainly EXW and EXH (probably representing the upper door tracks), but otherwise I cannot begin to explain what the heck the B&M was doing, or why.

Bottom line from a modeling standpoint:  apply lettering that matches contemporaneous photos, and don't overthink the problem.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Wabash kit bash

Tony Thompson
 

I have just finished a kit bash of a 17000 series Wabash automobile car, the original kit was a Funaro and Camerlengo car with wood side doors and Murphy ends. I used Rocket Express Youngstown side doors, 3,3,3, Dreadnaught ends and automobile car end doors I did this as I have not long since built the original Wabash version see below.
I love the steel doors and ends. Excellent work, Paul.


Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Re: Salt weathering

Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

  1)  When did the use of galvanized on roofs become ubiquitous?  I
       associate "peeling paint on the roof" with more modern cars.  Am
       I wrong?

Yep. It was about 1910. You're closer to right about UNPAINTED galvanized.

  2) How common/uncommon would it be to see a galvanized roof
      combined with wood roof walks?

     In 1910 and thereafter? Universal.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: PRR Depressed Center Flatcar 470011 (1949)

Brian Termunde
 

Ugh! Why do words just up and disappear! <G>

Somehow when I wrote "There's a small hill on the viewers right, the area around the plant, for as long as I can remember." either my computer or the internet (yeah, Right! <G>) deleted the words " . . . the area around the plant was flat as a pancake." 

Sorry about this glitch, which obviously wasn't my fault (oh yes, of course it wasn't! <G>)!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

Re: Photo: PRR Depressed Center Flatcar 470011 (1949)
From: Brian Termunde
Date: Mon, 07 Sep 2020 15:34:43 PDT
Bob,
Thanks for sharing this. I especially appreciate knowing some of the background as my uncle worked there for quite some time and it's been a part of Salt Lake for many years. My uncle and his family lived not too far south of the plant (walking distance, although I rather doubt that Uncle Vern would have walked! <G>).

I do want to stress that I am NOT trying to shoot the messenger as the information provided is what's on that very interesting website, however I don't think that it was taken at the actual Gadsby Plant. In the photo;


There's a small hill on the viewers right, the area around the plant, for as long as I can remember. Here's a link to a Google map showing the area;


That being said, I am sorry but I cannot offer any suggestion as the the actual location.

Bob, Thanks again for another interesting photo!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

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